Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Summerhouse’

Saturday, 23 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Thompson Garden, Edmonds

I loved the trees in the front garden; I am assuming they are paper white birch.  I overheard someone say they are not seen much anymore.  If true, I wonder why?

Old tools adorned the fence as one walked toward the back garden:

the gates to the back garden

The paths were narrow and soon dropped off into small flights of stone steps.

I pondered the railing-less steps to the deck.

Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’. I have always wanted one of these.

I was feeling kind of lightheaded so I did not cross the bridge to the greenhouse.  There was an alligator in the pond below!

I did find my way up onto the deck to see a cute little garden shed.

Allan’s photo

From the deck, I had great views of the enviable upper pond.  The water comes under the fence from the property next door.  How delightful. It made me miss my much smaller spring fed natural pond at my previous home in Ilwaco.

across the pond, the greenhouse and the summerhouse

I was not the only person with a cane just observing from the deck.

Many people were on the bridge and stairs to the summer house.

Allan in the blue shirt

I knew Allan would take good photos for me of all the lower garden…and here they are.

the tiers of Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’, the wedding cake tree

waterfall

the glass house

the glorious interior of the summerhouse

the side fence

If I could explore this garden on my own, I’d be able to find a way to all the dreamy areas.  I could happily live in that summerhouse.

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 4 November 2014

I was not to have a block of time to get all the bulbs sorted at once, as the weather on Tuesday turned out to be glorious planting weather. It proved satisfying to knock a few bulb planting jobs off the list this soon.

Ilwaco

We began with our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office, just pulling out the toppled cosmos. I did not yet have the bulbs sorted for this little garden.

before

before

after

after..no time to weed

We pulled cosmos out of the boat at the Time Enough Books and Purly Shell garden and planted yellow tulips: Texas Gold, West Point, Akebono, Christmas Orange, and Florette, with a front edge of Christmas Orange and some Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’.

at the port

at the port

tulip photos from vanengelen.com

West Point, Florette, Texas Gold, Christmas Orange, Akebono: tulip photos from vanengelen.com

The Depot Restaurant

Seagulls lined up on the roof to see if they could snag any tasty looking bulbs before we buried them.

the Depot roof

the Depot roof

Debbie H. tracked us down with plenty of help from my end and the last of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that we’ve been lugging around since removing them from Jo’s garden. The plants will end up next spring at the Master Gardener’s spring seminar plant sale. I was so distracted by meeting Debbie’s sweet dog that I didn’t take photos of anyone but him.

Ralph...begging for pets, not defending the vehicle

Ralph…begging for pets, not defending the vehicle

no garden photos, just Ralph!

no garden photos, just Ralph!

Depot bulbs spread sheet; my spellchecker objects to much about bulb names!:

Screen Shot 2014-11-05 at 7.37.43 PM

 

Long Beach

We pulled another couple of cosmos from Fifth Street Park and even though I like to leave ornamental grasses up all winter, Allan chopped two down that will interfere with the city crew’s ease of putting up the lighted Christmas sea serpent later this month.

grass

chopping down the second grass

Meanwhile, the city crew was digging holes in the garden, something to do with the pipes. Glad it did not happen in midsummer!

a few of the crew

a few of the crew

We moved a block east to plant some bulbs in Erin’s Summerhouse vacation rental garden…yellow ones, like the selection that we used at Time Enough Books.

plantng and a bit of weeding at Summerhouse

plantng and a bit of weeding at Summerhouse

Summerhouse, available in all seasons.

Summerhouse, available in all seasons.

Across the parking lot, fall colour glowed in the parking lot garden.

telephot; house behind is not that close.

telephot; house behind is not that close.

A block north at Veterans Field, I laid out all the bulbs in the new Senator Sid Snyder memorial garden bed. A flock of gulls immediately gathered and Allan and I had a bit of a time trying to keep them from stealing bulbs before we got them planted. Allan’s photos:

bird

birds

2birds

3birds

flying

trying to look casual

trying to look casual

This bed got red, white, and blue bulbs. A partial list:

Narcissus ‘Thalia’, ‘Toto’, ‘Sailboat’, ‘Ice Follies’, ‘Dreamlight’. Tulip ‘White Parrot’, ‘Rococo’, ‘The First’, ‘Peppermint Stick’. Muscari ‘Valerie Finnis’, ‘Superstar’, ‘Mount Hood’. Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’. Crocus ‘Twilight’ and ‘Spring Beauty’. Fritillaria meleagris alba.

Over in the Veterans Field flag pavilion garden, where we weeded and planted some of the Brodiaea, a reblooming Eryngium is a sign of our mild weather.

I have never seen Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' rebloom in fall.

I have never seen Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ rebloom in fall.

We dumped our load of debris and then headed to the Anchorage for the last hour before early dark.

The Anchorage Cottages

While Allan planted tulips and narcissi in assorted pots, I planted little, early blooming bulbs in the windowboxes. We can’t plant tulips in the pots in the center courtyard anymore now that the deer have started coming in. We could tell by some nipped viburnums that deer are poking around next to the office, too, but we hope that some tulips in the pots by the office window might escape unscathed next spring.

My cunning plan is to do the windowboxes by the method we used at Klipsan Beach Cottages. We will inset plastic inserts with bulbs for the spring, then take out the inserts and replace with new inserts of annuals for the summer. However, when manager Beth bought the liners (plastic windowboxes), the store was out of enough matching ones, so two are of a different size. The other dilemma is that they are not big enough for the length of the four windowboxes, so all eight will be needed just to do the bulbs.

I planted them up in the bed of the trailer.

I planted them up in the bed of the trailer.

It made my brain hurt so much to work with the different lengths and with a seam being at the center (where two inserts will meet in the middle) that I lost my ability to do a symmetrical planting and it all ended up terribly random.

the little bulbs

the little bulbs

There’s some sort of pattern but nothing like what I planned. I hope we can get four longer inserts that are evenly matched by next fall, and I might redo the bulbs in a couple of years. There is a bit of a pattern left in the planting and I am sure it will look lovely. The little bulbs I used were:

Tulips ‘Peppermint Stick’, ‘Ice Stick’, sylvestris, batalinii ‘Bright Gem’ and bakeri ‘Lilac Beauty’. Crocus ‘Spring Beauty’ and ‘Twilight’. Iris reticulata ‘Cantab. Iris histriodes ‘Katharine Hodgkin’. Fritillaria meleagris (guinea hen flower). Narcissus ‘Pipit’, ‘Baby Moon’, ‘Itzim’.

There are many little bulbs to choose from; I just chose from the batch I got this year. I’m regretting not having ordered any snowdrops as they would have been perfect for these windowboxes.

Lilac Wonder is my favourite of the little species tulips; here's a grand photo of it from Van Engelen bulbs.

Lilac Wonder is my favourite of the little species tulips; here’s a grand photo of it from Van Engelen bulbs.

We got home by 5 PM and by 5:30 I was back to sorting bulbs. I did not think there was any chance I would get them all done. I seemed to hit some sort of stride after awhile (thanks to a nice snack plate and 2 cups of tea from Allan), and kept going non stop till 10:30 PM and miraculously managed to sort down to the very last bulb, 4,307 in all! I barely had the strength for a light dinner and an episode of True Blood.

Wednesday, 5 November 2014

Today was the day of the bulb spreadsheets for each job, thanks to glorious rain. I applied myself with few interruptions. I do enjoy making a good, aphabetized, and tidy spreadsheet and making sure that all the money adds up right. Our clients and friends pool in whatever they want to spend on bulbs, from $20 on up, and it’s my task to make sure that I sort out the right amount for each person. I’m happy to report that my scribbled notes while sorting all translated into batches that came within a dollar of what each person wanted to spend.

Meanwhile, Allan ran a few errands including picking up some bulbs from Erin so that we can mix them in with the batch we sorted for her. He took a few photos at her garden:

back porch garden

back porch garden

Her back porch garden looks so nice and tidy, and will make a great spot for the sort of bulb you want to view up close.

the garden boat on the west lawn

the garden boat on the west lawn; garden clean up awaits us.

The garden bed west of the boat will get lots of small narcissi. No tulips will go out there because:

the deer live here!

the deer live here!

photo 5

Tomorrow may be another rainy day. It does not promise to be a bookish one as we have various social plans…

 

Read Full Post »

Monday, 25 November, 2013

As the weather continues to be bright and warm, I am not envious of the sleeping cats when I leave the house for work.

Smokey and his mom Mary are awfully cute.

Smokey and his mom Mary are awfully cute.

I had looked hopefully on the porch for the delayed shipment of 200 tulips that had been supposed to arrive on Friday, and without which the three last bulb planting jobs and the happy end of bulb time was frustratingly delayed. No bulbs! My back up plan, to mulch instead, would depend on whether or not Raymond was available at the Planter Box to load us with cow manure. Yes, he was!

First we had to unload yesterday’s debris from the trailer. The clean debris went into one of the piles in the back garden, giving me a chance to check on it; I had not had much free daylight time lately.

back garden today

back garden today

The last glorious dahlia is done.

The last glorious dahlia is done.

All the hardy Fuchsias have their leaves crisped by frost. This makes me sad as they usually last much longer.

Fuchsias and Verbascum

Fuchsias and Verbascum

With an empty trailer, we went straight to The Planter Box. While getting ready to load the “Bovine Fiber Digest” (their official name for the processed dairy manure), Raymond told me that we are one of the two warmest spots in the country today: Florida at 70 something degrees and SW Washington Coast in the 60s. I had already changed to my summer shirt.

first load of cow fiber

11:30 AM: first load of cow fiber

Our first target: The Anchorage Cottages.

Anchorage, garden near office, before

Anchorage, garden near office, before

after

after

lovely cow poo

lovely cow poo

Courtyard garden, before, with more of the low glaring sun we are having daily.

Courtyard garden, before, with more of the low glaring sun we are having daily.

courtyard after

courtyard after

I kept the mulch a bit back from the edge so the little, well, turdlets, won’t roll out onto the nice clean courtyard. So the contrast between old sandy soil and the new rich look shows well here:

contrast

contrast

We had enough mulch to do part of the beds by the south end of the cottage complex, as well. Then, back to The Planter Box. I was determined to get as much mulching done as possible since Raymond was there all day long; when he is off on a landscaping job, there is no one to load the fiber.

12:44 PM:  second load

12:44 PM: second load

We had a problem when leaving the Planter Box: The speedometer, tachometer, and gas tank, er, thingie (how much gas is left) all went to zero. It was not the alternator, as the radio and the indicator that shows our miles per gallon still worked. It added considerable worry, in my mind at least. The day had been going so well and I hoped to get three loads of mulch distributed without mechanical problems bringing us to a halt. I especially dread a breakdown with a heavy trailer of mulch attached.

When we got to Long Beach, the second load (which I decided to not refer to as “load number two”) went here:

the newly redone bed in frying pan park, Fifth Street in Long Beach

the newly redone bed in frying pan park, Fifth Street in Long Beach

Hmm, I think that garbage can brings down the tone. It is a cute enough garbage can, but having the bag showing is not quite right. However, it is Not My Problem, and it will not show as much when a bench gets put back next to it. [Next day I learned that it is going to be removed.]

We also added a nice layer of cow poo to the small garden bed on the south side of Summer House, the yellow house you can see in the background of the above photo. And joy! When Allan turned the van back on, all the meters worked as they should. I had been hoping that turning if off and on again would do the trick.

Next we added a nice layer of Cow Fiber at the welcome sign. (Last week we had mulched all three of these areas with Soil Energy from Peninsula Landscape Supply.)

welcome sign with a double whammy of two kinds of mulch

welcome sign with a double whammy of two kinds of mulch

To my delight, the four scoops of cow fiber extended far enough to put a thick layer on the north and east side beds at the Depot Restaurant.

lusciousness at the Depot

lusciousness at the Depot (north side of deck)

east side of dining room

east side of dining room

Back to The Planter Box for load number three!

2:20 PM: Raymond tidies up the Cow Fiber pile after loading our trailer.

2:20 PM: Raymond tidies up the Cow Fiber pile after loading our trailer.

By the way, The Planter Box has a nice selection of bulbs for those who might still need some. It is not too late to plant; around here, you can plant bulbs well into December.

bulbs

bulbs

Just to keep the suspense strong about whether or not we would accomplish offloading three loads of mulch today, the engine light came on in the van. My heart sank when I came back outside from paying and saw Allan with his head under the hood. Whatever he did worked. The light went off and all was well as we drove to the Port of Ilwaco.

and at the Port of Ilwaco

at the Port of Ilwaco

We mulched the end of the bed where we had weeded and planted new plants last week.

bed, with empty wheelbarrow

bed, with empty wheelbarrow

And we mulched down at the Port Office on the new-this-past-year south side bed.

3:07 PM:  Oh, how I wanted the glaring blinding sun to go behind Cape Disappointment!

3:07 PM: Oh, how I wanted the glaring blinding sun to go behind Cape Disappointment!

Then we headed over to Mayor Mike’s garden at the south end of Lake Street. There, we used much less mulch than I had thought the garden would need. The beds are quite narrow. I forgot to take a picture, but I did take one of two of my canine friends walking by.

Dwight walking Larry and Big River.

Dwight walking Larry and Big River.

The dogs had had a great time at the riverside park on the east end of town.

With plenty of cow fiber left, we unexpectedly had enough to do more mulching down at the port along Howerton Street.

beds along Howerton north of the Port Office

beds along Howerton north of the Port Office

I do hope to find time Friday or even on Thanksgiving day to do some trimming of the plants here, as this weekend is the first day of the Saturday Christmas Market in a storefront just at the end of these beds (next to Time Enough Books, where the red Christmas Market sign is on the left).

More luscious mulch should help hold moisture next summer.

More luscious mulch should help hold moisture next summer.

We had just enough left to add a smattering of mulch by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner restaurant at the west end of Howerton.

a Jade Frost Eryngium still blooming, albeit sideways

a Jade Frost Eryngium still blooming, albeit sideways

looking east

looking east

and north

and north

more jet trails

pots ready for crabbing

On the drive down to Ilwaco, I had seen a disconcerting sight in the Fifth Street park’s waterfall quadrant: The Gunnera was DOWN. We did not stop for fear we would not have gotten the manure offloaded before dark, but now we went back to Long Beach to deal with the problem.

unsightly frosted Gunnera

unsightly frosted Gunnera by Benson’s By The Beach Restaurant

I saw a Little Brown Bird dining on the Gunnera seeds!

very busy

very busy

Little Brown Bird

Little Brown Bird

bird

At the back of the park, the lacecap Hydrangea had also been hit hard by unseasonal frost. It is a darn shame because the frost was followed by such summery weather and warmer nights.

a limp hydrangea

a limp hydrangea

We cut back the dead leaves of the Gunnera and tucked some of them over the crown in hope of protecting it from future frost. The seeds are still there for the Little Brown Bird.

Gunnera tucked in for winter

Gunnera tucked in for winter

Here’s something ever so satisfying: The white board in the kitchen tonight.

Today's accomplishment! before and after

Today’s accomplishment! before and after

Also satisfying: the last bulbs came and are now sorted and ready to plant tomorrow. We have one large and one medium bulb batch to plant and two little afterthought batches of fifteen each. When that is done, and The Boreas Inn and Andersen’s RV Park are mulched, one side of the project board will be blank. I am going to shift mulching Jo’s over to the planned work for next February! Then we just have to deal with the list of last clean ups (weeding and cutting plants back) for each garden:

here they all are

here they all are

Jo’s is a big one, as is Long Beach.

And then staycation will begin! Unless….unless….we decide to put in a big garden bed at Erin’s place before our winter break.

Read Full Post »

The health difficulties of early 2002 are reflected in the paucity of photos from our jobs during the first part of the year.  I plugged along on our regular jobs, and had to cancel taking on the gardens at Blackwood Cottages because on my own for the first part of the year, I could barely keep up with what we already had.

Andersen’s RV Park

Narcissi in the new west side garden

Narcissi in the new west side garden

For a few years, I was able to grow tulips in the Andersen’s gardens, and then first the voles and then the deer discovered them.

Tulips in the new garden.

Tulips in the new garden.

Anchorage Cottages

Anchorage office garden with Ceanothus in bloom.  It is three times that size now!

Anchorage office garden with Ceanothus in bloom. It is three times that size now!

The Shelburne Inn

front garden with tulips and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

front garden with tulips and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

back garden of herbs with bright tulip display

back garden of herbs with bright tulip display

China Beach Retreat

naturalized narcissi

naturalized narcissi

bulbs and cerinthe in the deck planter

bulbs and cerinthe in the deck planter

Summerhouse

tulips of May

tulips of May

Klipsan Beach Cottages

I was there every week during the peak gardening season, but I cannot find a photo that is definitely from 2002.

The Sandcastle

I swiped this photo of Don Woodcock’s Sandcastle house from Funbeach.com because all I have are photos of the garden and not the stunning house.

The Sandcastle

The Sandcastle

Since Don died, it has fallen into disrepair as you can tell by the state of the roof…He always kept it up perfectly.

Along the west fence in 2002, we had a garden of roses and sweetpeas.  Don, in his 70s then, and I would sit on the front porch steps and talk about life.

Sandcastle sweet peas

Sandcastle sweet peas

sc2

sc3

sc4

sc5

Seaview Solstice

Across the street to the west, we had begun to maintain the Seaview Solstice vacation rental house.  Well, more like come in a few times a year to work on the garden.  It was a surprisingly difficult one, being on heavy clay (as was the Sandcastle.  Surprisingly, a vein of clay runs along L Place gardens in Seaview.)

Seaview Solstice (from their website)

Seaview Solstice (from their website)

pink tulips to match the pink Solstice house

pink tulips to match the pink Solstice house

Next:  The City of Long Beach gardens in 2002

Read Full Post »

winter project at Andersen's

winter project at Andersen’s

Andersen’s RV Park

I spent a couple of weeks in the midwinter of 2000-2001 making new garden beds along the west side of the house at Andersen’s RV Park. One of these winters, maybe the previous one, Robert (mostly) and I painted the interiors of most of the Klipsan Beach Cottages. We still could not afford to take the winters off so scrambled for as much offseason work as possible. I still did a lot of the maintenance work alone while Robert welded rebar garden art or did odd jobs. There was still some conflict over the amount of money he spent on beer and cigarettes (over $300 a month), and he may very well have felt the same way over the amount of money I spent on plants (about $300 a year).   We could not dig ourselves out financially, and while it did not bother him, it bothered me greatly.

new Andersen's beds in spring

new Andersen’s beds in spring

later

later

Robert made a driftwood fence to separate the new garden from the playground.

driftwood fence

driftwood fence

Bev’s Seaview Garden

Bev was our first friend on the Peninsula whose cocker spaniel, Kelly, used to visit us at the Sou’wester. This ‘New Dawn’ rose was the remainder of the garden that we had planted back in those days; she had let most of the rest of it return to lawn.

Bev's New Dawn Rose

Bev’s New Dawn Rose

Below:  close up of Bev’s front gate. Her porch signs say in Latin “Small But Just Right” and that the house was built in 1915, and that she moved into it in 1989.

Bev's entryway

Bev’s entryway

She still hired us sometimes to weed the little garden that remained around the porch.

Summerhouse

Summerhouse before

Summerhouse before

and after

and after

It became a longterm rental for awhile and now is a vacation rental again, although a handsome front porch now takes up a large amount of this garden area (and that little tree is huge!)  In 2012, we started working on a small garden area there again.

Bill’s garden

This was our last summer working on Bill’s beach side garden.  We had created it fairly recently, but as with some other gardens, once it had filled in the owner decided to do the maintenance and we haven’t tracked its progress since then.

ornamental grass garden on the dunes

ornamental grass garden on the dunes

southwest corner garden at Bill's house

southwest corner garden at Bill’s house

China Beach Retreat

By 2001,  I had started doing more planting at China Beach Retreat, The Shelburne’s other guesthouse.  Below:  Spring 2001, the batches of narcissi I had planted here and there the previous autumn.

tree with Narcissi at China Beach

tree with Narcissi at China Beach

One of my projects was to clean up along a little stream and plant Siberian and Japanese iris and narcissi.

narcissi planted along a stream

narcissi planted along a stream

along the stream

along the stream

Robert had made the owners this hose hanger with (he hoped, after research online) the Chinese character for water.

"water" hose hanger

“water” hose hanger

I wanted to, and did, make a new garden stretching out to the west of the house.

new garden bed

new garden bed

new garden to west of house, late summer

new garden to west of house, late summer

All summer on and off another gardener had worked with me part time, Carol of “The Elves Did It”, the idea being to give Robert more time to weld. She was camera-shy, but here, in the far distance, you can see her in the new China Beach garden.

China Beach garden in autumn light

China Beach garden in autumn light

Shelburne Inn

I continued to work at the Shelburne Inn, still on a mission of adding more interesting plants to the garden.  An awful lot of Greek Oregano grew along the sidewalk beds and I was trying to thin it out, although it did look pretty in bloom.

Shelburne Inn

Shelburne Inn

Robert took this photo of Cerinthe major purpurascens and Erisymum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in the Shelburne front garden.

Cerinthe

Cerinthe

Shelburne

Shelburne with Clematis
front garden 2001

front garden 2001

Below: The Shelburne, 2001, with a cloud of cosmos, which had become my signature plant.

Cosmos

Cosmos

Agapanthus and Allium seedheads

Agapanthus and Allium seedheads

Sandcastle

Just west of the Sou’wester at Don Woodcock’s big house with a tower called The Sandcastle, we had put in a new garden along the west fence, planted his favourite rose (Double Delight) and a lot of tulips.

Read Full Post »