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Sunday, 24 September 2017

in which Allan sails on the Hawaiian Chieftain

The Tall Ships have been visiting Ilwaco for years, however, this is the first time I’ve actually gone out on one of their sails. I was encouraged to actually do the deed when we met the ships’ crews Friday night at a potluck dinner held for our Ilwaco volunteer firefighters (blogged here). Sunday looked to be the windiest day available and the ‘Battle Sail’ looked to be the best example of competitive sailing.

The ticket sales are done remotely from their shore office. The homesite with their schedule and pricing is at the Grays Harbor Historical Seaport site.

Below is the first photo in my digital library.  It was taken from one of our old gardening jobs to show how we often get a fine view while working.

The Lady Washington entering the Ilwaco Harbour June 2006

When I arrived at the docks on Sunday the visiting ships’ masts and spars towered over the other boats.

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I first took a tour of the Lady Washington.

Detail of the graceful iron bracing and rigging of her bow.

Eighty-nine feet of mast

A tidy mess of lines.

A detail of one of the blocks

A form of tea I had not seen before was offered below deck.

I researched this tea, and it apparently stores better this way and was often used for trading.  A small brick would have been interesting to try out but I already have a reputation of somewhat iffy experiments in the kitchen so I played it safe and bought a gift t-shirt instead.   I found out later that to prepare a tea brick, you usually first toast it for flavor and sanitation.  It is then ground to a powder before adding it to hot water. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_brick

The Tall Ships offered four programs while in Ilwaco. The first is a tour of either craft while docked with a suggested five dollar donation. Second is the ‘Adventure Tour’ of two hours “…to experience tall ship handling, sea shanty singing, and maritime amusement.”   Today I had signed up for the ‘Battle Sail’, which lasts three hours and  ” …features booming cannons, close-quarters maneuvers, and a taste of 18th century maritime life aboard tall ships. You will experience both of our tall ships in action as they attempt to win the mock battle of the day!”  I’m sure it would have featured many examples of quick reactions with the sails as they maneuvered. However, I got a call early in the day offering an adjustment or the right to cancel as, sadly, the gunpowder had not been delivered. Instead, they substituted an ‘Adventure Tour’  that turned out to be a very fine trip, too.

The fourth option, by the way, was a one-way trip to California.

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The Hawaiian Chieftain docked.

Here we are cueing up a half hour before and resolving any issues first.

We were asked to wait on the main deck opposite the dock for orientation. Much good advice was handed out: Stay alert, don’t mess with the lines. Beware where you set your stuff down as many a travel bag and expensive camera have fallen out the scuppers. We stayed in place and, as requested, stayed quiet while the crew left the dock and motored out into the bay.

Ready to work with her climbing harness.

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It looked calm in the port but the crew expected wind once we were clear of the hills.

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“Coyote (the fishing boat) one hundred feet ahead starboard” as the various hazards are called back to the captain as we safely leave the crowded port.

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A lot of pilings yet to clear. Sand Island is in the distance.

Our captain and a detail of the crews’ shirt.

Soon, members of the crew were sent aloft to prepare sails.

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First, the two  upper square sails were prepared

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After the sails were ready to deploy, each crew member made a short reverse angled climb to get off the crows nest. It was not a rope ladder down, not a rope ladder out. When swinging off the platform, one swings their feets under the platform and climbs under it.

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Finally back to the deck

The two sails were set and had the ability to pivot left or right. The fuzzy mitts on the lines reduce chaffing on the fore and aft sails.

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The engine was put in neutral and we are under sail.

A forward jib sail was set along with a similar rear mizzen sail.

A captain in training is at the wheel while we enjoy the bay.

I was impressed by the grace and playfulness of the crew that comes from their competence and enjoyment of the task at hand.

The jib being pulled to the other side after changing course.

Looking back on the ‘MapMyTracks’ app I had running on my phone, we were sailing around five mph. It was more exciting than the ferry trips on the Puget Sound that I used to enjoy.

Securing the square sails to belaying pins

Showing another crew member how to tie a stopper knot. If the line slips through the pulleys, it’s often a long tight climb to reinstall it.

Anyone losing a line through the pulleys has to buy the crew a beer, or maybe a soda.

It was joyfully announced that they had one cannon charge left over from yesterday’s ‘Battle Sail’. A random boat was signaled to pull up alongside so it could be blasted.

Stop!

The main deck is cleared of everyone except the Bosun.

He rams acharge into the cannon’s muzzle.

A signal to the other captain to move into range.

We all repeated on command “Fire in the hole!” Ears are covered, the little boat’s doom was sealed.

Hiding behind a sign didn’t save them.

A crew member mentioned that boats often pull up alongside asking to be blasted by the cannon.

Soon it was time to strike the sails.

Not much to stand on as the sail is secured

I saw a guest come up from below where she told me we could see the little store and the rear cabin.

The crew high above as I went below.

Here’s a small sample of their library as I tried to photograph all their books to study later.

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The last scarf went home with me. This design is called a ‘square topsail ketch’ and also features a triple keel to allow it to sail in shallower water than the more traditional single keel.

A 20 page PDF of their ‘Volunteer Sail Training Handbook’ is available on this page among their application and scholarship forms. It is a good read to know what a potential crew member should expect and the history of these ships.

With the sails down, we entered the main channel back to port.

Cape Disappointment with the lighthouse off to the left.

The little boats joined us in the channel

The Port of Ilwaco off the port bow.

Among the thanks that were being given to the crew as we disembarked, I heard a crew member reply, “Thank YOU for giving us the opportunity to play on our jungle gym.”

A donation to fund the volunteer crew to help cover laundry, a meal ashore or even an emergency trip to see their families.

From my phone, this was our route which just crossed the border into Oregon.

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Over two hours of the sailing and history like it used to be, amazing.

 

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Yesterday, in a photo caption, I mis-identified the Ilwaco Fire Dept as Long Beach. No idea why!  Fortunately, astute blog reader Our Kathleen caught the error.  

Saturday, 23 September 2017

I thought I should go to the Saturday Market for a few photos for Discover Ilwaco, since the market has only two more weekends to go and might get rained out on the last one.  I had not been to the market much this summer because of my sore heel.  Now that it is feeling better, I can walk without constant pain.

I decided to not disturb my neighbor Rudder with pets.

Approaching the market, I noted that the tall ships were tall.

De Asis produce

two tall ships

Allan had signed on for tomorrow’s “battle sail” on one of these ships.

Mandolin Pete with a guitar instead outside Don Nisbett’s gallery

busy market day

a market patron

two little cuties

I was eager to get home to my garden, but when I did, I found that going to the market had sapped my energy, so I accomplished little.  Allan worked on painting his shed.

before (Allan’s photo)

Allan painting his shed.

I accomplished one thing, with Allan’s help a bit: digging out the snail chewed hostas.  I am giving up on them.  Almost.  I chopped off a little piece of each to try to grow in a drier spot.

can’t look at this anymore

I was then inspired to sift some compost, so the day was not wasted.

In the late afternoon, rounding the corner to dump some sifted compost along Willows Loop West, I was stopped by a beacon of light.

It was the glowing of Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’, an ironically late blooming kniphofia that Todd gave me.  It is spectacular.

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ illuminated by late afternoon sun

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’

lovely compost, not sifted ultra fine because it is going on a perennial bed.

I finally decided this horrible heather had to go. OUT.

Allan’s end of day photo

Sunday, 24 Sept 2017

Ed Strange stopped by to pick up the hostas.  His hosta patch is glorious and mine will be happier there.

Ed’s Jackson

Goodbye Sum and Substance and the other one

Allan departed to walk to the port, first to tour a Tall Ship and then to go on a sail.  It would, however, not be a battle sail; he had gotten a call this morning that their gunpowder had not been delivered, so the event was now an hour shorter Adventure Sail.  That will be tomorrow’s post.

I had company at noon ish: Dear friend Judy S., her spouse Larry and sister Rosalie.  We had a gratifying tour of the garden (because they like it) and a good talk in the shady campfire area.

Rosalie, Larry, Judy

I dug this hardy fuchsia out of the (now compost mulched) former hosta bed and gave it to Judy.

Skooter

I had a surge of energy and got ALL my ladies in waiting planted.  It helps a lot that my foot is hurting much less.

Asclepias fascicularis

Asclepias speciosa

Eryngium proteiflorum (went in by the garden boat)

The strawberries are trying to take over my would-be scree garden.

Eryngium padanifolium

Chocolate Shogun is near the base of the lady.

Astilbe ‘Chocolate Shogun’

My Metapanax delavayi from Xera also went into the former hosta bed.

Metapanax delavayi berries

Metapanax delavayi berries—thrilling!

I sifted more compost.  Frosty stayed close by.

I got the third bin sifted and emptied and put new newspaper down at the base (as a weed barrier).

Now I have two full bins of old debris, and will start layering the brown with new green material in the empty bin.

I took the last sifted wheelbarrow load of compost to a weedy path on the east side of the fire circle and proceeded to weed in preparation for mulching.

weeded and ready, but….

I remembered that I had thought this might be a cool spot to have a pond, probably one made out of a big, and I mean REALLY big, tub. because tree roots would prevent digging.  A tub like the ones I saw in this garden in Portland.

I stared at the garden bed for at least ten minutes, just trying to decide.  Big tub pond here? With a bench around it maybe? But where to get a big tub like that? And it is far from electricity (if one wanted a burbler in it).

to tub or not to tub

A big tub with a curved bench in front, where people could sit some distance from the campfire, would be amazing.

I finally dumped the load of compost onto the old hosta bed because I did not want to waste it on a bed that might get transformed.

old hosta bed with ALL the mulch

Allan returned, well satisfied with his Tall Ships sailing experience.  As a reward for much garden and painting progress, and because the evening was almost windless, we had a campfire dinner.

It has been an enormous relief to get my home gardening energy back.  One large factor has been that my foot is hurting much less than during midsummer, when it made it impossible to do much on days off but sit and kvetch and read.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 3 June 2016

Mike’s Garden

We needed to do a check up on Mike’s garden, a few blocks to the east.  It had held up well.  I sicced Allan on the woodsy back yard while I pulled some weeds out of the front path.

Might I just say that I deeply value having a mayor who lives in an abode as humble as a “double wide” rather than a big fancy house.

Mayor Mike's place

Mayor Mike’s place

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Maybe next time I will trim the boxwoods a tiny bit...maybe....

Maybe next time I will trim the boxwoods a tiny bit…maybe….

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Allan's photo: back garden

Allan’s photo: back garden before

after

after

before

before

after; the garden drops off into a deep swale that we do not weed.

after; the garden drops off into a deep swale that we do not weed.

Of course, if it were my property, I’d have that deep swale all landscaped into some sort of wetland paradise.

the small woodsy bit of back garden

the small woodsy bit of back garden

Ilwaco

our volunteer garden at the post office

our volunteer garden at the post office

tiered garden at the Ilwaco Community Building

tiered garden at the Ilwaco Community Building

I’d been having an intense feeling of doom that something else bad (like the lost garden and other recent difficulties) was going to happen in my gardening world.  Instead, on the way to work, I got an email that caused much rejoicing:  One of the port curbside garden beds which was not being watered for the past year, and which we could not water ourselves, is being watered again, and therefore we are bringing it back into our roster of garden care.  I had not weeded it for a long time because I could not bear to work among distressed plants.  I immediately re-ordered my plan for the day in order to get it weeded for the weekend as the Tall Ships will be in port and I’d love to have it looking good for that.

Basket Case Greenhouse

We ran the cheque from Long Beach City Hall over to the Basket Case, because we are helpful that way, and of course I succumbed to buying a couple of plants for my garden…again.  Just three begonias for me and three plants for the garden that is back in the fold.

Basket Case Greenhouse

Basket Case Greenhouse

Walter (Allan's photo)

Walter (Allan’s photo)

Basket Case with fancy lavenders

Basket Case with fancy lavenders

Shopping is irresistible.

Shopping is irresistible.

Long Beach

Because I had a bit of time anxiety now instead of the long unworried day I’d had planned, I put off till next week some mulching in Fifth Street Park. We did tackle one project on our list: shearing back the beach approach roses.  “I’ll just do the first little bit!” I promised, and then got involved and did the whole first section (the only section where the roses are growing out into the street).

Allan's photo

“I’ll just clip the first little bit!”  (Allan’s photo; he was concerned we would run out of time.)

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outrunning the traffic cone

outrunning the traffic cone

 Allan included the street trees in the watering rounds, a task I find daunting because it is hard to get the hose down into the faucet slot in the ground.

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' under a street tree (Allan's photo)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ under a street tree (Allan’s photo)

hot rodding through town (Allan's photo)

hot rodding through town (Allan’s photo)

Fifth Street Park, Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' (not blue yet) (Allan's photo)

Fifth Street Park, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (not blue yet) (Allan’s photo)

Both of us independently admired the new water feature at the Nu2U vintage store; I haven’t been in there yet, partly because the whole “man cave” idea does not draw me in.  This water feature is such a delight that when I have time, I will check out the store for sure.

from across the street

from across the street

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We did some bucket watering of new plants in the Bolstad beach approach planters and I am thrilled to report none have been stolen.  I got to pet a puppy, just a couple of months!  I informed his humans that there is a toll for friendly puppies who walk by the gardeners.

Allan's photo, a little brown Boston Terrier.

Allan’s photo, a little brown Boston Terrier.

This little dog enjoys a daily outing with his human's slow driving truck.

This little dog enjoys a daily outing with his human’s slow driving truck.

With the last of our water we spot watered some plants on the Sid Snyder approach.  We did not have time to hook up our little hoses for a proper watering there.

Allan dumps the last of our water reserves on a thirsty plant.

Allan dumps the last of our water reserves on a thirsty plant.

Our last Long Beach task, to give the welcome sign’s edging plants some supplemental water, revealed a mystery.

a plank and ladder thingie at one end

a plank and ladder thingie at one end

the back of the garden trampled with many feet, but no plants damaged.

the back of the garden trampled with many feet, but no plants damaged.

Allan thought some people might have stood in the garden for a photo.  I think the footprints are facing the wall so it was more likely the city crew working on the sign.

Ilwaco

We refilled our buckets at the boatyard so that I’d have water to put down in the planting holes for the five new plants I had for the port.  I then set out to weed the long neglected curbside bed while Allan got the water trailer and watered the Ilwaco planters and street trees.

an Ilwaco planter (Allan's photo)

an Ilwaco planter (Allan’s photo)

Allan says Our Jenna has been watering the planter by her Queen La De Da's shop.

Allan says Our Jenna has been watering the planter by her Queen La De Da’s shop and one across the street.

I was SO happy at my weeding job, with a deep joy at this garden being watered again, and gave a welcome home to some new plants (penstemons and eryngiums and one lovely dianthus).  The wind had kicked up to a shocking degree that almost knocked me off balance, the river rock is so hard to walk on that my knee burned by the end of the job, and yet it was so darned satisfying.

before

before, part of the garden bed

Allan arrived to find me still weeding.

Allan arrived to find me still weeding.

two hours later; Allan arrived to help at the very end.

two hours later; Allan arrived to help at the very end.  It was shockingly windy.

I think I will try a run of rudbeckia down the middle and see how it does here now that watering is guaranteed.

While I worked, the Hawaiian Chieftain and the Lady Washington had sailed into port and docked.  I had my nose to the ground and did not see them till the end of weeding.

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Hawaiian Chieftain

Hawaiian Chieftain

We watered at the Time Enough Books garden, the one with the choicest plants.

looking west

looking west

curbside north of the port office

curbside north of the port office

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

am thrilled no one has picked the foxtail lilies

am thrilled no one has picked the foxtail lilies

We had worked till sunset, a ten hour day.

looking northwest from Time Enough Books

looking northwest from Time Enough Books

sunset (Allan's photo)

sunset (Allan’s photo)

I arrived home to find that Dave and Melissa had dropped off some plants from their excursion to a nursery inland.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I was DONE with planting. What have I done??

What have I done??  More planting!!

By the time I got all the plants moved and watered, I had worked an eleven hour day and it was dark.  Dinner was at 11 PM, a baked pizza from the freezer.  I put my knee on ice and we settled in for an episode of Luther.  Thank goodness for three days off to get the plants into the ground and get some extra sleep.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

June 3:  Another rainy day so I puttered with house plants.  Then I potted the 3rd planting of Ed Hume’s tomato seedlings.  41 Early Girl and 43 Pik Red.  I put them under lights in shop.  I used the 10″ paper cups that Don gave me.

1998 (age 74):

June 3:  2:00-5:00  I was late getting outside and couldn’t decide what to do first.  However, I started checking begonia basket hangers.  I repotted a few bulbs into other baskets.  I actually was able to hang the baskets. When I get the pot wire I ordered from Charlie’s I should be able to hang all the baskets.

 

 

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I am determined to catch up, having fallen behind on the caterpillar emergency non-blogging day, and skipping a day has been exacerbated by the long hours of daylight.  You see, if I suddenly pop my clogs, Allan would know how to keep the business going just by reading the blog for 2013 and replicating the work!  It is the same every year, pretty much!

He would find three jobs had been quit this year, but there is plenty to fill in on the other jobs (thus the quitting).

So:  Friday and Saturday in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

Friday, we began with some deadheading at Larry and Robert’s garden half a block away.  No watering necessary due to blissful rain!

their garden boat

their garden boat

My dear friends Judy and Tom’s new car shows up pretty and red in this photo.

The empty new planters had been put in place in downtown Ilwaco (more on this later) but not in the best spots (more on THAT later) so Allan shifted two of them.  While we were parked for that task, our good friend and brilliant carpenter Bill Clearman stopped for a by-the-car visit.  Allan provided a bucket for a seat.

catching up with Bill

catching up with Bill

Bill is an inspiration to us, still working hard at 70 plus.

Bill's reaction on learning he was being photographed for The Blog

Bill’s reaction on learning he was being photographed for The Blog

We checked on The Depot Restaurant garden next.

at the Depot

at the Depot

Next we drove up to The Basket Case to get soil for the Ilwaco planters.  Because Basket Case closes for the season in mid July (having originally been mostly annuals and hanging baskets), we are glad to have the chance to help them sell more of their soil now.

Basket Case

I wish I had bought myself one of their yellow Shasta daisies!  I just was not quick enough with the realization that I want one.  Or two.

yellow daisies

“Banana Cream’ yellow daisies

Next:  Long Beach.  I will regale you with some photos of the planters downtown;  I walked around weeding and deadheading all of them while Allan went out to Bolstadt to weed the beach approach….a job we had planned to spend two days on but wind and rain intervened.  At least I did not have to water the planters!

northernmost planter, east side of street

northernmost planter, east side of street

Diascia and Sunbini

Diascia and Sunbini

Geranium 'Rozanne' and golden marjoram

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden marjoram

My goal:  to have two Rozanne in each planter.  I formulated this goal too late to add them this year, as I think good, damp planting season is over (and the planters are full of annuals).  Rozanne has surpassed my expectations as a good container plant.  I might buy some and hold for fall planting.

Note:  Plant Brodiaea 'Queen Fabiola' in Vet Field garden.  Great blue for early summer.

Note: Plant Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’ in Vet Field garden. Great blue for early summer.

also...white and blue Nigella (love in a mist)

also…white and blue Nigella (love in a mist)…here in a planter near the LB pharmacy

The big planter by Lewis and Clark Square is a mish mash that I am not very happy about.  I have gone through phases in this planter.  The phormium phase…long gone.  The Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ phase.  Still pulling those as they come back.  I like the Erysimum.  Every time we tear into it to do it over, we manage to puncture some sprinkler hoses, thus not making parks manager Mike K happy.

what to do?

what to do?

I have tried to get rid of all the Lady’s Mantle and look how much has come back.  Oops.

Across the street from Home at the Beach, the painted sage is fabulous in a re-done planter.  Good, new soil has it thriving.

Salvia viridis about to pop

Salvia viridis about to pop

Kitty corner to that by an empty lot is a planter that continues to thwart me.  I keep thinning the yarrow, planted by a volunteer back in the day, in order to add more interest, and the yarrow keeps winning.  This is one that can only be fully changed by ripping out plants, soil and all and starting over.  It is pretty enough when the yarrow blooms….

kind of dull

kind of dull

The planter in front of Home at the Beach cheered me up again.

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

Calibrachoa 'Lemon Slice'

Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’

I made it through all the planters and walked past City Hall to join Allan on the beach approach.

City Hall Astilbe (north side)

City Hall Astilbe (north side)

I love Astilbes and should plant more in LB.

The wind knocked my prize goatsbeard specimen over so badly that we had had to cut half of it back off the sidewalk earlier in the week!

city hall

Now, the beach approach.  The rugosa roses, which have taken over the whole garden pretty much, are glorious right now.

pink ones

pink ones

single pink

single pink

slightly double pink

slightly double pink

pink

white

white

single white (Rosa rugosa alba)

single white (Rosa rugosa alba)

Coreopsis and roses

Coreopsis and roses

I checked the planters all the way to the end, where the two westernmost ones (planted with horribly dense vinca by volunteers way back when) have practically merged into the dunes.

almost a lost cause

almost a lost cause..and that dratted vinca

the westernmost planter

the westernmost planter

The last planter is just feet from the Long Beach boardwalk.  It could be so much better but we would have to tear out ALL the soil because of the dratted vinca and start over.  This has been the case with a number of the volunteer planters.  We manage to redo one or two a year.

The beach approach garden itself, due to our lack of time this week, did not get done as well as we could have with an extra day….the day we went to a sheltered garden to work instead because of 30 MPH winds.   We (especially Allan) did, however, make a difference.

before and after

before and after

Then we had to leave to get those three Ilwaco planters done.  They had been languishing in semi-hidden neglected spots in private yards; the city crew had gathered and emptied them and placed them for us to fill with soil and plants.

First, we did one in yellows down by the Portside Café.

yellow enhancing yellow

yellow enhancing yellow

golden thymes and marjoram, Erysimum 'Fragrant Sunshine'

golden thymes and marjoram, Erysimum ‘Fragrant Sunshine’

I will now illustrate with buckets how we found the planters placed this morning at the intersection of First and Spruce, where big trucks and trailers sometimes swing wide.

Can you see the faint tire tracks?

Can you see the faint tire tracks?  southeast corner

You can definitely see the tire tracks on the northeast corner!

You can definitely see the tire tracks on the northeast corner!

looking southwest

looking southwest; bucket marks where planter WAS placed

The planters would have been wiped out there, so Allan had moved them inboard.

looking east

looking east down Spruce

adding soil

adding soil

That odd little planter is left over from when there used to be a café and antique shop on this corner, whose owner had put out several containers of plants.

one...

one…

The planters are mismatched because I could not find any more good Erysimums for centerpieces.

The Hebe is a good center so I wish I had gotten two!

The Hebe is a good center so I wish I had gotten two!

That Hebe is left over from when I thought I needed one for a spot at Andersen’s RV Park…and didn’t…

When this job was done at sunset Friday evening, we had the refreshing feeling that we now had two days off!

home to a beautiful sunset, blissful prospect of leisure

home to a beautiful sunset, blissful prospect of leisure

Perhaps our plan of a Saturday taking photos at Saturday Market and then the Doggie Olympic Games was not entire a prospect of leisure, and not my perfect day off at home in the garden…but when I checked my email I realized we had to do a bit of work Saturday after all.

One of the port business owners wished to have her garden tidied, and while we did not need to jump to it, I did want to get it done for the fourth of July and especially for the Ilwaco sixth of July fireworks.  So in order to get it off the list, we did it Saturday late afternoon after Doggie Olympics.

hot and tedious work

hot and tedious work

but now it is done

but now it is done (too tired to straighten photo!)

We had a wonderful reward for doing that job when we did.  While dumping the debris out in the field at the east end of the port, we saw the Tall Ships set sail and were able to photograph them on their way to their Battle Cruise.  Cannons, sea shanties, climbing the rigging, and other delights awaited the passengers.  Well, the passengers were not made to climb the rigging, but I do believe they had to sing sea shanties.

We saw two ships go sailing out

We saw two ships go sailing out

Technically, they were motoring, not sailing, till they got farther out.

ships

ships

Avast, me hearties!

Avast, me hearties!

I reflected, as I often do, on what an amazing place Ilwaco is to live in.  Somehow, through a series of events that often seemed like mistakes, we ended up in this glorious place and with right livelihood.

ships

The Lady Washington and the Hawaiian Chieftan

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We began the day picking a bouquet in the rain for the Queen La De Da’s hospitality room that Jenna had set up to welcome the crew of the tall ships.  The Hawaiian Chieftan and The Lady Washington had arrived in the wet, rainy dawn to dock in Ilwaco through the weekend.

tall ship in the rain

tall ship in the rain

I didn’t remember to take a photo of the bouquet on the day;  I thought it was rather a good one with Alstrolemaria, Nigella (love in a mist), roses, and Knautia macedonica.

I got a photo on Saturday.

I got a photo on Saturday.

Because of the rain, we lingered for awhile at Olde Towne Café.  It was bustling with other like minded folk.

a busy day for Olde Towne!

a busy day for Olde Towne!

The rain was not letting up for us so we had to go on to work.  By the time we arrived at Diane’s garden next to The Red Barn we were pleasantly surprised by better weather.

next door to Diane's

next door to Diane’s, her sister Amy’s horse

Last time we worked at Diane’s I thought to myself that we had better put an edge on the new streetside before Larry got busy with the Roundup.  That day we were in a hurry, and then it slipped my mind.  Oops!  Larry had already sprayed by the time we came back.  It was a skilled spraying that did no damage to the garden, but I still think a line of dead grass looks worse than a line of live grass, even if it was going in to the garden.  (Left and middle, below).  But we fixed it.  (Nicely edged, right, below.)

streetside garden

streetside garden

We also added twenty Dianthis ‘Diana’, appropriately named and useful for filling in a new garden, especially for a client who likes pinks and pastels.

The Anchorage Cottages was next, where we found bees still all over the Ceanothus.

California lilac

California lilac

center courtyard

center courtyard

lily and Melianthus major in center courtyard

lily and Melianthus major in center courtyard

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

popular with bees

popular with bees

I had a flashback to childhood while deadheading the window boxes behind the viburnums near the office.

Viburnum and windowbox

Viburnum and windowbox

I smelled the same bitter foliage smell that I used to smell as a child, walking down the hill one half block from John B. Allen elementary school to my grandma’s house.  While weeding near another Viburnum at The Anchorage, I smelled it again.

more viburnum

more viburnum

And I smelled it again on the corner of the same garden….bitter, sour, and emanating from a leatherleaf viburnum.

leatherlead viburnum

leatherlead viburnum

I suddenly realized that the childhood smell had always come, after rain, from a “snowball bush” by the sidewalk…another kind of Viburnum.  Mystery solved:  Viburnums, especially when recently pruned or when the leaves have dropped, whether deciduous (like the snowball bush) or evergreen, stink when it rains!  I had always thought that smell was just damp rotting foliage in general.  I later googled the terms Viburnum and stink, and sure enough, I found a lot to back up the solving of a lifelong mystery.

After the Anchorage, we added some more red Dianthus to the Veterans Field garden.

Vet Field

Vet Field

In the Fifth Street Park, I may finally succeed this year in having three striped Cannas in the damp area in the southwest corner!

If they grow bigger:  success!

If they grow bigger: success!

You can see it was another grey, darkish day but at least it was not as windy as earlier in the week.  And I was loving the rain.  Not having to water gave us time to finish other work tasks. Lately we have been too busy to dine out at all.  I would love to have time to try the fish and chips or have a delicious crab roll at Captain Bob’s Chowder, now located behind the northwest corner of the Fifth Street Park.

Captain Bob's Chowder

Captain Bob’s Chowder and a daylily that I like

It’s been hard for the city crew to keep the lawns short with all the rain.

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

I tried growing sweet peas (annual) along the trellis at the back of the park and the slugs got them.  Then I planted some perennials ones, and the guy (not a city crew guy) who pruned the hedge walked back there.  Sigh.

where once sweet peas grew

where once sweet peas grew

Note:  It would be great to have blue and white Nigella (Love in a Mist) in the Veterans Field garden next year!

Note: It would be great to have blue and white Nigella (Love in a Mist) in the Veterans Field garden next year!  (Here it is in Fifth Street Park.)

Fifth Street Park, north west side

Fifth Street Park, north west side

Just south of the park by one of the street trees, you can see how much it had been raining.

much rain

much rain

Leaving Long Beach, we went to the Ilwaco Boatyard garden just to remove some poppies completely blown over by the wind.

I had no doubt the windstorms have stopped for the season.

I had no doubt the windstorms have stopped for the season.

boatyard

boatyard

The boatyard garden needs some serious horsetail control…

horsetail haven

horsetail haven

But we had other fish to fry.  We will time it for early next week so the garden looks perfect(ish) for the big fireworks day at the Port, July 6th.  The garden looks grand even now, especially if you squint.

boatyard

looking south

looking north

looking north

windblown

boatyard

I had realized in our midmorning stop at the port that the Marie Powell Gallery garden needed to have its sea thrift deadheaded.

not very attractive

not very attractive

Allan’s method was to give it a complete haircut.

a smooth pate

a smooth pate

I wanted to leave a few pink flowers, even though this is harder to achieve, for the many tourists who might come to see the Tall Ships this weekend.

more time consuming effect

more time consuming effect

Overall, both effects are pleasant.

Overall, both effects are pleasant.

The two year old Eryngium in the parking strip has thrown up lots of flowering stems.  I am thinking the harsher the environment, the more it flowers?

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I took a peek at the port, just at the other side of the gallery.  The Port Office still had its Basket Case hanging baskets down; they had stashed them on the north side of the building to protect them from wind.  Don Nisbett had his hanging back up again.

baskets

The weather warning flag showed that the wind had finally stopped.

calm at last

calm at last

calm water and a tall ship

calm water and a tall ship

One more job:  We wanted to pull out the huge dandelions from the garden by the public restroom and Ilwaco pavilion.  We have never been assigned to do this garden, but it bothers me.  We used to take care of it when we worked for Shorebank, before the bank changed names and before its resident botanist (who designed the garden) was laid off.

At least we got the dandelions out.

At least we got the dandelions out.

Sometimes it bothers me that the bank garden we used to care for, and quit due to being overbooked, has gone to such weediness.  Other times, like on this particular evening, I look at it and realize it is so far gone now I am just glad I am not the one who has to bring it back.

SEP: Someone Else's Problem

SEP: Someone Else’s Problem

One last look at the Port and a tall ship, and we were done for the day.

tall ship

the condor statue and a tall mast

the condor statue and a tall mast

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