Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Stipa gigantea’

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

Before leaving Ilwaco, we planted two tiny lavender starts in the Time Enough Books garden, where we think they will enjoy the scree-like environment.  The weather was ideal: comfortable, not too hot, very little wind.

The Time Enough Books garden

The Time Enough Books garden

Then we were off toward some north end jobs, beginning with a check up on the planters at

The Red Barn Arena

I finally managed to get two photos of the baby, born earlier this spring.

foal

foal2

one of the barrels

one of the barrels

We couldn’t cut across a pasture to the garden next door as a horse grazed in that pasture today, so we walked along the highway.

Diane’s garden

This Stipa gigantea puts on a good show for those driving by.

This Stipa gigantea puts on a good show for those driving by.


Stipa gigantea

Stipa gigantea


back garden planters

back garden planters

On the road again, I remembered that Garden Tour Nancy had asked me if we would check out a potential tour garden for her.  Located in Tides West, it was on our way to our next job.

a garden tour sneak peek

I do believe this one will be on the tour, so I can’t show too much.  I was so impressed; the owner has built all these features herself in just one year.

IMG_9526

I was immediately impressed.

I was immediately impressed.


I wish I had such skills!

I wish I had such skills!


Just one year old

Just one year old


one of two cute dogs

one of two cute dogs

I was inspired to turn two photos into Waterlogues:

Painted in Waterlogue

Painted in Waterlogue

The gardener told us that Ed Strange had recommended that she contact Garden Tour Nancy, and that he calls her garden “Neverland”.  She thought he meant it was like a magical fairyland until she learned he actually meant he thought she would never be finished with projects.  It is just around the corner from our friend J9’s and I am surprised I had not noticed it before, until I realized that  I first visited J9’s new abode and walked around that block over a year ago, and this garden had not even begun then.

Back to the world of work…

Golden Sands Assisted Living

Next, Golden Sands, where Allan strimmed the center lawn (because its easier to bring a string trimmer than a lawn mower down the hallways to the central courtyard).

outside the dining room

outside the dining room (NW quadrant)


SE quadrant

SE quadrant

I had had a plan for quite some time that I finally got around to.  I wanted to prune the rhododendrons behind the SW quadrant to be closer to the height of the ones in the upper right above, that were severely pruned two years ago (not by me).

SW quadrant

SW quadrant: Behind the maple tree are the rhodies I have had my eye on.

The best time to prune them is shortly after they bloom, so last month would have been better.

before: the view out the back hallway window

before: the view out the back hallway window


Here they are pruned...

Here they are pruned… and not looking all bare and stubby.


Well done, if I do say so...and now someone in the corner has a view of the garden.

Well done, if I do say so…and now someone in the corner has a view of the garden.


And there is a garden view from the back hallways window.

And there is a garden view from the back hallways window.

It might seem like a bad plan to have large shrubs blocking the view.  However, before we got our hands on them, the four quadrants were just scrubby sections of lawn.

Allan hauled four wheelbarrowloads of branches down the halls and out to the debris pile.

With a great sense of accomplishment, we went about ten blocks up the road to

Klipsan Beach Cottages

looking in the east deer fence gate

looking in the east deer fence gate


a little frog in a nest of ivy (not planted by us, and not the dreaded English ivy)

a little frog in a nest of ivy (not planted by us, and a more delicate choice than the dreaded English ivy)


the birdbath view

the birdbath view


sit spot in the fenced garden, with Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant'

sit spot in the fenced garden, with Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’


Alliums and roses

Alliums and roses


bright orange lilies, bright sunshine

bright orange lilies, bright sunshine


River of Geranium 'Rozanne' in the shade along the road to the cottages

River of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ in the shade along the road to the cottages


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


I'm pleased that some Fuchsia magellanica that I brought from my garden are sizing up.

in the A Frame garden: I’m pleased that some Fuchsia magellanica that I brought from my garden are sizing up.


A Frame garden: hydrangea and Allium albopilosum

A Frame garden: hydrangea and Allium albopilosum (Allan’s photo)

On the way further north, we stopped at Jack’s for some snacks and a hose fitting.

Jack's Country Store, Ocean Park

Jack’s Country Store, Ocean Park


I noticed someone working on a nice curbside garden at Anita's Coastal Café.

I noticed someone working on a nice curbside garden at Anita’s Coastal Café.

Marilyn’s garden

At our northernmost garden, I had at long last remembered to bring 13 little painted sage plants, and when they were in the ground, Annuals Planting Time was finally truly done!

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' at Marilyn's

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ at Marilyn’s


one of the cosmos that reseeded from last year

one of the cosmos that reseeded from last year

Just as I thought we were done with our weeding session, I saw an Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ that needed deadheading.

before

before


after

after


path, looking south; we did a fair amount of gravel weeding today

path, looking south; we did a fair amount of gravel weeding today


the buds of Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

the buds of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’


more Crocosmia 'Lucifer' buds

more Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ buds


Cosmos

Cosmos


the back deck

the back porch


looking north from the back porch

looking north from the back porch

I had pulled out a big clump of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, behind the montbretia to the right, because I felt it blocked Marilyn’s view of the garden.  Her assistant told me a mother deer and two baby fawns are frequenting the garden and Marilyn loves to observe them.  There is still plenty of ‘Lucifer’ on the other side of the path.

  I wish there were not so much orange montbretia.  It was the only plant in the landscape when we began, just a bit here and there.  That clump got huge before I realized it.

Tall Miscanthus now blocks the view of the garage to the west.

Tall Miscanthus now blocks the view of the garage to the west.


north view with catmint  sprawling on the path

north view with catmint sprawling on the path


Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum


Agastaches and poppies by the driveway

Agastaches and poppies by the driveway

I had hoped we would be done in time to do Andersen’s RV Park today.  It was not to be, so that will have to wait for tomorrow.

We finished with a tiny pruning job at the south side of the port office, where once again we were in the cold north wind.  A volunteer elderberry needed some branches trimmed.  The wind discouraged photos of the process.

Allan's photo: the port wind warning flag was up, as it has been often this month.

Allan’s photo: the port wind warning flag was up, as it has been often this month.

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 24 May 2015

I repeated yesterday’s day off in a way:  I worked on catching up on this blog for much longer than I had planned.  At least I got outside…without my camera…at 3 PM instead of 5.  Weeded like mad in the back garden till almost 8 and dug out a surprising amount of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (way too much of a good thing) and a sickly looking Centaurea montana (rather a shame).  The latter might have come back if I had just cut it back hard but I suddenly was in a frenzy to dig it out completely.  (Now I will miss its spidery blue flowers.  Todd informs me that there are new cultivars in blue that are better than the old one that I had.)

Centaurea montana...bye bye

Centaurea montana…bye bye

BLACK Centaurea montana

pretty sure I still have the cool BLACK Centaurea montana in the front garden

Allan’s productive days

On a drive to Long Beach to get some gutter fittings, Allan took some photos of Black Lake.  His hope was to go boating on Monday.

Black Lake, Ilwaco

Black Lake, Ilwaco, a popular place on a holiday Sunday

Black Lake dock

Black Lake dock

After buying his supplies at Dennis Company in Long Beach, Allan took this photo of the carriage ride going by the flowers at Long Beach City Hall.

mainly featuring lambsears and sea thrift

mainly featuring lambsears and sea thrift

His project: to fix a rotten board at the top of our garage.  This has bothered him for years; other projects have taken priority before now.  He was inspired by his desire to put another downspout for another rainwater collection bin, and he photographed the project as it went along.

I don't even notice it anymore.

Side: I don’t even notice it anymore.

front

front

In the dark, with misty rain falling, and lots of progress showing.

In the dark, with misty rain falling, and lots of progress showing.

Monday, 25 May 2015

Allan’s garage repair project continued.

DSC01013

new wood spliced to old solid wood, replacing old rotten wood

all painted, with no seam showing....I am impressed.

all painted, with no seam showing….I am impressed.

new downspout installed

new downspout installed

Allan rewarded himself with a boating excursion on Black Lake…coming up after I regale you with some garden (and PUPPY!) photos.  (There will be a bird in Allan’s set of photos.)

Monday in the garden

the poppies by our driveway

the poppies by our driveway

As I was doing some weeding in the front garden to make room for planting the last of the six packs of cosmos, our friend Ed Strange drove up, bringing my nephew Jackson for a welcome visit.

Jackson weighs 20 pounds now!

Jackson weighs 20 pounds now!

That face! That paw!

That face! That paw!

Jacks in motion

Jacks in motion

sit and shake hands

sit and shake hands

What a good boy!

What a good boy!

Then the back garden became much more interesting than Ed and a treat.

Then the back garden became much more interesting than Ed and a treat.

DSC01022

an enormous treat for me

an enormous treat for me

Ed left for a gardening job, while I got back to my weeding and planting.

back garden in progress

back garden weeding in progress

After removing six or more huge Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, I sheared the rest.  I picked up most of the clippings; leaving them lie there leads to a veritable grove of Autumn Joy.

Did you know its original name is Sedum 'Herbstfreude'?

Did you know its original name is Sedum ‘Herbstfreude’?

Removing some of the sedums gave me space for new plants.

Removing some of the sedums gave me space for new plants (my new Agastaches and Sanguisorbas).

Some accomplishments and failures in the garden this weekend:

This area had been thick with weeds, and snails and slugs had eaten a Shasta daisy to the ground.  Weeded: check!

This area had been thick with weeds, and snails and slugs had eaten a Shasta daisy to the ground. Weeded (pretty much): check!

where on Saturday, I removed a sickly, sprawling Centaurea montana.

where on Saturday, I removed a sickly, sprawling Centaurea montana.

Two huge sedums removed, making room for two small plugs of Panicum 'Northwind' instead.

Middle bed: Two huge sedums removed, making room for two small plugs of Panicum ‘Northwind’ instead.

Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea

Middle bed: Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea

did not get the end of the middle bed weeded: fail.

did not get the end of the middle bed weeded: fail.

end of east bed, before

end of east bed, before

after.  Weedy sedge dug out.  Check!

after. Weedy sedge dug out. Huge Autumn Joy removed.  Dwarf fireweed pulled. Check!

southeast shade bed: weeding not done, and what was done not picked up.  Fail!

southeast shade bed: weeding not done, and what was done not picked up. Fail!

Mary expected a better job.

Mary expected a better job.

the garden left in chaotic condition....

the garden left in chaotic condition….

Some Todd plants found...Triumph!

Some Todd plants found…Triumph! And Sluggo cast all about to protect them…

Despite wishing I had gotten more weeding done, I felt pleased that I had gotten about 20 of my ladies in waiting planted and was able to enjoy an evening stroll around the garden.

a fragrant old rose (moved from my other garden, lost the ID on the way)

a fragrant old rose (moved from my other garden, lost the ID on the way)

This rose used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery...back when the building was pink and the garden undiscovered by the deer.

This striped rose used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery…back when the building was pink and the garden undiscovered by the deer.

Iris siberica

Iris siberica

Patio still laden with the last of work Annuals (and Perennials) Planting Time

Patio still laden with the last of work Annuals (and Perennials) Planting Time

Allan boating on Black Lake

Allan rewarded himself for a job well done with a late afternoon excursion to Black Lake, which, though small, is only a few blocks away.

DSC00101

Black Lake rhododendron

Black Lake rhododendron

DSC00105

an interpretive sign

an interpretive sign

Our local paper just had this interesting article about local youth making Josh’s trail better.

ready to launch

ready to launch

DSC00139

from the water

 

Allan was able to quietly float up to this heron.

Allan was able to quietly float up to this heron.

DSC00119

DSC00120

 

DSC00133

Allan felt sorry when his presence annoyed the bird into flapping out of the water.

those annoying humans

those annoying humans

DSC00121

DSC00122

the built-up side of the lake revealed

the built-up side of the lake revealed

The bird came back to fish some more, and allowed another photo, my favourite:

DSC00135

Allan tested out his new waterproof camera by actually putting in under water to photograph the weeds that can make this lake feel shallow for boating:

water weeds

water weeds

We had both worn ourselves out with our weekend extertions.  Fortunately, our next work week would be only four days  long as Allan has another boating expedition planned for next Saturday.  I am thinking that three day weekends make life much more pleasant than twelve day work weeks.

Read Full Post »

Friday, 24 April 2015

You might not be able to see the pouring rain in the photo below unless you look quite closely.

from our front porch

from our front porch

Ribes speciosum

The Ribes speciosum is STILL blooming. What a great do-er. Must take starts to gardens of various clients.

The Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine) against the porch wall is climbing tall.

The Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine) against the porch wall is climbing tall.

The rain stopped and I began to gather some plants to plant today.  I envied the neighbour cat, who clearly planned to spend the day in our garden.

The orange cat from across the street is furtive and shy, unlike Onyx from next door who is a good friend of mine.

The orange cat from across the street is furtive and shy, unlike Onyx from next door who is a good friend of mine.

I wish I could spend the day in my garden, too.

I wish I could spend the day in my garden, too.

Ilwaco

Ilwaco post office garden

Ilwaco post office garden

I think that the reason I have a hard time growing sweet peas against the picket fence in our volunteer garden at the post office is that that strip is in a mysterious rain shadow.  It is dry while the rest of the garden is damp.  Well, phooey.  I don’t think I feel inspired to specially water it every day.

We went over to First Avenue to add some diascias to some of the planters and while we did, I made a list of what we will need to finish planting them up for the season.  Except for nasturtiums (from seeds), I am trying to do all plants that will not wilt when dry, as we can only water these every third day.

planter at First and Eagle with Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' and diascia

planter at First and Eagle with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and diascia

a boat with me mum's name

a boat with me mum’s name

I checked on the condition of the boatyard garden.  We will weed it mid-next week in hopes of attaining top quality for the May 2nd parade.  This year, for the first time since 2010, I won’t be taking photos for the Discover Ilwaco page as the parade conflicts with the Rhodie tour….or vice versa, as the parade has been going on for years and the rhodie tour is new.  Gardening touring trumps a parade in my life.  (Three days later:  I may have figured out a way to do both; we’ll see.)

a reminder

a reminder

horsetail is popping up in the boatyard again.  We will deal with it NEXT week.

horsetail is popping up in the boatyard again. We will deal with it NEXT week.

Stipa gigantea in full bloom already

Stipa gigantea in full bloom already

at the south end of the boatyard

at the south end of the boatyard

Back to the planter work:

by the Portside Café

by the Portside Café

Allan's photo of the Portside with customers at each window table.

Allan’s photo of the Portside with customers at each window table.

The Depot Restaurant

When we dined at the Depot earlier this week, Chef Michael informed us that the building will be painted soon.  Oh dearie me.  Today we made a short stop there to put bamboo stake tripods over the most vulnerable little plants, like the newly planted Nicotiana langsdorfii and the alliums.  We already lost two alliums during the recent roofing of the building. Even though Michael said the painters will be careful…better safe…

little bamboo stakes tied into tripods.  I won't tidy up the back of the bed till the painting is done.

little bamboo stakes tied into tripods. I won’t tidy up the back of the bed till the painting is done.

staking the lilies in the long garden

protective staking of the lilies in the long garden

A rain squall came up just as we were leaving, perfect timing for a drive to the Basket Case.

driving north in a light rain

driving north on Sandridge in a light rain

The Basket Case Greenhouse

While I did not get any yet, I am excited to try the new cross between rudbeckia and echinacia: echibeckia.  Ed Strange said it was a great do-er for him last summer.

While I did not get any yet, I am excited to try the new cross between rudbeckia and echinacia: echibeckia. Ed Strange said it was a great do-er for him last summer.

There are still trays and trays of exquisite and economically priced violas left.

There are still trays and trays of exquisite and economically priced violas left.

perusing my purchase (Allan's photo)

perusing my purchase (Allan’s photo) (with another subtle Rhodie Tour reminder)

Fred can be very funny.  (Allan's photo)

Fred can be very funny. (Allan’s photo)

Next, back down the road to

The Red Barn Arena and Diane’s Garden

Allan had a project at the Red Barn: to replace two worn out wooden barrels with new plastic ones.

The little garden at the Red Barn

The little garden at the Red Barn

his cordless rechargable drill for making drainage holes

his cordless rechargable drill for making drainage holes.  He drilled out all four so that barn owner Amy can have two extras ready for use.

Allan's photo: digging out the old soil and bulbs

Allan’s photo: digging out the old soil and bulbs; some of the narcissi got replanted in the ground level garden

Allan's photo: the whiskey barrels were pretty well done.

Allan’s photo: the whiskey barrels were pretty well done.

There is always some horsey activity going on.  (Allan's photo)

There is always some horsey activity going on. (Allan’s photo)

bulbs replanted into new container (Allan's photo)

bulbs replanted into new container with Erysimum and red diascia added (Allan’s photo)

I used to use bright yellow, tall Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ in these barrels.  I got tired of seeing them not thrive from not being watered enough, so am going with the much less thirsty Erysimum this year.

Meanwhile, I planted the lone planter by the south door of the barn.

otherplanter

The red calibrachoa 'Vampire' has come through the winter with many blooms already.

The red calibrachoa ‘Vampire’ has come through the winter with many blooms already.

Hugo observed my work.

Hugo observed my work.

I feel bad for Hugo who seems always to be in his stall.  He is missing one eye and the other one seems cloudy, so I wonder if he is blind.  I hope he gets to go out sometimes in the evenings.

While Allan finished his project, I walked over to Diane’s garden next door, with some pink diascia and blue bacopa to plant.

Tulip 'Angelique' in one of her pots

Tulip ‘Angelique’ in one of her pots

I noticed that the planter closest to the garage is so dry that the tulips withered.  I sent Diane a photo-illustrated email.  I often find that people don’t realize that the eaves of a building keep a certain pot or garden area completely dry.

happy rainwatered planters...and one dry one

happy rainwatered planters…and one dry one

In the front garden, Stipa gigantea in full bloom

In the front garden, Stipa gigantea in full bloom

Long Beach

We had a bit of deadheading to do in Long Beach, left over from yesterday’s mostly rained out day.  The red tulips and late white narcissi in Veterans Field are going to be all done by the parade day (May 3rd) due to blooming early this year.  However, the early bloom for red Geum and blue Salvia ‘May Night’ will make up for that.

the last of the narcissi and tulips

the last of the narcissi and tulips

Geum and Salvia coming on

Geum and Salvia coming on

Long Beach City Hall also needed deadheading attention and we planted a golden Physocarpus in a dull area of the garden.

Physocarpus 'Dart's Gold' should liven up the north garden bed....

Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’ should liven up the north garden bed….

which has taller plants at its other end

which has taller plants at its other end

the west wall of city hall

the west wall of city hall; the dianthus on the corner got blasted by Thursday’s wind

across the street, the HQ for our neighbours' cranberry farm

across the street, the HQ for our neighbours’ cranberry farm

Long Beach City Hall

Long Beach City Hall

west2

tiles by local artist Renee O'Connor are set into the sidewalk

tiles by local artist Renee O’Connor are set into the sidewalk

The Anchorage Cottages

We had one more garden to check, and at The Anchorage we were greeted by my good friend Mitzu.

Mitzu

Mitzu

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

center courtyard

center courtyard

The center courtyard garden is full of scilla that is just going over.  Next time, we will have to pull all of it and the garden will be transformed.  Today, I could not resist pulling some but really did not have time for all of it.

Scilla, which I wish was not in this garden at all.

Scilla, which I wish was not in this garden at all.

Every year, we pull out foliage and many bulbs.  It always comes back.

Every year, we pull out foliage and many bulbs. It always comes back.

The top of the ceanothus at one end of the courtyard is pitiful.  Even though it won't be pretty, we will cut it back to good new foliage next time.

The top of the ceanothus at one end of the courtyard is pitiful. Even though it won’t be pretty for awhile, we will cut it back to good new foliage next time.

shade garden:  Note to self, prune the rhodo gently back from the siding next time.

shade garden: Note to self, prune the rhodo gently back from the siding next time.

the "Zen Courtyard"  Note to self: Beth wants a Japanese maple here.  I need to find one that is extra special; the hardest part is finding time to shop for it.

the “Zen Courtyard” Note to self: Beth wants a Japanese maple here. I need to find one that is extra special; the hardest part is finding time to shop for it.

Clearly, we need a good long session at the Anchorage to get everything done that needs doing right now.  I think we need to go “overseas” (to 7 Dees in Seaside perhaps) to find a special little Japanese maple.  (But WHEN?)  I don’t want a plain old red-leaved one, thank you very much.

Darker and darker clouds inspired us to hurry at the end of the job, and as we got into the van, down by the Chameacyparis trees, the rain came.

rain2

Tomorrow: We have to get up dreadfully early (for us!!) because it is beach clean up day, and a work day, and a puppy visiting day.

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 25 February 2015

It would be far too dull to tell you anything much about Wednesday except that it rained, and  thought I’d do some photo deleting and then read a book. Eight hours later, I had deleted 10,819 photos from 2013 and 2014, bringing my total down from over 41,000. I take fifty photos, at least, on most workdays and on garden tour days have been known to take three or four hundred. A lot of them are to move blog narration along. They build up. Also I was providing photo content for Facebook pages and the photos that were promoting other people’s businesses and events really add up after a year.  This year, my goal is to delete as I go.

Thursday, 26 February 2015

We should have gone to work even though rain seemed to be threatening.  The rain never arrived.  However, I had gotten three interlibrary loans at once and was desperate to read them.  Allan occasionally reassured me, as he contentedly went back and forth to his workshop, that the weather was quite chilly and we most definitely would suffer at work.

The middle one is Work of Her Own by Susan Wittig Albert

The middle one is Work of Her Own by Susan Wittig Albert

Although I was wracked with guilt and often felt that I should be out at least weeding my own garden, I read Walking the Wrack Line and started Work of Her Own.  I’ve added some favourite bits of Walking the Wrack Line to my previous post about Barbara Hurd.

cat

Even though I had had to set aside The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay to read the un-renewable interlibrary loans, Houdini followed me into the Barbara Hurd book:

houdini

I would have finished Work of Her Own as well, had we not had a dinner date at…

The Cove Restaurant

…where we were greeted by Parking Lot Cat.

He ran up to meet us.

He ran up to meet us.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The Cove entry garden is getting its spring clean up.

The Cove entry garden is getting its spring clean up.

….with sister gardener Terran.  She and Shelly Hedges, former owner of the late lamented Pelicano Restaurant, have begun a thriving gardening business called Flowering Hedge Design.   Terran and I gardened together at each other’s jobs one summer many years ago.  She’s 28 years younger than me and I see her as being the prime gardener on the Peninsula for years to come, long after Allan and I have retired.

Terran and me at The Cove

Terran and me at The Cove

We had fish tacos and steamer clams and closed with a delicious apple cake made from owner Sondra’s mum’s own recipe.  Terran treated us in thanks for having passed some jobs along to Flowering Hedge.

apple

After telly time, I read Work of Her Own till after 2 AM, with the lovely sound of rain pounding on the roof, because the weather forecast for Friday was 100% in favour of rain.  (I’ll likely do a post later about Susan Wittig Albert’s two books about work and writing.)

Friday, 27 February 2015

After staying up so late, I was shocked to wake up to sunshine.  Work beckoned after all.  Feeling mentally flummoxed by having my reading day plan aborted, I decided that we’d work on the parking lot berms just east of downtown Long Beach.  When we ran an errand at the Port of Ilwaco, we got distracted by weeds and began the day there instead.

Port of Ilwaco

The planter at Peninsula Sanitation, where we checked to make sure our bill was paid.

The planter at Peninsula Sanitation, where we checked to make sure our bill was paid. (Allan’s photo)

I see weeds and tatty grasses in the river rock bed by the old Harbor Lights Motel!

I see shotweeds and tatty grasses in the river rock bed by the old Harbor Lights Motel!

before, along Howerton Way

before, looking west along Howerton Way

after

after

We had not seen how weedy this area was, when we did the area west of it in almost dusk last week.

Some tatty grass got cut and two old blue fescue got pulled.

Looking east: Some tatty grass got cut and two old blue fescue got pulled.

The underlying landscape fabric shows through here and there in these beds, which drives me crazy.

The underlying landscape fabric shows through here and there in these beds, which drives me crazy.

If I had done the river rockscape, I would have laid pea gravel down first to hide the fabric.  It shows through here and there on the edges and in the bed itself.  We bucketed a half bucket more rocks from the next bed to the west to cover more partially bare areas.  The bed to the west, that I thought we had weeded pretty well in the dusk, gave us another two buckets of weeds today.  Finally, we moved on to

Long Beach

where we got distracted by some tatty blue oat grass in the Veterans Field garden.

messy

messy

better

better

I pulled two even more pitiful blue oat grass totally out.  See, I am trying to make this bed red white and blue without being all jingoistic about it because I am not a nationalist.  So my red white and blue scheme is fairly subtle.

The new bed on the other side of the lawn is also supposed to be red white and blue, so I planted a semi-dwarf red Wiegela ‘Crimson Kisses’ that I’ve had in a pot every since the Garden Bloggers Fling last July.

the new bed

the new bed

white(ish) narcissi

white(ish) narcissi

Finally, we got to the three parking lot berms.  We’d lose too much damp heavy soil to weed areas like this now:

weeds

The pale grass is Quaking Oat Grass, which is kind of cute in bloom and can stay for now.

The pale grass is Quaking Oat Grass, which is kind of cute in bloom and can stay for now.

We focused on the pruning and the removal of the largest velvet grasses and dandelions and shotweeds.

some narcissi in quaking grass

some narcissi in quaking grass

north berm before, Allan's photo, with messy Stipa gigantea

north berm before, Allan’s photo, with messy Stipa gigantea

after....better (Allan's photo)

after….better (Allan’s photo)

Hmm, even though the stipa still look messy, at least their old upright flowering stalks have been cut off.

Allan's photo of our weather conditions

Allan’s photo of our weather conditions

The south end of the bed was a mess...

The south end of the bed was a mess…

with Himalayan blackberries...

with Himalayan blackberries…

...which Allan removed with the pick.

…which Allan removed with the pick.

Before this berm was done, it became a three ibuprofen day.

Before this berm was done, it became a three ibuprofen day.

For the past two years we have pretty much given up on the center berm.  It’s mostly gone to grass and we hit it with a weedeater now and again.  Today, Allan dug out some gorse starts and some of the larger dandelions.  I often have bigger dreams for this berm and always run out of time before I can implement any of them.

the boring center berm with beach pines

the boring center berm with beach pines, Allan’s photo

Miraculously, that spot just above which has rugosa roses gave a lot of its weeds up ever so easily, probably because the soil was softened by needles of a dead beach pine which has been cut down by the city crew.

As I did a spot of weeding over in Fifth Street Park, a torrential rain finally arrived.  All we did on the third berm was pull some old Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ blades.

We'll get back to it soon.

We’ll get back to it soon.  I know these aren’t really berms; that’s what the city crew and I have nicknamed them over the years.

If this had come earlier, I'd have spent the day weeding.

If this had come earlier, I’d have spent the day weeding.

admiring Culbertson Field garden on the way to dump our debris

before the weather changed: admiring Culbertson Field garden on our way to the berms

Depot Restaurant

I was glad we had made our dinner date with Kathleen for 5 o clock, even though it had seemed too early before the rain came.

depot

The Depot Restaurant in Seaview

Kathleen's Autumn Duck

Kathleen’s Autumn Duck

“Pan Seared Duck Breast on Yam Mashers with Candied Pecans topped with Caramelized Granny Smith Apples and Sweet Onions in a Maple Glaze”

my scrumptious bowl of udon noodles with prawns

my scrumptious bowl of udon noodles with prawns

Allan tucked into his parmesan chicken before I remembered that we wanted a photo.

Allan tucked into his parmesan chicken before I remembered that we wanted a photo.

Kathleen's apple cobbler

Kathleen’s apple cobbler

my chocolate Guinness cake on a bed of blackberry sauce

my chocolate Guinness cake on a bed of blackberry sauce

Although I have an aversion to black cherry and chocolate together, I found the combination with blackBERRY to be quite acceptable.

Allan's chocolate espresso pot de creme

Allan’s chocolate espresso pot de creme

We had a lovely time indeed with Kathleen, who was down for the weekend, and who came to our house afterwards for a good long living room chat and a cuppa Earl Gray tea, which she had thoughtfully provided as she knows it’s my favourite.

Tomorrow: working up north

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 14 September 2014

After all the walking on yesterday’s cottage tour, my knee and calf were both playing up, so almost all I did was sit and blog about the tour. Garden Tour Nancy came over with a large piece of salmon which her hunter/gatherer spouse, Phil, had caught in his secret fishing place. (I cannot tell.)

Feast your eyes on that, caught six hours earlier.

Feast your eyes on that, caught six hours earlier.

At least I had some flowers to offer in return.

At least I had some flowers to offer in return.

Fortunately for this blog entry, Allan rowed around Black Lake for awhile and took some photos.

P9140001

P9140002

P9140003

P9140007

A fisherman (a 'Superfisherman') arrived and told of the trout he had caught, eagles that watch the lake from the surrounding trees and confirmed that I had seen otters as he'd seen them swimming in the weeds north of the dock.

Allan writes: A fisherman (a ‘Superfisherman’) arrived and told of the trout he had caught, eagles that watch the lake from the surrounding trees and confirmed that I had seen otters as he’d seen them swimming in the weeds north of the dock.

Ready to row the sailboat hull from the Yacht Club.

Ready to row the sailboat hull from the Yacht Club.

a couple taking wildlife pics

a couple taking wildlife pics

two kayakers who had launched from a dock by the school

two kayakers who had launched from a dock by the school

P9140023

P9140026

The dock by the highway turn off was a gull hangout.

The dock by the highway turn off was a gull hangout.

A lot of feathers gathered downwind.

A lot of feathers gathered downwind.

The kayakers meanwhile had pulled out and a couple of kids were swimming by another dock.

The kayakers meanwhile had pulled out and a couple of kids were swimming by another dock.

Meanwhile I had found out with our wrapped up car GPS that I can row about 3 mph, top out at 4 .3 mph, and can't row and take pictures at the same time. The other photographer on the lake had a paddler too as her equipment was not a modest pocket camera.

Meanwhile I had found out with our wrapped up car GPS that I can row about 3 mph, top out at 4 .3 mph, and can’t row and take pictures at the same time. The other photographer on the lake had a paddler too as her equipment was not a modest pocket camera.

P9140042

P9140044

P9140047

I loaded up the boat, strimmed the grass where it had been, and loaded it on the vertical cart .

I loaded up the boat, strimmed the grass where it had been, and loaded it on the vertical cart at home.

P9140050

home for repairs; the purpose of the vertical cart is to move the boat through narrow garden paths.

home for maintenance; the purpose of the vertical cart is to move the boat through narrow garden paths. (Parked temporarily on Nora’s lawn)

We postponed eating the salmon for one day, as I had it strongly in mind to have a fire (with sausages) that night while the weather was still hot and not windy. Warm, still evenings are rare here (or have been in past summers; that may have permanently changed). If we could acquire a fire ring grill top, we could cook salmon and other delicacies outdoors but for now we are limited to food that can be toasted on a campfire fork (sausages and buns, and marshmallows for Allan).

starting the fire

starting the fire

Allan managed to start the fire with no paper at all; I usually use wads and wads of newspaper before I can get one going.

Allan's photo:  "NO paper, NO starters, just cedar and a lighter"

Allan’s photo: “NO paper, NO starters, just cedar and a lighter” (and alder wood)

garden in evening light

garden in evening light

Smokey was happy to join us near the fire.

Smokey was happy to join us near the fire.

Stipa gigantea, my favourite grass.

Stipa gigantea, my favourite grass (backed with river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’).

Tomorrow, I would have to do extensive watering as the garden had become distressed in the heat.

Persicaria 'Firetail' lying almost flat

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ lying almost flat

honeysuckle looking sad

honeysuckle looking sad

The fire burned bright and clean with no smoke.

The fire burned bright and clean with no smoke.

We wished that Kathleen had not had to go back to the big city, as last week when she came for a campfire, we had gotten rained out. This particular fire was the most perfect one of the summer.

the perfect fire

the perfect fire

and the experience we had hoped to share with Kathleen of watching the coals burn out

and the experience we had hoped to share with Kathleen of watching the coals burn out

Monday, 15 September 2014

We have become slackers, me more than Allan as he still goes out to do the necessary Ilwaco watering on a weekend. Having spent a day at the cottage tour, I felt a strong need for two days at home so declared Monday a day off. That will make this another TWO day work week for me as I am leaving Thursday, fate willing, for a trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

The day began shockingly hot again. I was thrilled when it soon cooled down and I could see fog in the distance.

the delicious sight of fog at the east end of Lake Street

the delicious sight of fog at the east end of Lake Street

a pause to admire Azara microphylla variegata by the front porch

a pause to admire Azara microphylla variegata by the front porch

It was a workday for our friend J9, who stopped by after work for a visit and to get some vegetables.

sent her home with some tomatoes and some Yukon gold potatoes...and a little piece of fresh salmon just right for her dinner.

sent her home with some tomatoes and some Yukon gold potatoes…and a little piece of fresh salmon just right for her dinner.

Allan went out to water Larry and Robert’s garden, our volunteer Post Office garden, and the Ilwaco planters, all of which are one-person jobs.

cosmos at the post office

cosmos at the post office

He marvelled:  "A planter with new soil and next to a field hit with Round Up still manages to get  a dandelion & a chickweed"

He marvelled: “A planter with new soil and next to a field hit with Round Up still manages to get a dandelion & a chickweed”

(The vacant lot downtown is treated with Round Up by its owner, which we think is a shame as it used to grow wild beach peas.)

This was the planter that was vandalized in later summer, then moved and replanted.

This was the planter that was vandalized in later summer, then moved and replanted.

the planter by Larry's Antique Gallery Too! with vigorous nasturtium

the planter by Larry’s Antique Gallery Too! with vigorous nasturtium

My big garden plan for the weekend had been to chop up some of the garden debris pile and put it into the compost bins. We have decided to no longer collect kitchen compost from a nearby café for several reasons, one being that the compost bins stink up the garden in hot weather, one being that the amount of time spent collecting and processing takes more work hours than the cost of a load of dairy manure, and another being that a neighbour had….RATS…and the cats brought in a rat the other day, an ominous sign. With four plastic bins of kitchen compost, three of which could be breached by a determined critter, we were perhaps asking for trouble.

The first day was too hot to do the garden debris project and the second day I was just too darn lazy.

After watering, Allan made a delicious salmon dinner with Phil’s salmon, and some of our Yukon Golds and tomatoes (and storebought everything else).

I try to eat a bit of sauerkraut every day as it is supposed to be healthy.

I try to eat a bit of sauerkraut every day as it is supposed to be healthy.

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 1 July 2014

my morning

I had to get up early! Before eight AM! My inner clock does not allow me to sleep early, so I had maybe six hours. Nancy arrived with a double iced mocha in hand for me, and I ate a tahini sandwich on the way as had no time for breakfast. The reason was to go to Astoria with Nancy, Stephen, and John to be on the Diggin’ in the Dirt radio show to help promote the July 19th Music in the Gardens tour. Stephen and John’s is one of the ten tour gardens.

KMUN radio is housed here.

KMUN radio is housed here.

detail

Stephen, Nancy, and John

Stephen, Nancy, and John

view from the KMUN waiting room

view from the KMUN waiting room

Pam from my favourite local collectors nursery, Back Alley Gardens, joined us for the show to promote her Seaside walking tour which will take place on July 27 (sadly for me, it starts at 8 AM). The organizer of the Astoria garden tour was there also; it’s July 12th and I am very sorry to miss it this year as we will be at the Bloggers Fling in Portland. I wish there was some way I could have a sneak peek at the gardens.

After the show, we all walked a few blocks to have coffee together at the Blue Scorcher Café.

on the way, we saw goats...

on the way, we saw goats…

a hillside pasture for city goats!

a hillside pasture for city goats!

and gnarled old rhodo trunks reminiscent of some of the very old rhodos in Stephen and John's bayside garden.

and gnarled old rhodo trunks reminiscent of some of the very old rhodos in Stephen and John’s bayside garden.

walking and looking

walking and looking

My left calf had felt absolutely seized up with pain when I woke briefly at three AM, yet by midmorning had recovered enough that I was able to walk up and down hills in Astoria with not much trouble.

We gazed upon this because Stephen and John are conifer men...one more than the other, I think perhaps.

We gazed upon this because Stephen and John are conifer men…one more than the other, I think perhaps.

wild cucumber vine

wild cucumber vine

at the Blue Scorcher

at the Blue Scorcher

Pam, John, Stephen, Nancy

Pam, John, Stephen, Nancy

Pam's delicious looking brunch (some sort of curry soup); I simply had a chocolate croissant.

Pam’s delicious looking brunch (some sort of curry soup); I simply had a chocolate croissant.

On the way back, we happened upon a George Schenkian public garden that I admire very much. Jessica Schlief’s garden that she made by piling soil on top of asphalt to make beds has been here for years.

roses inside an ornate fence

roses inside an ornate fence

Pam and John.  (Stephen and John buy cool plants from her nursery.)

Pam and John. (Stephen and John buy cool plants from her nursery.)

1460

fence1

inside

inside

poppy and lily

poppy and lily

roses

roses and, I think…feverfew perhaps

bee balm

bee balm

My favourite ornamental grass, Stipa gigantea

My favourite ornamental grass, Stipa gigantea

sunflowers

sunflowers

The potted yew was a hit.

The potted yew was a hit.

garden admiration

garden admiration

John and Stephen

John and Stephen

all grown in raised beds atop unbroken asphalt

all grown in raised beds atop unbroken asphalt

Alllum schubertii

Alllum schubertii

allium2

allium shadow

allium shadow

The day had gotten bright and very hot. Back at KMUN to get the vehicles, I admired a bumper sticker.

I SOO dislike beach driving except for litter clean up and surf rescue.

I SOOO dislike beach driving except for litter clean up and surf rescue.

As Nancy and I drove back to the Peninsula, she expressed a desire to peek at the very secret house that I had dreamed about on Saturday. So we did. I did not pine for it as much, mostly because I have realized I would have to have a deer fence there, and it has no fencing at all.

Meanwhile I was on the phone with Allan, who informed me that it was very, very hot, that he had been sweating while starting his work day by watering Larry and Robert’s garden, and that I might not want to work. I could feel it, but thought surely we could accomplish our project, which was to weed one of the Long Beach parking lot berms.

I took time to stop at Nancy’s to meet her new chickens, still housed in the living room till their feathers grow in.

chickhouse

very curious

very curious

a peek at Nancy's veg garden

a peek at Nancy’s veg garden

her purple peas

her purple peas

She's very pleased about these Liberty apples.

She’s very pleased about these Liberty apples.

alliums in the flower garden we made there

allium albopilosum in the flower garden we made there

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

After the brief garden stroll, I called Allan and said that it was indeed TOO TOO hot, and would he come and get me and we would go home and go back out to work in the evening. After dumping the weeds he had already collected, he came over and we all sat on Nancy and Phil’s porch and drank ice water for awhile…and just as Allan and I were about to depart, a faintly cool breeze wafted from the north and I thought that perhaps we could go back to work after all.

Allan’s morning

This is how hot it was (so unusual for the beach…although seems to be ominously less unusual lately):

He saw this man while driving through Long Beach.

He saw this man while driving through Long Beach.

92 F!!

92 F!!

another fellow lounging in the shade by one of our planters.

another fellow lounging in the shade by one of our planters.

a before photo of the weedy parking lot berm

a before photo of the weedy parking lot (not really a) berm

He began by pruning back the overhanging roses

He began by pruning back the overhanging roses

then tackled the horrible mess in this garden for which we had had not time yet this year.

then tackled the horrible mess in this garden for which we had had not time yet this year.

Our afternoon

After we decided to get back to work despite the heat, we paused at Fifth Street park for a restroom stop and I checked the nearby planters; amazingly, there were still damp enough to not have to be watered yet.

The city crew was mowing, surely glad the temperature had dropped a bit.

The city crew was mowing, surely glad the temperature had dropped a bit.

park

I joined Allan in the berm weeding.

Yikes!

Yikes!

I had accidentally packed the wrong homi, the one that is too straight and springy.

I had accidentally packed the wrong homi, the one that is too straight and springy.

I tried the double tool but it did not have enough oomph.

I tried the double tool but it did not have enough oomph.

I borrowed Allan's ho mi that had enough oomph.  (Ho Mi, Korean Hand Plow, Zen Weeder, E-Z digger)

I borrowed Allan’s ho mi that had enough oomph. (Ho Mi, Korean Hand Plow, Zen Weeder, E-Z digger)

weeds!

weeds!

awful

awful

a nightmare indeed

a nightmare indeed

We had been hinting around that maybe a city parks intern could do this area…and finally it had gotten so bad I could not bear to leave it alone.

certainly an improvement!

certainly an improvement!

The main problem is the soil is tight and difficult, so lots of weed roots were left behind.

a battered looking weeding job

a battered looking weeding job

not great at close inspection

not great at close inspection

with some pockets of weeds that were so daunting we left them there for now

with some pockets of weeds that were so daunting we left them there for now

It is...better.

It is…better.

There are some good plants in this garden that may distract people from the rough rootiness at ground level.

Rosa glauca and Stipa gigantea

Rosa glauca and Stipa gigantea

Rosa glauca and Stipa gigantea

Rosa glauca and Stipa gigantea

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

assorted shrubs

assorted shrubs

Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle)

Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle)

Even the horrible phormium

Even the horrible phormium

had redeemed itself by putting out a flower.

had redeemed itself by putting out a flower.

Across the parking lot, a garden at the Oceanic RV Park was brimming with potted astilbes.

a very nice little garden on the north wall

a very nice little garden on the north wall

Home, so tired from such a tedious job and the early morning, I got back to garden tour blogging. I glimpsed from my window that the sky promised a good sunset and then got so absorbed in writing that I forgot to look again. Judy four doors down probably won’t mind that I show you the sunset photos that she posted on Facebook.

sunset on Lake Street

sunset

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Garden tour season inspires me to do a lot of slacking on actual work.  It will show up when I total the end of month profits!

We began the day at the Red Barn and Diane’s garden.  Diane and Larry’s dog Misty, a good friend of mine, could not wait to see us and came across the field to the barn.

Misty

Misty

a horse at the Red Barn

a horse at the Red Barn

We fertilized the containers by Diane’s porch…

porch planters

porch planters

I am happy with them and also with the garden by the entry drive.

with Stipa gigantea

with Stipa gigantea

I am not very happy with the street-side garden, especially when I compare it to Gene’s.  Larry has been doing a good job of watering.  It is mulched by the owners with cranberry mulch.  I feel it needs some dairy manure.  With a great big free pile of horse manure next door at the barn, that might feel like an excessive purchase, but I know from experience that horse manure brings in many weeds and therefore increases labour.

needs help!

needs help!

I’ll add more lavenders and santolina this fall….

Next, we skived off work and went to two of the gardens that would be on the edible tour in order to take enticing pre-tour photos for the Facebook page.

First we stopped at Kim and Andrea Patten’s garden on the bay.  Kim is the head of the Cranberry Research Station and Andrea has the Wholesome Hearth baked goods booth at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market (in Long Beach on Fridays, 4-7 PM).

Patten garden

Patten garden

deer fenced

deer fenced Patten veg garden

shallots hanging on the porch

shallots hanging on the Patten porch

an amazing apple orchard

an amazing apple orchard at Patten garden

apples

apples, Patten garden

The owners were not there so I did not feel I should poke my nose around to the more private bay side of the garden.

Next we went way north on Sandridge almost to Oysterville to get some pre-tour photos at “Lavender And”, a small commercial lavender farm.  Again, the owner was not to be found so we did not go into the area around the home.

geometric lavender

geometric lavender at Lavender And

dramatic reflection

dramatic reflection

And then, a run of work working from north to south….

Marilyn's garden

Marilyn’s garden

Cosmos 'Cranberry Double Click'

Cosmos ‘Cranberry Double Click’

Knautia macedonica, Phygelius, Salvia viridis

Knautia macedonica, Phygelius, Salvia viridis at Marilyn’s

Cosmos 'Happy Ring' at Marilyn's

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ at Marilyn’s

Wiegardt Studio Gallery garden

Wiegardt Studio Gallery garden

lily at Wiegardt Gallery

lily at Wiegardt Gallery

Oman Builders Supply garden in Ocean Park

Oman Builders Supply garden in Ocean Park

We skipped Klipsan Beach Cottages for later in the week and headed all the way down to Long Beach to water the planters.  I had barely emerged from our car when I saw three boys picking dahlias from one of the planters.  “Hey! No picking!!” came my usual cry.  They shuffled a bit and one said “My mom’s getting married and we want to take her some flowers.”  That’s a touching story indeed.  I said, “Look, there are three of you, right?  Now imagine if every group of three people in town picked themselves a bouquet…How many flowers would be left?”  They shuffled some more.  I said “Congratulations to your mom, and you can give her what you have already picked, but don’t pick any more.”  One boy opened a plastic bag to put the flowers in…and there was half a bag more of flowers in there.  “So where did you get those?” I asked.  “Oh, not from the planters, from our own garden!” was the hasty reply.  Odd how the flowers looked exactly like the ones I had in planters further down the street.  I just sighed and moved on, as did they.

off to mom's wedding?

off to mom’s wedding? with a bag of flowers

Is there any point in even asking people to stop picking?  Perhaps it will sink in and save someone else’s flowers in the future.  Perhaps not.

the daily painted sage photo

the daily painted sage photo

Next: garden touring with the garden club: a Music in the Gardens tour reprise…

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »