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Posts Tagged ‘The Basket Case’

Continuing the unusually social week, Wednesday would be a slightly short day because of a social engagement.  No working till dusk-thirty!  (Monday we had quit early to have dinner at the Depot with friends of Allan’s and Tuesday we had spent, er, three hours! visiting with friends at Olde Towne.)

I had noticed the day before in Long Beach that we were losing the sidewalk to the south of the police station to rugosa roses.  It’s an important route because people walk it to get to Veterans Field and the farmer’s market on Friday afternoons.  So that was our first project for Wednesday.

before and after looking west

before and after looking west

before and after looking east

before and after looking east

All over town, the baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse are looking amazing.  We don’t water the baskets; the city crew does so every single day.

one of the police station baskets

one of the police station baskets

I checked the parks to the west across the street and found one hydrangea had been…jumped on? and partly broken.  It still had some good flowering branches.

Hydrangea from The Planter Box

Hydrangea from The Planter Box

backed with another Planter Box hydrangea

backed with another Planter Box hydrangea

I love hydrangeas for public gardens because they bloom in summer, unlike rhododrendrons which are just boring green by tourist season.

The Veterans Field garden is still a pretty good show of red white and blue.

Vet field

Vet field

I look forward to next year when the perennials have filled in more.

We checked on the Anchorage Cottages next and fertilized the containers and windowboxes.

Anchorage windowbox

Anchorage windowbox

Then we went south again to Long Beach to do something I had meant to do when we dumped our debris at City Works:   Check on Margaret and Larry’s garden nearby.  I am still frustrated with how slowly this garden is filling in, and looking at the photos I have had a revelation.  I need to give up on Cosmos and painted sage here and concentrate more on perennials.  The wind is fierce in this garden and it needs tougher plants.

It looks good when I focus in on the perennials!

It looks good when I focus in on the perennials!

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

a lovely sanguisorba

a lovely sanguisorba

Margaret and Larry’s gooseberries within the fence look attractive.  I remember weeding around some when I used to garden at China Beach Retreat, and that they were painfully thorny.  I am not sure if one is supposed to eat them raw but the berry I tried was pretty tasty.

gooseberries

gooseberries

Maybe if I planted some in my garden I would be further qualified for the edible garden tour.  (I’m still fretting mildly about being on that tour with so few edibles.)

From Long Beach we headed toward Andersen’s RV Park but via the Basket Case so I could get myself, Marilyn and Nancy (garden tour organizer) one of those Banana Cream Shasta daisies!

Banana Cream, perfect name for this colour

Banana Cream, perfect name for this colour

I could not resist this gorgeous 'Sahin's Early Flowerer' Helenium.

I could not resist this gorgeous ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ Helenium.

When we got to Andersen’s RV Park, I remembered how much Lorna loves Shasta Daisies AND yellow flowers, so she got “my” Banana Cream;  I’ll get myself another one later.

west garden

west garden

Sadly, the best show from the poppies in the west garden is over.  I’m glad they were at their peak for the Sisters on the Fly gathering.

Payson Hall Planters

Payson Hall Planters

Lily 'Landini' in the picket fence garden

Lily ‘Landini’ in the picket fence garden

After Andersen’s, we had our first social occasion of the day, driving down the one lane N Alley to see the Deemers’ garden which is going to be on the garden tour (July 20th!).  On the way we passed a lovely landscaping by what looks like a cottage but is actually one of the original traincars of the Clamshell Railroad.

clamshell car

clamshell car

Laura Deemer was at work…I had not been able to schedule the visit because had not known for sure if we would have enough time between jobs.  So we walked around the garden with her husband and took photos.  I can’t share many because they would be spoilers for the tour but here are three teasers:

Deemer garden

Deemer garden

We had been making very good time all day so we managed to get down to Ilwaco in time to not only water the planters but also to do some weeding in the boatyard garden and water the Time Enough Books garden.  There was still a long stretch of boatyard to do before Saturday…

in the boatyard garden

in the boatyard garden

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' at the boatyard

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ at the boatyard

Time Enough Books

Time Enough Books

We’d had a pleasant fantasy of dinner out before our 7:30 PM social time.  First we tried Don’s Portside Café; we thought their new dinner hours included Wednesday.  Closed.  Then we tried OleBob’s Café, hoping they were open till at least five thirty.  Closed.  So we did the work while hungry and then had a very quick bite at home…then walked five doors down to do some porch sitting with hors d’oeuvres at Larry and Robert’s vintage house along with our dear friends Tom and Judy.  (Our quick bite at home kept us from making pigs of ourselves.)

porch sitting

porch sitting

Hilarity ensued from 7:30 all the way till almost 10:30; the only thing that broke up the party was the onset of loud personal fireworks nearby.  Judy and Tom’s dog Towbeh would be terrified alone with such booming racket, so they had to go to their home just east across the street to give moral support.  (Beep and Stymie are made of sterner stuff.)

It is a dream come true to have such good neighbours on Lake Street.

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Wednesday, we added a Brunnera ‘Looking Glass’ to fill in a space in Mayor Mike’s garden…

much better!

much better!

admired this combo at our Ilwaco Post Office volunteer garden:

Asiatic lily and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Asiatic lily and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Note:  Mike’s garden, which we just started doing this year, needs some white lilies.

We stopped at The Basket Case Nursery, where Walter greeted us.

Walter, one of three poodles

Walter, one of three poodles

Next, we stopped at The Planter Box for more Dr. Earth organic caterpillar spray and to confirm the date (July 18th!) when they will be “cash mobbed”.  (Later in the week, we got back to “the caterpillar job” and decided not to spray again.  There were just a few left and we did not want to hurt the busy bees.)

at The Planter Box

at The Planter Box

Next, on to Andersen’s RV Park.  From here on, it would be a “north end day”.  I like a north end day because the gardens are all favourites of ours and it is easier to do two hours here and two there with a car ride in between than a steady slog at one garden all day.

Andersen's west garden

Andersen’s west garden

Baptisia australis backed with Stipa gigantea

Baptisia australis backed with Stipa gigantea

west side garden with Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

west side garden with Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

west side

west side

Staffer Rob Rosett had taken some wonderful photos of the Sisters on the Fly gathering.  Here he is in the office with two of them.

Rob Rosett

Rob Rosett

Stunning photos, eh?

On our way north to our next job, we stopped at our friend Sarah Sloane‘s home to drop off a couple of roses for her garden.  I was smitten with the Dianthus in her neighbour’s window box.  The apartment complex has sweet garden beds.  I was distracted by conversation and forgot to take more photos.

at South Wind Apartments

at South Wind Apartments

Klipsan Beach Cottages came next.

at KBC

at KBC

fenced garden

fenced garden

roses

roses

lilies

lilies

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

The week of rain had been hard on some of the roses.

unopened buds

unopened buds

That rose looked fine once we pruned it.  (Down to the next junction with five leaves.)

all better

all better

This rose was just fine despite rain.

This rose was just fine despite rain.

I decided a tree in the lower fenced garden (where the fence protects raspberries, a fig tree, apple trees and more roses) should be limbed up for the sake of the plants underneath. “No sooner said than done” Allan had already cut one branch by the time I took the before photo.

(sort of) before and after

(sort of) before and after

By the drive up the the cottages, the foxgloves were still going strong although the unseasonable strong winds of the last week pushed them sideways.

entry sign

entry sign

To the south of that sign, I have a river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (plant of the century!)

Rozanne blooming in shade

Rozanne blooming in shade

Because I love fuchsias, there are several, including one of my favourites:

Fuchsia 'Hawkshead', white with green tips

Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’, white with green tips

Hawkshead is a tall one.

Hawkshead is a tall one.

Behind it, a Callistemon still blooms.

bottlebrush

bottlebrush

Next, we stopped to deadhead Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ (three big ones!) at Oman Builders Supply in Ocean Park.

OBS garden

OBS garden

And we concluded our workday at The Weigardt Gallery (which had closed by the time we got there).

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardt Gallery

the north side, showing Eric's upstairs studio

the north side, showing Eric’s upstairs studio

By the time we left there, it was 6:30 PM.  Since I’d been to Marilyn’s garden with Nancy on Sunday on our pre-tour look at the tour gardens, and since rain had been falling on us off and on all day, we knew it would not need watering.  We were both rather damp and tired so we ended the workday early and headed home.

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Our day began with a brief stop at the Basket Case to buy three plants to fill spaces in Long Beach planters.  Of course, we bought a flat of plants once I had walked through a couple of times, including another Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, so now there are but three left!

Of other plants that I feel are treasures of which only a few are left, you can see (below) on the left, an Azara microphylla, beautiful little tree (one left!) with vanilla or chocolate scented flowers in late winter, and on the right, Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’ (only a couple left) and a wonderfully crisp looking white Phygelius.

choice selections

choice selections

We then met Nancy, garden tour organizer, at one of the 2013 gardens to get some teaser photos for the Music in the Gardens tour Facebook page, and I was deeply impressed.  I don’t want to give too much away but:

sneaking a peak!

sneaking a peak!

It is one of my favourite kinds of gardens, with room after room, each with a different feel.  It is the sort of garden I especially admire (ironic because of my business!), where all the work is done by the owners.

We tore ourselves away reluctantly.  Allan went to work at Andersen’s RV Park while Nancy and I went south to see two other gardens that would be on the tour.  She was impressed with both.  While at the first garden (Jo’s), I got some birds for Mr. Tootlepedal.

a baby?

a baby?  It could fly.

a hummingbird.  I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

a hummingbird. I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

Nancy and I then went to the nearby Boreas Inn so I could show her our deer resistant west side garden beds there, and I took the opportunity to show off the inside of the inn, as well.  It is an honour to be associated with such a gorgeous place.  This gave me some different views of the garden.

looking at entry garden from upstairs

looking at entry garden from upstairs (through impressionist screen)

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

That’s the tree featured in our post about having to clean up after other garden services!  I would drop a couple of feet off the top of it so one is not always fighting it for the view.  Or I would, shockingly, cut it down and plant another Eucalyptus off to the side.  They grow fast and I do love them.

After this pleasant hour or more of goofing off, I rejoined Allan at Andersen’s and we both worked on weeding the big west side garden.

west garden

west garden, 2:28 PM

I had three brainstorms while there.  The first was to widen a path to make it more inviting to walk past the blowsy poppies to the bench, moving rocks and replanting some small poppy seedlings further in to the bed.

in progress

in progress

The second was that the area around the big piece of driftwood should turn back into lawn.  The plants there are infested with couch grass, and it is the last place we get around to weeding.

2:28 PM, a big "before" mess

2:28 PM, a big “before” mess

The very energetic Al is a staffer there who is always looking for a project.  All I had to do was mention my idea to him, and he was off to get the big weedeater.

2:33 PM, "No Sooner Said Than Done" Al.

2:33 PM, “No Sooner Said Than Done” Al.

3:12 PM

3:12 PM

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

I also made a straight rather than curved line at another edge of the west garden, to eliminate a dull and weedy area that would better off as mown grass.

more sensible

more sensible

I hope I am getting older and wiser and not just older and lazier, but it makes sense to remove a few difficult spots in order to put more attention on the beautiful parts of the garden.

west bed, 3:37 PM

west bed, 3:37 PM

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

picket fence garden

picket fence garden

We made a quick trip to the Planter Box to get one plant (a red Geum) that I needed to balance a Long Beach planter, and while we were there, we picked up some annuals for an area that the inimitable Al had weeded for us earlier that day.  That was so wonderful because the weeding had been on my list of projects and I did not have to do it!

two hardworking Allans

two hardworking Allans

Al hung some floats on the fence that used to be on the driftwood around which he had weedeated, while Allan planted the annuals and I weeded a sweet pea area.  Those two are the two hardest working people I have ever known.

My original plan had been to do Klipsan Beach Cottages and Wiegardt Gallery as well as Andersen’s, but at almost five o clock I decided we should save them for tomorrow and head back south to do the Anchorage Cottages garden….

Anchorage courtyard

Anchorage courtyard

…and plant the rest of the Long Beach plants so I can call that planting project done for 2013!  What an accomplishment.  Every space in every planter is now filled, or so I believe.  I had time to check the block and half of tree and planter gardens that I skipped yesterday so we could go nursery shopping.

under a street tree:  This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe 'Boughton's Dome'

under a street tree: This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’

There are a few street trees under which I would like to add more perennials, perhaps hardy fuchsias.   The tree gardens are a pain to water, so I may have missed the time frame when the plants would easily establish and not need coddling.

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

Finally, we weeded the streetside garden at Time Enough Books, long overdue for the removal of tiny grasses.   The difficult to work in light of late evening brought the day to a close….

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

light over the boat storage yard

evening light over the boat storage yard

Home at last, Allan mowed some lawn while I dealt with tomorrow’s plants (for Gene’s garden) and picked up some of the empty flowerpots strewn around the garden.  If we can get Gene’s planting, weeding at KBC and Wiegardt Gallery, and a brief stop at Golden Sands done tomorrow, we can have the next day off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On the way to another day of planting in Long Beach (that’s Washington, not California), we stopped to plant two Diascia ‘Blue Denim’ (or ‘Denim Blue’) by Azure salon.  That’s our little theme for Ilwaco:  yellow or orange flowers for the yellow café, blue for the Azure Salon.  Then a quick compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café, where we found that great strides had been made over the past week in the antiques rooms at the back of the shop.

looking into the back rooms

looking into the back rooms

I took some photos for their Facebook page but did not have time for a coffee break.  In fact, I had awoken at eight AM in great anxiety about work but did not feel I should wake Allan early because I would be rather annoyed if he got a burst of early morning work energy and woke me early.  (We are both chronic night owls and at least we are compatible in our schedule;  my ex the famous mystery writer Chris used to be up, breakfasted, and returning from several yard sales before I even opened my eyes on Saturday morning!  I always felt I had missed out on some good yard sale acquisitions.)

But I digress.  My anxiety was mainly because I suddenly felt we simply MUST redo the planter in front of the charming shop called Home at the Beach before they are the featured  Peninsula Cash Mob site on Saturday.  And then the planter across the street would have to match.  Both were full of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.  That’s a perennial I once loved and now view with suspicion.  I once thought it was a good plant because it does not spread like the similar orange montbretia, , but it will take over a spot and spear through all surrounding plants.  I regret ever having planted it in any of the Long Beach planters.

Sheila and I attended a Hardy Plant Society study weekend where Adrian Bloom, whose nursery introduced ‘Lucifer’ to the gardening world, was the keynote speaker.  The emcee introduced him partly with the questions “How many of you grow Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’…and how many of you are trying to get rid of it?”  The audience laughed as we almost all raised our hands to both questions.  Adrian defended it as a very good plant (which it really is if one has the room).  He also is the one who introduced many many other great plants including one of my all time favourites, Geranium ‘Rozanne’.

So first we watered and added some annuals to the southernmost street planters and planted some cosmos (tall) in the Fifth Street park and then….the difficult task began.

before

before

When it blooms, the Crocosmia gets so tall it somewhat blocks the view of the shop.  I want prettier things with longer than a three week bloom period for the nice owners.

Allan begins to dig

Allan begins to dig

The last time we removed Crocosmia from a planter, our shovel broke (and the manufacturer, Fiskars, honoured their lifetime guarantee!)

the planter across the street

the planter across the street

These planters were two of four that I did as a volunteer way back in ’99 or 2000 when the planters were first installed.  They were installed without a maintenance plan other than perhaps volunteers would take them over, and later every other one was replaced with a street tree.  Then city administrator Nabiel Shawa said mine were “magnificent” and that’s what began the series of events that got me my Long Beach gardening job.  Originally the one across the street had no working water so was planted to be drought tolerant with Santolina, Geranium macrorrhizum, variegated bulbous oat grass and the Crocosmia and some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  It worked, because the plantings have lasted for all these many years, but I am just tired of the same old thing.

While Allan dug (it took well over an hour if not more!), I watered and planted Cosmos and painted sage and some sanvitalia and calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’ (yum!) in several of the planters on the blocks to the south.

empty centers

empty centers

The lavenders and sedums around the edges are just fine with me and can stay.

A trip to The Planter Box got us some painted sage and diascia and agyranthemums and at The Basket Case we added some different agyrs and different diascia and a lot of Cosmos ‘Sonata’ (the short one).

Fred and Nancy of The Basket Case have us shop in the back greenhouse so we don’t deplete the displays up front of all our favourites, and while there we met their son’s lovely old dog, Biggins.

a very sweet boy

a very sweet boy

And here are the planters later in the day, all nicey nice.

after

after

across the street, after

across the street, after

The old Adopt a Planter sign has not showed for years since it was covered with the hardy geranium!

historic sign

historic sign

We took a short breather to consume the delicious cupcakes that Home at the Beach owners Kathy and Karyn had brought us from the new Sweet Celebrations cupcake shop.  Then we kept going till 8 PM, watering and planting.  We parked for part of the time near the new Veterans Field garden which looks more filled in than last week.

Veterans Field

Veterans Field

Veterans Field

Perhaps the worst of annuals hell is already over.  Planting the Long Beach planters is the hardest spring planting job because of working in traffic, watching for cars, people honking in a friendly way (but still startling!) and just the sheer size of it.  We will go through again adding more but the basic annuals planting is done now.

And now only ONE planter has lots of Crocosmia.   It is in front of Wind World Kites and the owner actually loves the plant and does not mind the way it sort of hides the shop at its peak, so we will leave it there for him.  It is also under several street trees and tends to bloom like fireworks right around the fourth of July, making the town look festive.

The dry weather has put us behind on our other jobs (watering Long Beach took precedence) so tomorrow after taking photos at Saturday Market and Cash Mob we hope to get to at least two, preferably three gardens up north.

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And so the planting continues.  I got off lightly as till the last job I just planted in containers and did pruning and weeding while Allan got the plants into the ground.

First:  Larry and Robert’s garden.  This satisfying project from last year, just half a block from our house and across Pearl from the Hornbuckle garden,  is looking very nice indeed, and got some of my two favourite perennials, Eryngium and Agastache, as well as three of one my favourite annuals, Nicotiana langsdorfii.

Larry and Robert's garden boat

Larry and Robert’s garden boat

narcissi

narcissi

corner garden

corner garden

I am so happy to see that their brand new Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ (background, above) has tiny new leaves coming out (as does mine at home).

Muscari 'Ocean Magic'

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’

Then we added some plants to the Port Office garden:

Allan planting at port office

Allan planting at port office…foreground: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

We did some weeding in the Howerton Street curbside gardens, including Time Enough Books:

Time Enough Books garden boat

Time Enough Books garden boat

tulips in the boat

tulips in the boat

Fuchsia magellanica about to bloom in the boat...already!

Fuchsia magellanica about to bloom in the boat…already!

early tulip by Howerton Street

early tulip by Howerton Street

Down the block we added some plants (Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and three different santolinas) to the gardens by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

Allan planting again

Allan weeds while I set the plants out 

Tulips by Queen La De Da's; these were just in bud last time...

Tulips by Queen La De Da’s; these were just in bud last time

Narcissi with tiny cup

Narcissi with tiny cup

how the garden related to Queen La De Da's

how the garden relates to Queen La De Da’s

Then we took some plants to Nancy’s fine new garden border.  The sun was all brighty-shady, hard to get a good photo of the whole thing.

Nancy's garden

Nancy’s garden

halfway up

halfway up

Narcissi with pale apricot cups

Narcissi with pale apricot cups

tulips

tulip

Because of all the exciting new plants and especially the tulips, Phil has built a handsome fence around the garden.  I will remember to photograph the fence next time.  Today the spring bulbs distracted me.

Next we put some blue and red plants into the garden at Veterans Field in Long Beach:  Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Lobelia tupa.  The Lobelia tupa tag says it wants a sheltered location, and this is pretty exposed, so I am only trying four of them here.

veterans field

Veterans Field

I bet the builders are feeling the pressure to get the stage building done before dedication day on  May 5th.

Veterans Field

Veterans Field from the entrance point off the main LB street

Above:  Allan is walking toward me because we have a brief non-gardening mission: to get a treat from a new shop.

Sweet Celebrations, new shop just south of the LB Pharmacy

Sweet Celebrations, new shop just south of the LB Pharmacy

We had delicious cupcakes, me tiramisu and Allan 'smores flavour.

We had delicious cupcakes, me tiramisu and Allan ‘smores flavour.

At the entrance garden to Veterans Field, we planted a blue potato vine (Solanum crispum ‘Glasnevin’).   Once upon a time a huge one grew here.

baby blue potato vine

baby blue potato vine (Can you see it?)

once upon a time...

once upon a time…

Yes, that plant above is a blue potato vine reaching the very top of the Funland buildings wall.  It was a showstopper.  The Big Blow of 2007 took it down.

Back then the darn Phormiums were not huge in this garden.  I would love to have them removed but I believe the garden belongs to Funland, not the city.

huge and accursed Phormiums

huge and accursed Phormiums

I really do like the way I pruned the tree, though; it was sticking branches out over the sidewalk.

well behaved tree now

well behaved tree now

After hurriedly eating our scrumptuous cupcakes we hastened to The Anchorage Cottages and planted two more blue potato vines in the spots were two Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ roses had grown till last year.  Those roses want to cover a building and were instead on low railings around the courtyard, constantly sending poky branches into the walkways, suffering from blackspot, and looking amazing only for their brief period of bloom.   Rose branches also loved to jump forward to the corner chairs where guests were trying to lounge in peace.

Allan planting the replacements

Allan planting a replacement for the rose

potato vine in the other corner

potato vine in the other corner

I am sure they will do well, as once I had this Solanum up and over the center courtyard arch but it had to be cut back severely for the arch to be re-stained and then it died.

Meanwhile, I planted a few plants in the containers around the entrance and in the courtyard and enjoyed the tulips while exercising care to not snap any off.

office courtyard

office courtyard

pinky green bud

pinky green bud

deep luscious red

deep luscious red

aglow

aglow

I had a desperate urge for more Lobelia tupa and Sanguisorbas so rushed off next to The Basket Case, but first detoured to see a tree whose beauty had been recommended by Theresa from The Planter Box garden centre.

just wow

just wow

Basket Case, middle greenhouse

Basket Case, middle greenhouse

At the Basket Case, we got our perennials and could see the big middle greenhouse with many annuals coming on.  Between here and The Planter Box we will acquire the plants for Annuals Planting Hell starting around Mother’s Day and going frantically till it is done.

I needed to figure out how to end the gardening day and decided on a project which turned out to be much easier than I thought it would be.  In three of the Long Beach planters grew six large Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’, a lovely feathery flowered plant that had turned out to be much taller than I had expected and thus tended to flop into the street.  I wanted to move them into the rather moist Fifth Street Park.  They came out like a dream!

two of the six pink elephants

two of the six pink elephants

Then into the park they went, along with some of the other cultivars I had gotten at the Basket Case.

Fifth Street Park, one area

Fifth Street Park, one area

I think they will do very well with Cosmos in this park.  It looks tatty now with lots of spent crocus foliage but does look well in summer (and earlier when the crocuses are in bloom).

I adore Sanguisorbas and have done ever since I saw them in a slideshow by Piet Oudolf at the Northwest Flower and Garden show some years ago.  Back then they were hard to find.  I ordered some from Dan Hinkley’s Heronswood when the cultivar names were just DJH (his initials) and a number.  Now I can get several cultivars from the Basket Case via Blooming Nursery and that makes me very happy.

While passing through Long Beach today I saw one of the regulars there, a fellow who walks around town during the day.  He waved, I waved, and I suddenly felt quite swept with joy at what a fun job we have working in a cute little beachy tourist town.

On the way home we stopped by Nancy and Phil’s again and they gave us some clams which, as I write this, Allan is cooking per Nancy’s instructions, and again we will be eating at about 10 PM.  The earlier part of the at-home evening was spent refurbishing a Facebook page for the Water Music Festival so blogging got a late start.  How I will manage to blog when the daylight time gets longer I do not know.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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