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Posts Tagged ‘The English Nursery’

Monday, 9 July 2018

Shelburne Hotel

We began our work today with a project: cleaning out some old dead pots of plants up on the hotel’s second floor decks and balconies.  I had not been up there for a decade.  I must say that I no longer prance easily up the stairs.

Before we went in, I took photos outside because the grey cloudy light made the garden look quite fine.

The stained glass panels above the peaked roof with arched window form the edge of one of the decks.

sweet peas all along the picket fence by the sidewalk

Yes, I am obsessed with this garden.

Ok, enough of that!  Up the stairs we went with a couple of buckets of potting soil. Allan did almost all the schlepping of soil and eventually plants today.

In the deck off room 4, we found two pots to redo and one that was salvageable.  We could tell they had mostly been filled with perennials from the garden.  I had not realized till recently that there were still pots up on these decks.

room four from its private deck

This deck used to be shared with room 10 ( think)  but it is now all 4’s.

the view to the west over the roofs of the kitchen and bakery

This pot, emptied, went to the back garden when we realized it had no drainage hole.

still alive, with fennel and lemon balm

better

To replace the pot with no hole, Allan brought in the potted rose from the porch above the pub deck.  Now we won’t have to worry about watering it and having waterfalls cascading onto the diners.

With two big pots empty and the dry soil and plants in garbage bags, we emptied and refilled the small pots on the three south balconies.

view from the western room down to the totem pole shade garden

and the totem pole

The three south balconies and the room 4 deck can only be accessed when no one has rented those rooms.  So the three south balconies would get succulents that don’t need much water.

We turned to the front deck, which is accessed by two rooms and also from the hallway.  There is a water faucet there that must be got working again so the plants can be watered. (The next morning I happened to see our friend Don Anderson the plumber, who cares for the Shelburne, and he will make that happen.)  Otherwise we have to find an empty room, fill a small bucket at the bathroom sink, and clean up any mess we make, or haul water up the stairs.  I look forward to having that faucet back.

center deck

Nandina with old English ivy growing on a bamboo pole and an old branch! Odd, and it is a noxious weed here.

I fought the English ivy out of the pot and Allan cleaned the other pot of dead plants.  I decided a nandina, to match, would be best for now.  It is actually a bit too sunny for them here, but later they can go in the garden.  It will be a battle (maybe impossible!) to get the one out of the pot with the small opening.  I would rather do that battle this fall.

the other pot before emptying it

Big garbage bags of dead plants and dry rooty soil were hauled downstairs by Allan, along with multiple buckets.  I was worried when he came back upstairs looking quite spent.

I had to go into my favourite room, the one above the pub that has the second story porch that used to have a potted rose.

inside the most beautiful room of all

window and door to private porch with stairs down to dining deck and garden

This room has its own sitting room behind stained glass windows.

With a writing desk.

Back to deck four with the rose, and a pot with fresh soil.

and the hallway deck

I had to go down the stairs backwards; fortunately, I know of a set of stairs that does not go to the lobby.

More garden admiration on the way out:

I thought maybe the English Nursery, just a few blocks south, might have a nandina.  It did not, but I did get three good succulents and a pretty scabiosa there.

Allan’s photo; yes, the owners, Dirk and Jane, are English. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

English Nursery daylilies

Hostas are their specialty.

We returned to the Shelburne and went upstairs just to put three Sedum ‘October Daphne’ in the three balcony pots.  Well….Allan went upstairs.

the three balconies

I put some water in the pot with no hole to see if it would drain at all.

And then off we went, supposedly to water in Long Beach.  A light misty rain began.  I was suddenly so exhausted I could not face watering the Long Beach planters.  The half hour of mist made it possible to put the watering off till tomorrow (we decided after a drive through town to make sure).

I felt so deeply tired that I could have laid down in the dirt and slept..and I am not a napper at all.  Yet I gave the Planter Box a call and learned that they had a nice nandina….and we were off!

at the Planter Box, many reasonably priced plants

I had planned to finish the Shelburne pots  Wednesday…but I couldn’t wait.  We would have gone to the Basket Case, too, had they not been closed on Monday and Tuesday.

Garden hint of the week: When we got back to the Shelburne, I was fussing with the nandina to get a dandelion out of the root ball.  Allan had a genius idea and pulled the root out with pliers.

It worked a treat.

All the plants got schlepped up to the second floor by Allan.  (We had left some potting soil up there.)

the stairs going up (Shelburne photo)

The center balcony got a (sort of) matching nandina.

Allan’s photo

A crock in the corner got a little lemon cypress, heathers, sedums, all for texture.

New pots are going to be acquired by next year.  The planting in the crock is temporary and not ideal because that crock has no hole.  It won’t get too much water this summer.  I hope.

center deck all cleaned and swept and nice; the skylight is over the dining room.

Cypress looks like a beacon from the hallway.

The replanted pot on the number four deck has a rescued dahlia with one stem and an almost invisible dahlia in the middle that I took pity on.  I now think I should have put the tiny dahlia in the garden and put something better in the middle.

Little dahlia has one week to hurry up and fill in or else.

We added to the south balcony pots.

pots on the three little balconies

Here are some views from those three balconies:

The water was slowly draining out of that pot.

And some interiors of those three rooms:

Down the stairs again, one trip for me, several for Allan, who had a second wind.

My back stairs way, that goes down into the dining room that is only open for dinner Friday and Saturday.

I fixed up one more dead pot on a downstairs deck.

shady end of the front garden

After all that, we still had to water…

Ilwaco.

Allan got the water trailer and watered the street trees and planters while I watered the boatyard.

A touch of finger blight:

pulled out elephant garlic

Someone picked poppy seeds and left a mess…so rude.

I weeded four buckets of weeds and then did the watering.

Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’

santolina flowers

daisy…from Jo’s garden originally.

elephant garlic and a please don’t pick flowers sign

Angels’ Choir poppies

Several of the boat owners were most complimentary about the garden today, including one from Westport who recognized the names of Terri and Bill, whose garden is on the July 14th tour.

his boat

watering obstacle course

I had to go around the big boats twice to get to the hoses.

After finishing the boatyard watering, I truly could hardly walk.

8:30 PM

Allan took me home and then went back out to water the post office and fire station (our volunteer gardens).

post office at dusk (Allan’s photo)

I am anxiously counting the days until the July 14th tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday we were still somewhat in garden tour mode as we were picking up and delivering some of the Edible Tour canned food to the non-vehicular abode of Lisa, tour organizer.  The tickets were purchased with either money or cans of food, all to benefit our local food banks.

First, we stopped at The English Nursery, one of the four ticket sales points.  Owner Dirk had a bag of canned food for us and en envelope of ticket money.

English Nursery in Seaview

English Nursery in Seaview

birdhouses for sale

birdhouses for sale

open

Dirk Sweringen

Dirk Sweringen

One of the specialities of the English Nursery is a great collection of hostas.

also perennials and ornamental grasses

also perennials and ornamental grasses

plants

plants

Dirk is also a photographer and is working on developing the building on the property into a gallery (and once upon a time he said a teahouse, an idea we quite like).

Dirk's photos

Dirk’s photos

When I told him how few people had attended the tour, Dirk proposed what I think it an absolutely brilliant idea.  Why not have the edible tour be on the Sunday after the Saturday Music in the Gardens tour?    It could be advertised as “Garden Tour Weekend at the Beach.”  Hotels could offer special deals, like “book our garden tour weekend package and get tour tickets” sort of thing.  The edible tour would have to start earlier than noon, eleven at least, because visitors would be touring before returning home to the cities.  I think the gardens would look better on the third weekend in July (although fewer ripe tomatoes).  What do you think?  I have since run this idea past both tour organizers and it is being…thought about.

Next we stopped at The Planter Box to drop off ours and the Karnofskis’ garden tour signs.  (The signage is very good for the edible tour, nice big wooden signs…so we can’t blame that for the lack of visitors!)  The owners of the Planter Box are very involved with the local grange which provides the signs.  We picked up more canned food bags.  Now that the tour was over, I did not have to buy any more soil for all my edible garden containers!

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

Teresa, Ray Millner’s daughter, was pleased to hear that his garden talk had been a big hit with tour goers.

We had to dump some debris left over from our last week’s jobs, so a stop at Peninsula Landscape Supply (where Mike makes his own mulch from yard debris)  was in order.  Look at the beautiful colour of the hemlock bark:

hemlock to the right

hemlock to the right

It is completely beyond me why I see, on garden tours, gardens mulched with red bark.  WHY?  WHY? when this natural, dark colour that looks good with our beachscapes is so readily available.  WHY?  (I am still pained by red bark that I saw on recent tour gardens, but I am too kind to rant about it on an entry about any particular garden because I don’t want to hurt the owners’ feelings.)  Our business motto is “Just say no to barkscapes” but what I really object to is RED barkscaping.

In order to pick up one more tour sign, we stopped at the Patten garden.  Andrea was home and showed us the oven where she does her Wholesome Hearth baking (available at a booth on Fridays from 4-7 PM in Long Beach at the Farmers Market).

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

dahlias in front of the bakery

dahlias in front of the bakery

Andrea told me that she had had about 27 tour guests (4 more than us!!) and that one group had arrived on motorcycles.  They did not come to our place which is a shame as Allan would have enjoyed that.  Because the Patten garden is in mid Peninsula, their guests were staggered all day long, so she did not have the long empty-of-new-guests stretch in the middle of the tour that we had!

Finally, we got to Lisa’s Homewood garden.  It had been a favourite of mine on the previous year’s edible tour and once again I was very taken with it.

With the lot facing south and lots of sun, she has a beautiful group of sunflowers in bloom.

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sun

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homewood

Homewood:  the garden shed 

compost

The house was built by Lisa and her husband and catches lots of solar heat.

lots of sun for asparagus

Asparagus thrives in the sunny south garden.

homewood

We piled up the food cans (5 cans bought a ticket to the edible tour) in the garden for a photo; there were still some more to collect from the ticket sales at Jimella’s Café but it would be closed til Thursday.  I suppose there would be none from Adelaide’s, the ticket sales place that was, for whatever reason, CLOSED on the Sunday of the tour!!  (See previous entry for how that inconvenienced would-be tour goers.)  I have ideas about that now…There could have been another store on the same block, say…Bay Avenue Gallery…that might have been asked to take over the ticket sales at the north end on that day!….or some plan other than people driving all the way up there and finding no tickets were available in Ocean Park!  I am all exclamation-pointy about this because it still really bothers me that this happened and that the northernmost garden, Lavender And, lost out on some tour goers…and maybe we all did!)

After a long visit with Lisa in her living room (procrastinating because the day was hot) and with Patty from Lavender And who dropped by for awhile, we went to work at Golden Sands.  Just as I was reaching in the back of the car for my hand tools, my hand hit upon another plastic bag…of food cans!  Argh!   Back to Homewood we went…and took another set of photos of a much more impressive stack on cans.

cans

cans

The heat was still not inspiring us to go to work (I suppose it might have been as high as 79 degrees!) but we had to…so, back to Golden Sands.  The sprinkler problem (lack thereof) continued there, so some of our time was devoted again to hand watering rather than weeding.    This time, though, I was determined to get the place looking better so we had not scheduled much other work for the day and took some extra time…

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum's old room)

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum’s old room)

Her dahlias are looking fine.

Her dahlias are looking fine.

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

although there is still so very much to do.

although there is still so very much to do.

I could almost visualize the pitiful Geranium ‘Rozanne’ river in the center filling out if the sprinkler system gets fixed.  It was actually showing some blue.  At over two years old, these poor plants are a good example of stress from lack of water…Hand watering once a week is not enough.

hope

We closed out the workday with watering the Ilwaco planters and weeding and watering at the boatyard.

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

further north

further north

love the name of this boat

love the name of this boat

And then…home for a bit of a beautiful evening in our garden.

screened south window view

screened south window view

Below:  I had painstakingly picked every dried leaf from the stems of the Eupatorium (Joe Pye weed) below, in the gloaming on the night before our edible garden tour day.

front garden

front garden

Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' in front garden

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ in front garden

Dichroa febrifuga

Dichroa febrifuga

I could now declare that Garden Tour Season 2013 officially over (until the Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour on September 14th) and it was about time we started to seriously apply ourselves to make enough money to get through the winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Springtime always involves two months of the rounds of nurseries, first for perennials then annuals. Here, The Planter Box, which to this day grows lots of cosmos and painted sage for me. Teresa is in the doorway.

Planter Box 2001

Planter Box 2001

Back then, Clarke Nursery was still in business on the bay, and what an excellent nursery it was.  Owner Steve Clarke specialized in rhododendrons (which I don’t especially like) but had a good variety of other shrubs, grasses, and perennials.  He still has a tiny nursery in Seaview (by appointment) and does landscape design from Gearhart to Surfside.

Clarke Nursery 2001

Clarke Nursery 2001

The English Nursery is still in operation on the corner of 101 and 103 in Seaview, and now has owner Dirk Sweringen’s photography gallery as well.

The English Nursery 2001

The English Nursery 2001

And farther afield, we would sometimes go to Raintree Nursery past Seaside, Oregon.  I liked it better back then before it became part of the Seven Dees chain…It seemed to have more unusual, collectible plants.  (Update, January 2016: Over the years, Seven Dees has begun to feature collectible plants again and is worth the trip.)

Raintree Nursery in 2001

Raintree Nursery in 2001

 

 

 

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