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Posts Tagged ‘sweet peas’

Monday, 16 March 2015

On March 16th, the day after Allan got home from the Sylvia Beach Hotel, the crabbers at the gear shed next door were tarping down their pots for the season.

DSC01211

DSC01212

During the time I was gone to the Sylvia Beach Hotel, Allan had (bless him!) done some of the gardening work. On March 16th, he finished the Big Pop Out in Long Beach, a task completion that had been eluding us.

March 16: before

March 16: before

after

after, rugosa roses controlled (for now) all along the fence and a weed infested kinnickinick removed

before and after...impressive!

before and after…impressive!

his load of debris

his load of debris

species tulips in the big pop out

species tulips in the big pop out

Thursday, 19th March 2015

(You can read about Allan’s March 18th boating trip in yesterday’s post.)

On March 19th, he tackled the dreaded weeding of the Bolstadt Beach Approach blocks-long garden and felt discouraged by how long it took him to accomplish this much; it’s a horribly hard job:

P3190002

before

Three hours later.  I personally think that is pretty fast and efficient.

Three hours later. I personally think that is pretty fast and efficient.

I arrived back from the Sylvia Beach Hotel in the early evening and I have to admit that after my five quiet bookish days, we watched a two hour episode of Survivor in the evening.  The cats were ever so pleased to see me…when they woke up.

Smokey and Mary

Smokey and Mary

I opened my birthday package from Montana Mary; she had given me SIXTY presents, or tried to (she wrote that she may have lost count) including each individual piece chocolate from two fine chocolatiers (one from Wyoming and one from Bozeman, Montana).

presents from Montana Mary

presents from Montana Mary

Mary says “both are owned by charming people who produce marvelous confections!”  (A couple of days later, I got another little package from her, some “chocolate” seeds from Chocolate flower farms: chocolate colored nasturtiums and chocolate cherry tomatoes.)

Allan made delicious muffins from the flour.

IMG_1904

Before I’d gone on my trip, Allan had given me a set of books relating to my Green Lake neighbourhood Seattle childhood.  Of course, I had been too immersed in the Sylvia Beach Hotel room journals to read them.  They still awaited my perusal.

IMG_6828

My old friend Shaz, now an Oregonian but who once lived by the bay where years ago I had made a garden for her, sent art supplies:

inspirational

inspirational

Friday, 20 March 2015

view from our north windows

view from our north windows

On my first full day back, I was ever so pleased at torrents of rain because it gave me the opportunity to download and start processing all the photos from my stay at the Sylvia Beach Hotel.  The cats had been so glad to see me last night and sat right by me.

Smokey and Mary

Smokey and Mary

In the evening, we were joined at the Cove Restaurant by Carol and J9 and Kathleen for a belated celebration of my 60th birthday, since I had spent my birthday itself with Carol at the Sylvia Beach Hotel. Bill and Susie of the Boreas Inn stopped by but could not stay as they were checking in some guests that evening.  I took my new camera to dinner; not a good choice, as the old camera known as Spot, which takes bad outdoor photos, is the one that takes good indoor ones.  As we drove north in the rainy dark through Long Beach, I could see deadheads (dead flowers, not lounging hippies) in the planters and felt some small urgency about work.

Allan's photo: We had a table right by the fire.

Allan’s photo: We had a table right by the fire.

Carol and Kathleen at dinner

Carol and Kathleen at dinner

an appetizer of five "prawns solo", the perfect number for our group

an appetizer of five “prawns solo”, the perfect number for our group

Carol's bahn mi sandwich, my steak salad

Carol’s bahn mi sandwich, my steak salad

presents!

presents!

From J9: Catnip Murders art print by an Astoria artist; from Kathleen: Harper Lee in large print and my favourite tea (Earl Grey) and some Nestle’s Crunch and peanut butter cups.  The candy is a shoutout to our fun time at Halloween, when she helped us give out candy and learned my favourites from the Halloween mixed chocolates bag.  From Susie: a pretty little purse with some fancy lip balm inside and a date to take us out to lunch on Sunday!

from Allan, a Hello Kitty gardening set!

from Allan, a Hello Kitty gardening set! for one of my plant tables

It had been an extravagant birthday week (and was not quite over, with the lunch date with Susie and Bill coming up).  However, the weather was due to change and I seriously had to get back to work.

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As I continue to catch up with the work blog….

July 30

We begin at the Port where the garden at Time Enough Books needs some water.

I admire the Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ which is at its peak in the gardens on the north side of the Port Office.

looking east

looking east

looking west

looking west

close up

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Then…on to Gene’s garden in south Long Beach.  It is still looking very good from the tour, but I am going to be guiding a garden club tour there on August 7, so we want to make sure it is deadheaded thoroughly to keep the cosmos going.  (I have no idea why I write some posts in present and some in past tense, if any editor types are wondering.)

front corner of street-side garden

front (SW) corner of street-side garden

painted sage at east end of street-side garden

painted sage at east end of street-side garden

I never tire of painted sage and hope my 50? readers don’t either!

looking east

looking east

I spy a hummingbird on the Crocosmia 'Lucifer'!

I spy a hummingbird on the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’!

garden detail

garden detail

in the courtyard

in the courtyard

Gene's upcycled pallet composter and how it opens at the base

Gene’s upcycled pallet composter and how it opens at the base

courtyard table

courtyard table

Gene planted this Farfugium.

Gene planted this Farfugium on the shady courtyard wall.

looking south in the courtyard

looking south in the courtyard

Some fragrant lilies would be amazing along the east fence of this courtyard.  Gene would have to diligently protect the new sprouts from slugs.  The scent would fill up the space.

From the outside, just a hint of the courtyard's beauty

From the outside, just a hint of the courtyard’s beauty

Next, we go to Jo’s, also with the purpose of watering and deadheading while Jo and Bob are out of town.  (I can only say this because I am writing it three weeks later!)

Jo's colours still going strong

Jo’s colours still going strong

Jo is missing some of her lilies and I hope they will still be blooming when she and Bob return.  (They were, I am happy to say!)

lily with green throat

downfacing lily

upfacing

upfacing

tall and deep red

tall and deep red

with Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

with Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

daisies topped with Lavatera 'Barnsley'

daisies topped with Lavatera ‘Barnsley’

We then return to Ilwaco to spend a long session weeding in Ann’s garden

Ann's fenced veg garden

Ann’s fenced veg garden

It doesn’t look like much, but I planted a small river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (just three) down a slope on the west side of the garden.

Rozanne with potential

Rozanne with potential

It will look good sprawling and climbing near Ann’s stunning blue hydrangea.

Ann's hydrangea

July 31

We begin at the Depot where a passerby has a wonderful Saint Bernard.  This, of course, causes me to strike up a conversation in order to pet the dog.

dog

It turns out the dog’s person is on the board (President, I think) of the Water Music Festival, so he knows who I am (in that I do the Facebook page for the Music in the Gardens tour) but due to face blindness I did not recognize him.  Have also forgotten the name of the wonderful sweet dog, but have not forgotten that the website of the man’s guest cottage has a photo of the dog as a pup.  Years ago, when the larger cottage and the guest cottage belonged to Bev Rolfe, Robert and I put in a garden there.

an excellent dog

an excellent dog

He is a dry mouth St Bernard; I did not even know there was such a thing.  My cousin raised St Bernards and I remember the massive drool along with the sweet personalities.  (We were handed towels upon entering the house.)

a cute little chickadee

a cute little chickadee

Alert reader Kathleen Shaw informs me that this is not a chickadee but instead a sparrow.  She thinks it is a white crowned sparrow.

and I almost forgot, what with the dog and all: the garden

and I almost forgot, what with the dog and all: the garden

Next, we make a stop at The Planter Box to take some photos for a pre-tour sneak peeks album for the Edible Gardens page, another project of mine.  Ray Millner has a glorious veg garden just north of the garden center.

At Ray's garden, the chickens came running out to greet us.

At Ray’s garden, the chickens came running out to greet us.

veg of great beauty

veg of great beauty

veg

strawberries by the pond

strawberries by the pond

by the pond (a small lake)

by the pond (a small lake)

chickens by the water

chickens by the water

Then on up the Peninsula to Marilyn’s, which will also be on the Aug 7th little garden club tour, so I want to make sure it is deadheaded.

Marilyn's

Marilyn’s looking south

and looking north

and looking north

Heading back down to Ocean Park, we check on the Wiegardt Gallery garden….

Lavender and Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Lavender and Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

hoping the deer don't eat the lilies

hoping the deer don’t eat the lilies

broken stemmed Alliums tucked into the Cistus

broken stemmed Alliums tucked into the Cistus

north side (Eric's studio) with elephant garlic

north side (Eric’s studio) with elephant garlic

Next: Oman Builders Supply where the garden is showing some stress from not getting enough water.  Our job here is not to water, and it is complicated because one needs a long hose and a key (which we have) to turn on the faucet, and time to stand around and water if the soakers are not doing a good enough job (they are not!)

OBS

OBS, looking south

Next, we spend the usual time thoroughly weeding and deadheading at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I am pleased that a dahlia which did not do much last year is spectacular now.  We planted it in a pot because the garden has a snail problem.

dahlia at KBC

dahlia at KBC

KBC is another Facebook page that I do, and I am way behind on uploading garden photos there, which I used to do on a weekly basis…till this year when I started blogging here daily.

The KBC sweet peas are doing better than at any of our other gardens.

sweet peas

sweet peas

more

As with all the gardens, the lilies are fabulous this week.

lilies

lily

lilies

lily

lily

lily

lily

I feel there is no such thing as lily overload, although I do wish they did not all go through an awkward stage after blooming while we wait for the stem to die back (and clip a little off every week).

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

garden overview

garden overview

You can see Allan on the left, above, pruning the New Dawn rose over the south gate.  While I swan about taking lily photos.  Really, I do work.

Next, we go to Golden Sands Assisted Living.  This time, my expectactions that the watering problems will be fixed are very low.  I know it is too soon, but I hope the wheels of progress have begun to turn.  So we hand water (with our long hose) the whole courtyard.  We have to drag our own hose in because theirs are firmly fixed to the ineffective twirly sprinklers.

The white hydrangeas would get no water at all except for our hose watering.

The white hydrangeas would get no water at all except for our hose watering.

SW quadrant

SW quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

It’s gone rather dull now that the blue scabiosa has gone over.  It would look so much better if we had time to groom and weed rather than standing around hose watering.

At present there is no time to weed this area, which only gets water from us.

At present there is no time to weed this area, which only gets water from us.

Daylilies are a plant that gets overused in a situation like this because it is so easy to get them for free.  Here they sit, not doing much at all.

The NE quadrant outside my mom's old room is still the best...

The NE quadrant outside my mom’s old room is still the best…

Whoever is living in my mom’s old room can’t see out the window because of overgrown shrubs.  It is not our job to fix that, but I would if I had the time.

NW quadrant

NW quadrant

The NW quadrant is still pitiful due to lack of mulch.  (Need I even add…no time…)

If the sprinkler system gets fixed, the corners will get water!

If the sprinkler system gets fixed, the corners will get water!

Next, we go for our weekly session at Andersen’s RV Park.  A man who introduces himself as Bob the Basket Maker (I think) has set himself up there for a few weeks making wonderful baskets.

Basket maker

Basket maker

His baskets are selling well.

His baskets are selling well.

artist at work

artist at work

Walking back, I see a view of the garden that I usually do not see from that far to the west.  The camera does not show it the way my eyes see it, but a severely squashed by telephoto shot sort of does…

The whiskey barrels are not that close together.

The whiskey barrels are not that close together; again, Allan works while I….ooops.

Deadheading Payson Hall is time consuming at this time of year.

Deadheading Payson Hall is time consuming at this time of year.

The picket fence garden

The picket fence garden

Down at the garden shed border, the Alchemilla (lady’s mantle) so very much needs deadheading, but we are about to run out of daylight so we just do not have time.

why I don't especially like lady's mantle....

why I don’t especially like lady’s mantle….

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July 10:  It is easier to go to work while the cats snooze than it was during wild late winter weather.  They seem to pick such uncomfortable places…

Mary and Smokey

Mary and Smokey

We began with a check up on Diane’s Sandridge garden.  I am happy with the way the roadside bed is filling in (thanks in part of Larry’s good watering).

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

Next door, the garden by the Red Barn is looking better…

Red Barn garden

Red Barn garden

And in the barn, I could not resist going to look at a burro (or donkey?)

donkey

And a horse, maybe named Peace or maybe that is the sentiment of the horse’s person.

peace

peace

From there, we stopped at The Basket Case so I could get myself one of those Banana Cream daisies, and I also picked up some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ to add to the Long Beach planters.  I will probably hold them till better planting weather in fall.

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Echinacea looking fabulous

Echinacea looking fabulous

Then on to Peninsula Landscape Supply to dump debris and get half a yard of Soil Energy to add to Marilyn’s.  We arrived at an exciting time when a big delivery of stone arrived.

much activity

much activity

Garden tour poster in the window

Garden tour poster in the window

Peninsula Landscape Supply will be one of the ticket sales points for the July 20th tour.

In the midst of all the action, Colleen loaded us up…

Colleen

and off we went to Marilyn’s.  The garden is looking pretty tour worthy!

tour ready

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

I took lots of photos so that I could get the deer page ready by Friday when tickets (with the link) were to go on sale.  We had the strimmer and used it along the backside of the garden so it now looks good from all angles.

behind the garden

behind the garden

The two Rozannes ended up at Marilyn’s along the driveway after we had added the mulch to that area and to another path spot behind the back porch…and then we were off back south to the Wiegardt Gallery in Ocean Park.

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Gallery manager Christl expressed amazement that the Eryngium just keeps getting more intensely blue.

Eric Wiegardt himself showed up with a new painting, and lots of cars arrived for a workshop he was about to teach.

The Artist

The Artist

We left for Klipsan Beach Cottages to do weeding and deadheading.  Two slightly different views than the usual:

the garden view people get when they check in

the garden view people get when they check in

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

I am not just weeding out weeds but trying to get rid of damnable Japanese anemone, a plant I once liked till I found how invasively it runs through a garden.

The sweet peas at KBC are doing better than mine.  So are the ones at Andersen’s…I think because they got more care than mine at home!

sweet peas and Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

sweet peas and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

sweet pea and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

sweet pea and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

We then went to Golden Sands Assisted Living, where I took the usual pictures of the four quadrants.  We had to water around the edges again but this time I had a great talk with the maintenance man who is going to address the powers that be about getting some better sprinklers set up.  The ones they have a pretty twirly things that get baffled by plants growing in to them and that do not reach the edges of the gardens.  We discussed how I could get the courtyard looking good enough to be on the garden tour if the water situation got resolved and if we had some help cleaning up the pitifully weedy and drab areas outside the quadrants, where I actually think bark mulch (NOT RED) would help.

outside the quadrant

outside the quadrants

southwest  quadrant

southwest quadrant

detail: Sanguisorba

detail: Sanguisorba

NW quadrant...still needs mulch!

NW quadrant…still needs mulch!

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant detail

SE quadrant detail

By the time we were almost ready to leave, some of the residents were taking an after dinner walk through the courtyard and we were most pleased to hear their happy words about the flowers.

Not done yet, we spent an hour or so at Andersen’s RV Park.  The main show of poppies in the west garden is declining but some of the newly planted areas are coming on with poppies sown this year rather than reseeded ones.

west garden at Andersen's

west garden at Andersen’s: middle section is petering out

but the south side has new poppies

but the south side has new poppies

and so does the west end.

and so does the west end.

Here’s a different view than the usual one of the picket fence garden on the east side of Lorna’s house.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence.  This is looking north.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence. This is looking north.

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!  What a face!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

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I had every intention of helping to pack antiques for the move of Olde Towne coffee shop to its new location at 108 First Ave (just two blocks further from our house).

Olde Towne on the move

Olde Towne on the move

But the weather was simply too good to not work in my garden.  Fortunately, Allan was gung ho about helping wrap antiques, and he stayed all afternoon.  Since I had only offered originally to help for one hour, I think it all worked out.

Allan wrapping glass

Allan wrapping glass

On the way home, I planted sweet peas at the post office garden and I hope they do better than last year…when they were a complete bust in that location.

Then I admired a few things in our garden.  This is the first recent day that has felt at all springlike and warmish.

Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII'

Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’

Ribes sanguineum 'Apple Blossom'

Ribes sanguineum ‘Apple Blossom’

Rhubarb leafing out

Rhubarb leafing out; one of the few plants that was here when we bought the place (in a whisky barrel).

lily buds

lily buds

I pondered for awhile about why my Rosa pteracantha has no sign of life, not even at the base.  I looked hard to acquire it, finally finding one on a trip to Cistus nursery, and it has done fine til now.  I hope it is just much later to start than other roses, because it is not one that I can replace here.

Rosa pteracantha

Rosa pteracantha

The thorns are so large and close together than I am not about to scratch the stem and see if there is green life underneath.  On new growth, they would be bright red and glow when backlit by sun, and I am not seeing anything on this rose that looks lively.

Rose pteracantha thorns

Rose pteracantha thorns

on my latest plant table

on my latest plant table

Enough wandering about admiring; I had tasks to do, notably, pulling out the reseeded wild impatiens from the front garden.  All OVER the front garden.  No wonder it is a class B noxious weed.  It amuses people greatly when the seed pods burst, but I was not much amused today.  It was in my old garden when I bought the place in ’94 and migrated with me to my new garden to sprout up again the next spring.  It is a beautiful and fun plant and I got soft on it and let a few grow near the house.  Now I am doing penance.  (It never jumped out of my old garden, but in the shadier conditions there it also did not reseed this madly.   I have seen it in gardens all over the Peninsula, and used to see it when I walked through Carkeek Park in Seattle.)

thick patch of seedlings

thick patch of seedlings

I am not the only one regrettably enamored with this plant;  Dave’s garden has a forum where it is much admired.   I ran across a British article in defense of some so called invasives which particularly defended this one, pointing out that it is easy to remove.  Which it is, given time.  Its juicy sap is well known to be soothing for poison ivy and other itches.

I need befores and afters to compare my progress.  One thing about pulling this rascal:  It needs to be done only once a year.  It won’t come back this year like horsetail, bindweed, creeping buttercup, my triumvirate of most hated weeds.

front garden with lots of baby jewelweed

front garden with lots of baby jewelweed

an hour later

an hour later

I’ve almost got a handle on it in this front garden bed as well, where I just tossed it to the back as green compost.

front bed, mostly weeded

front bed, mostly weeded

In the area of my first photo of it, I only got a spot dug out for the sweet pea planting.

One more weeding session needed here...

One more weeding session needed here…

I had plenty of company in the garden.   Calvin is getting more confident outside.

Calvin

Calvin

a sleek, handsome boy

a sleek, handsome boy

Frosty, Mary, Smokey

Frosty, Mary, Smokey

During the “after” photo session, I also focused on some plant beauties in Allan’s garden:

Pulmonaria

Pulmonaria

Allan brought home three heathers from Seattle, all the same cultivar, which I must admit has pretty foliage:  Calluna vulgaris ‘Wickwar Flame’, lower right.

another pulmonaria

Below, two more areas in the front garden where I must rogue out a lot of jewelweed:

by this charming vignette

by this charming vignette

and atop the low brick wall

and atop the low brick wall

and right around here

and right around here

Meanwhile, before the pre-sunset hour got too chilly, I got all the remaining sweet pea seeds planted around the fences areas where I grew them last year.  This sounds like a big long day but it was in truth just four hours starting in mid afternoon because I frittered away the first part of the day with the struggle to sleep after an insomniac night.

The sweet peas that I planted this year at various gardens:

Watermelon, Royal Wedding, Streamers, Incense Peach Shades, Saltwater Taffy Swirls, Mary Lou Heard, Zinfandel, Lipstick, Regal Robe, Captain of the Blues, Miss Willmott, Cupani, Lord Nelson, King Edward VII, North Shore, Blue Celeste, Velvet Elegance, Scented Pastel Mix (including Jilly, Chatsworth, Sylvia More).

I would still love to acquire some ‘Alan Titchmarsh” sweet peas in honour of Ground Force.  If I got organized enough to search in mid winter, I could probably find a US source for them.  Next year, I hope I will.  A quick search now tells me it will might not be easy.  It seems I might have to buy them on E Bay UK unless Thompson and Morgan seeds sells them in their US catalog.

I am not at all one to make a so called “bucket list” but if I did, to grow Alan Titchmarsh sweet peas would be high on the list.

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The health difficulties of early 2002 are reflected in the paucity of photos from our jobs during the first part of the year.  I plugged along on our regular jobs, and had to cancel taking on the gardens at Blackwood Cottages because on my own for the first part of the year, I could barely keep up with what we already had.

Andersen’s RV Park

Narcissi in the new west side garden

Narcissi in the new west side garden

For a few years, I was able to grow tulips in the Andersen’s gardens, and then first the voles and then the deer discovered them.

Tulips in the new garden.

Tulips in the new garden.

Anchorage Cottages

Anchorage office garden with Ceanothus in bloom.  It is three times that size now!

Anchorage office garden with Ceanothus in bloom. It is three times that size now!

The Shelburne Inn

front garden with tulips and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

front garden with tulips and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

back garden of herbs with bright tulip display

back garden of herbs with bright tulip display

China Beach Retreat

naturalized narcissi

naturalized narcissi

bulbs and cerinthe in the deck planter

bulbs and cerinthe in the deck planter

Summerhouse

tulips of May

tulips of May

Klipsan Beach Cottages

I was there every week during the peak gardening season, but I cannot find a photo that is definitely from 2002.

The Sandcastle

I swiped this photo of Don Woodcock’s Sandcastle house from Funbeach.com because all I have are photos of the garden and not the stunning house.

The Sandcastle

The Sandcastle

Since Don died, it has fallen into disrepair as you can tell by the state of the roof…He always kept it up perfectly.

Along the west fence in 2002, we had a garden of roses and sweetpeas.  Don, in his 70s then, and I would sit on the front porch steps and talk about life.

Sandcastle sweet peas

Sandcastle sweet peas

sc2

sc3

sc4

sc5

Seaview Solstice

Across the street to the west, we had begun to maintain the Seaview Solstice vacation rental house.  Well, more like come in a few times a year to work on the garden.  It was a surprisingly difficult one, being on heavy clay (as was the Sandcastle.  Surprisingly, a vein of clay runs along L Place gardens in Seaview.)

Seaview Solstice (from their website)

Seaview Solstice (from their website)

pink tulips to match the pink Solstice house

pink tulips to match the pink Solstice house

Next:  The City of Long Beach gardens in 2002

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into the autumn….still with no rain…at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

4 October

Agapanthus seedheads

Agapanthus seedheads

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' and Sanvitalia

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Sanvitalia

climbing roses

climbing roses

roses

roses

rose and Melianthus major

rose and Melianthus major

Knock Out rose

Knock Out rose

Knock Out roses

Knock Out roses

sweet peas

sweet peas

white sweet peas

white sweet peas

Hydrangea 'Izu no Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu no Hana’

a Clematis from Joy Creek Nursery

a Clematis from Joy Creek Nursery

Dierama (Angel's Fishing Rod) seedheads

Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod) seedheads

driveway garden

driveway garden

Mary’s idea for 2013 is to make the shape of the driveway garden by the house more curvaceous.

10 October

office

office

At last I have some photos that show how it all fits together.  You drive in and park below the office…where you would have the view below:

from the driveway parking:  view across lawn to the fenced garden (looking northwest)

from the driveway parking: view across lawn to the fenced garden (looking northwest)

Fuschia containers by the driveway

Fuschia containers by the driveway

golden yews at center of fenced garden

golden yews at center of fenced garden
second area of fenced garden.  To the left, Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

second area of fenced garden. To the left, Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana' flower

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’ flower

lower fenced garden with Knock Out roses and view of cottages

lower fenced garden with Knock Out roses and view of cottages

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas and cottages

sweet peas and cottages

figs

figs

Bronze fennel (now officially considered something of a noxious weed)

Bronze fennel (now officially considered something of a noxious weed)

In the foreground, above, Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ and Euphobia characias wulfenii, which bloomed mightily and at length in the early spring.

Salvia patens and Helichrysum 'Limelight' in center of fenced garden

Salvia patens and Helichrysum ‘Limelight’ in center of fenced garden

Salvia africana-lutea in a container

Salvia africana-lutea in a container

The above very cool brown Salvia has leaves that smell, to me, a bit of root beer.  I have brought it through winter in a cold greenhouse before.

In the background above, the fabulously tall Thalictrum ‘Elin’ from Dan Hinkley’s Heronswood.

Rose, Coreopsis 'Flower Tower', Melianthus major

Rose, Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’, Melianthus major

I got Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ from Joy Creek Nursery a couple of years ago, and in summer 2012 was able to get more at The Basket Case Greenhouse locally.  It is a fun plant because the usual small yellow coreopsis flowers bloom on a towering stem that can get taller than me.

25 October

flowering currant

flowering currant

From the bench above, looking south, we have this view of the garden:

looking south

looking south

On the very right in the background, above, you can see the tallness of Thalictrum ‘Elin’.

The showy autumn stems of the very tall Thalictrum 'Elin'

The showy autumn stems of the very tall Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Japanese maple at the A Frame

Japanese maple in the A Frame garden

mophead hydrangeas in the A Frame garden

mophead hydrangeas in the A Frame garden

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Continuing the review of the 2012 gardens at Klipsan Beach Cottages

5 September

rose

rose

Rose 'Jude the Obscure' with honeysuckle

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’ with honeysuckle

Melianthus major

Melianthus major (leaves smell like peanut butter)

mixed bed with ocean view cottages in background

mixed bed with ocean view cottages in background

boxwood and garden art

boxwood and garden art

Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle)

Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle) and Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' behind the bench

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ behind the bench

sweet peas on the deer fence

sweet peas on the deer fence

deer fence gate closed at end of day

deer fence gate closed at end of day

13 September

September 13th was a very hot day.

September 13th was a very hot day.

Cosmos 'Double Click'

Cosmos ‘Double Click’

rose bud

rose bud

the cobalt blue berries of Billardia longiflora

the cobalt blue berries of Billardia longiflora

20 September

garden bed with view of cabins

garden bed with view of cabins

The summer drought continued throughout September.  I think we had two months with no appreciable rain.

Petunia 'Pretty Much Picasso' in center of fenced garden

Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ in center of fenced garden

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

26 September

sweet peas and endlessly blue sky

sweet peas and endlessly blue sky

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

gold on gold in center of fenced garden:  Helichrysum 'Limelight', golden yew, Miscanthus 'Gold Bar'

gold on gold in center of fenced garden: Helichrysum ‘Limelight’, golden yew, Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

autumn crocus

autumn crocus from my mother’s garden

a refreshing spot of green

a refreshing spot of green

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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