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Posts Tagged ‘The Red Barn’

Tuesday, 23 July 2019

Tuesdays have become the day that we make the rounds of the small jobs and sometimes the Long Beach parks.

Norwood garden

Two doors down, we weeded and deadheaded.

My decision to weed turned out to be a good one.  I had forgotten it was Oregon Tuna Classic in Ilwaco this weekend, a fishing tournament that benefits the local food bank, and the Norwoods had a lot of guests. I am glad the garden looked good!

The Red Barn

We watered and weeded extra well because the Long Beach Rodeo would be this weekend at the Saddle Club next door.  I am sure the event spills over onto the Red Barn grounds with extra horses and riders getting ready.

Tigridia (Mexican Shell Flower)

I picked off this perfectly good flower.

That is pre-emptive deadheading.  The flowers only last for a day, and more will come on for the weekend.

buds coming on
Allan’s photo

 Diane’s garden

Of course, I felt sad because my very good, very elderly canine friend Misty is no more.

The septic vault garden:

deadheading with the new long handled pruners (Allan’s photo)

container garden (Allan’s photo)

The roadside garden:

sweet pea success

The Planter Box

We made a quick excursion to The Planter Box to get some plants to replace the shrubs that we’d removed from Mike’s garden.  I found some excellent lavenders.

Long Beach

We tidied the Veterans Field garden and noticed the clever way the city crew lawn mower moved the picnic tables.

pushing the tables around with the riding mower

We finished weeding the beach approach garden. The wildflowers did grow from seed but are awfully small.

One of the tough perennial coreopsis with moth

Our very good friend Mitzu, former member of the Anchorage Cottages staff (as were we), came by to say hello.

I got to pet two more nice dogs, too.
Allan’s photo
We reached the end of the garden with time to spare.

Boreas Inn

I figured we would do some light weeding and deadheading and be home early.

looking east…I wish the daisies matched in vigor.

agastache

Imagine my horror when I walked around just to look at the entry garden and remembered that, when we had visited with Kilyn and Peter last Thursday, I had promised to trim the hardy fuchsia that had gotten beaten down by rain. Susie appeared and had lots of ideas about pruning other plants, as well, so my big plan to get home and start blogging about the Ocean Shores tour went out the window.

before
an hour later

We decided to have a reward dinner at

The Depot Restaurant.

gazpacho
house salad
Thai noodles
peach cobbler (Allan’s photo)

After dinner, we had another look at Jessica Schlief’s gorgeous new plantings at the Sou’wester Lodge.

This poppy!  I think it might be ‘Amazing Grey.’

It made me kind of sad that I had not taken on this job when I was offered it last year; I turned it down because the owner wanted mostly native plants!  Clearly, Jessica is planting what she loves, not just natives.  It would have been fun to make a garden at the Sou’wester again, because it was my first garden when I moved here.  However, I also don’t have time, and Jessica is a local gardener I greatly admire so I love seeing what she has done.

We got home as the sun was setting.

 

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Friday, 9 November 2018

the very last of the eight yards of mulch

Allan filling buckets while I went to unload yesterday’s Shelburne garden debris from the trailer

mulch all gone!

We were able to fill almost the full array of buckets with the last of the mulch pile and spent the day doing the first complete end of season clean up at

Diane’s garden.

parked in the Red Barn pasture next door….with this many buckets. (Allan’s photo)

Holly got so excited she dragged the chair a little bit after getting petted.

Allan’s photo

Our first mission was the roadside garden, where I cleared while Allan brought mulch from the trailer in the pasture next door—a long haul that required using the wheelbarrow to transport the buckets.  There is not enough room by the road to maneuver dumping a wheelbarrow full of loose mulch.

Just as I started, my friend Terran of BeeKissed Gardening pulled up in her distinctive honey-yellow truck (during a lull in traffic).  I was pleased to see one of my three favourite chefs was spending the day with her, Chef Jason.  And, of course, I was even more thrilled to see two of her dogs.

Allan’s photo

Terran is my top recommendation for gardening jobs.

I will apprise you when Chef Jason opens his new food truck in Astoria.  That will get me across the bridge for sure.

roadside garden before (Allan’s photo)

I hated to cut down that sanguisorba, but I did, because it would have been silly and floppy on its own.

starting to pull the cosmos

Even though I had told Diane last week that we’d be at her garden early this week, I was glad we had waited till Friday.  A frost had damaged the cosmos last night and so we were able to clear them all out instead of getting sentimental about them still looking ok.

The bad foliage of one of the leftover plants of the Agastache catastrophe was revealed.

It never had gotten better.

More Agastache thoughts: I was pressured, by the person who had sourced these plants, to see if they would just grow out of their disease.  I left one here in the roadside bed, being an isolated garden, just to see.  No, it did not grow out of it.  I was also chastised at the time when I discarded all the other diseased plants that throwing them out was like “having a cat put down without knowing what was wrong with it”.  The plant-sourcing person knew I had had to do that with my poor darling suffering best beloved Smoky, so that remark did not go over well with me.  In fact, looking back now….. [Redacted…This is one of many times in the Agastache Castastrophe and later that I wrote about my full feelings about what happened and decided to delete it!]

I never did get the plants tested.  During the peak of gardening season, I simply could not allow such ugly looking foliage to stay on view in public gardens.  (Some of it was even worse, with black patches on each leaf.)  Expert nursery friends assessed the plants as being bad and dangerous enough to other plants to require wheelie bin disposal.  (“And then throw out your gloves”, said one, and “remove every fallen leaf!” said another, and a third said, after viewing the leaves, “Don’t get that plant anywhere near me!”.) Another gardener had the best advice, to just move on and not spend any more time than necessary fixing the painful problem, which was a personal as well as a monetary loss.

Yet agastache remains one of my favourite perennials, so I will try again next year.  I have read that the Kudos series is highly resistant to disease, and all of those that I used this year have done beautifully.  The catastrophic ones were Acapulco Salmon and Pink, Cotton Candy, Estella Indigo, Golden Jubilee, and Sangria….some of my very favourites, unfortunately.  Only one batch of the above cultivars was bad; the ones I had gotten earlier in the year were pristine.

Today ended the bad episode, with the very last of the bad agastaches going into the wheelie bin.  The bigger showy ones often behave as annuals around here anyway, not coming through the winter.  I am glad to be at the other end of the saddest plant experience of my life!

starting to apply soil after clearing and clipping

A little bed by the front porch deck is one we have neglected.  I am hoping we can finally improve it next year.  It is full of valerian, which is just fine, but also has an awful lot of creeping buttercup and terrible soil.  We ran out of mulch for it.  Allan got the plants cut back.

before

after, ready for some bagged mulch later on

The equipment shown in the photo is part of the septic system and includes the septic alarm box that sounds if something goes wrong.

We turned our attention to the raised box garden in the back yard.

before

during

during

after

after mulching (Allan’s photos)

The center had been mostly cosmos, and three of the Agastache ‘Salmon and Pink’ that I do not trust, whose leaves still looked suspect, so we treated them as annuals also and discarded them (no composting for them!).

We finished up the mulching of the roadside garden with four bags of a product that Diane had bought for it during the summer.

I am glad it was brown and not red bark!

not a big fan of bark, me…

Allan found a frog living behind the bark bags, along with a worm and a slug.

With the bark spread, it did look sort of reddish…

Allan’s photo

Most people see this garden at 20 miles per hour.

after

Almost all of Diane’s summer garden got loaded into our trailer to go home to our compost bins:

One more wheelbarrow load was added after this.

Diane’s garden now gets erased from the fall clean up list, and added to a new list on the workboard called “Post frost check-up”, which will be the final clean up of annuals either after a hard frost or in mid December, whichever comes first.

Helichrysum ‘Limelight’ climbing into a barberry, according to plan.

The Red Barn

We had an hour before dark to weed the narrow bed at the Red Barn.  It is not quite ready yet to erase from the fall clean up list.

Lots of sorrel weed appeared after we pulled the old California poppy foliage.

not quite done….but running out of daylight.

I don’t like using horse manure; it is too weedy.  However, I’ve decided we will add some to this gravelly garden bed when we return to finish the clean up job.  It needs something, and the Red Barn has a great big pile of horse manure always at the ready.

sunset over the Red Barn

At home, we unloaded the compressed trailer load of debris onto a tarp till I have time to enter it into the compost bin three.  Mulch week is over, with eight yards of soil moved in about 20 hours of very hard work.  The last two days, I was running on Doans Back Pills.  Yesterday, I frequently had to stand with my back against a wall to just straighten up.  The wall at the post office was especially good because it was warm from the sun.  I heard some pained noises from Allan, too, as the week wore on.

I hope to revive by staycation time and order eight yards of mulch for my own garden.

We now are entering serious fall clean up mode and hope to plug on through it without a day off until it is done or until rain comes, whichever is first.  Then: staycation preview till the first hard frost.

 

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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

I got very little sleep because of worrying that we were both going to get sick.  With the clam festival coming up, we had much to do in Long Beach town.  There is no back up plan if we can’t do it; all of our other working gardener friends are even busier than we are.

Little dramas loom large when one is self employed.

Allan felt poorly in the morning with sniffles and a cough, and yet with the good weather, we did go to work.  It is maddening; we were so good about disinfecting our hands every time we went somewhere public, and yet…the germs got him.

If only we could have followed Skooter’s example:

Skooter

(Skooter has a chin condition, a problem common with orange cats, says the vet.  My orange cat of years ago, Valene, had the same thing.)

On the way, we dropped off a book at the library (housed in the Ilwaco Community Building).

at the Ilwaco Community Building

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ at the community building

The community building garden needs a bit of weeding…(not shown in the photos above).

In case I end up having to go to work on the bus later this week, we went to the two least-accessible-by-bus jobs first.

The Red Barn

Because I am thinking of using a different plant for the centerpiece of the Ilwaco planters, Allan pointed out how good the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ looks at the Red Barn.  They get less wind here.

My very good friend Rosie was at the barn.

Diane’s garden

My very good old friend Misty greeted us next door at Diane’s garden.

snoozing

till the camera clicked

The septic box bulb display pleased me; we had missed some of it, of course.  After deadheading:

Muscari ‘Bling Bling’

Muscari paradoxum

I was pleased to find sweet peas just emerging along the picket fence.

The corner driveway garden needs mulching; soon, I hope. I asked Allan to take this photo, and did not get what I wanted, which is the fact that the Stipa gigantea grass is already showing flower spikes.  Oops, I should have specified.

Long Beach

Long Beach had been on the schedule for all day this coming Thursday, to get the parks and planters perfect for the Razor Clam Festival.  I was fretting about what would happen if we both got sick and could not work then.  So we did a lot of it today, which led to more fretting on my part that I was going to make Allan sicker by having him work.  I brooded about how I recently delayed one day taking Calvin to the vet, prioritizing work instead because he seemed not especially sick, and then…we know how that turned out.

We went down the six downtown blocks of street trees and planters, deadheading.  I felt reassured each time I saw Allan taking a photo, figuring it must mean he did not feel too terrible.  (He said, “It’s easier than working!”)

Allan’s planter and tree garden photos:

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ and Tulip ‘Silverstream’ and Tulip sylvestris

Geum ‘Mango Lassi’ and muscari

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in street tree garden (with tulip)

Tulip ‘China Town’ and Fritillaria meleagris

Tulip ‘Princess Irene’

AKA ‘Prinses Irene’

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

Van Engelen catalog says: A magical sport of Jewel of Spring, fragrant Silverstream ranges from creamy-yellow to deep yellow with red feathering, to red with every combination in between. But the surprise garden party doesn’t stop there: it has showy, attractive foliage with silver-white margins. (Did you know that the phenomena of marginated foliage occurs due to a lack of or insufficient pigmentation and chlorophyll in the plant cells on the outer petal edges?)

I did not think to smell the tulips nor did I notice white margins on the foliage.

street tree garden

Tulips ‘Green Wave’ and ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

lower left: a tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ that went mushy with rain

My planter and tree garden photos:

Tulips that had been broken, and not by the wind.

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

As you can tell by now, I planted a big run of Silverstream through town.  I think they are too tall to choose again.  And the color variation is nice but it does not thrill me.

one of the viridiflora (green) tulips…too tired to look it up

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’ in one of the windiest planters. Short and strong.

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’…would that all tulips were this tough

more Silverstream

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ and Tulip acuminata

Tulips ‘Sensual Touch’ and ‘Black Hero’

Tulips ‘Green Star’, sylvestris, acuminata

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulips ‘Prinses Irene’, ‘Sensual Touch’, ‘Black Hero’

We also weeded in Fifth Street Park because…Razor Clam Festival!  Fifth Street Park needs so much more attention, and I hope we can do more later this week.  So much horsetail, so much wild garlic.  (No photos there.)

We went on to Veterans Field, which will be the central place for the clam festival.  It is not ideal to deadhead and weed four days before the festival, but needs must.

Veterans Field flag pavilion garden

The last time we were in Long Beach, Allan asked where the blue was in that arc garden.  I said the grape hyacinth along the edge.  Well, now look at what a string trimmer did:

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’ as was

And right before the festival, when we were trying to make it perfect despite feeling poorly.  I wanted to lie down on the lawn and blub, but it would be too hard to get back up again.  Some white narcissi were also casualties along the edge.  Then I thought…Ok, maybe this is a sign that I do not have to struggle so hard and fret so darn much about making it perfect.  Maybe I can stop worrying about whether we will be able to get back to deadhead on Thursday.

Still….dang blang it!

On the way south, we deadheaded the welcome sign.

And finally, we paused at the

Shelburne Hotel

where I planted 9 more violas and two Agastache ‘Apricot Sunrise’.  I would like to have weeded more, but we had already worked four hours longer than I had originally planned and Allan was not feeling any better.  The question is, was it wiser to work today so that we can take a day off? Or did it make everything worse?  It would have been so bad if we had stayed home today and then both got sick and couldn’t do a thing before the weekend.  It would be even worse if we got even sicker.  Such woes of self employment have plagued me for the last 42 years.

three by the fig tree, the rest in front

If the gardens in Long Beach are not perfect when you attend clam festival, you now know why.  We forgot to stop at First Place Mall on the way south and deadhead the one dead narcissus that I noticed in the planter there.  I will try not to lose sleep over it.

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Friday, 15 December 2017

When we’d learned there was to be a rally against ICE deportations in the afternoon, interfering with my at-home goals, I had decided that we should try to polish off some of the leftover work beforehand.

We began at the Ilwaco boatyard garden, planting about six good sized starts of Solidago ‘Fireworks’ in empty spaces along the two block long garden.

boatyard garden looking south

planting

The last of the old cosmos got pulled, and I am calling this garden done for 2017.

crab pot tree at the end of the garden (Allan’s photo)

In Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park, I planted two clumps of the solidago (a short and well behaved clumping goldenrod) while Allan snipped a few stray brown stems from nearby planters.

Fifth Street Park

Narcissi already blooming in Fifth Street Park

We cruised up to the Anchorage Cottages, thinking we could finally clip back the chrysanthemums and agyranthemums.  Our summery weather had them still blooming, so we did not even get out of the van, just turned around and left.

At The Red Barn Arena, we planted a couple of pieces of the goldenrod and pulled out one dead erysimum.

a wee bit of weeding

Midge in her fine coat.

Next door at Diane’s garden, the remaining annuals still looked too lush to pull.  I left a note suggesting she just cut back anything in those pots that looks tatty later.  I can’t keep going back to check on them every week; that is not cost effective for either of us.

the annuals that will not die

I look forward to many bulbs in this raised septic garden.

We now had an hour and a half left before the rally, with no more work to do.  This called for a stop at NIVA green.

In NIVA green, with Heather’s assistant, Wes, and Heather Ramsay herself

a peek through the doorway into the magic workshop (Allan’s photo)

Heather had put out some new lamps:

I fell hard for this double decker nightlight and got it for myself, even though buying presents for myself was not on the agenda.

This red truck is going to go beautifully with a “Card Lady’ card of a red truck with a Christmas tree in the back.

After NIVA, we spent 40 minutes relaxing at Abbracci Coffee Bar.  I am quite annoyed that the bright summer-like sun blurred out my focus on the Christmas tree in their window.  Trust me, it was such a pretty sight.  Let’s say it is like a water colour.

an elegant pattern on my latte

Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery is retiring her business to become a personal chef for an artists’ retreat.   Abbracci will be the only local place to get her baked goods, like this delicately flavoured Swedish Traveling Cake.  Elixir Coffee up in South Bend will also have her treats.

Abbracci art (Allan’s photo)

In Abbracci, I had such a helpful conversation with owners Tony and Bernardo and one of their patrons. I was asked (not in these exact words) about the severe clean up of the narrow garden to the south of their building: Would the plants come back? I had dug up lots of volunteer blue scabiosa and other perennials in an attempt to start over. I told them that I try to rein in my “messy gardening style” and was thinking of a much tidier planting there. Turns out all three of them love the wild and tangly style. It made the happy to hear that I could so easily make that garden bed messy again.

Finally, it was time for the rally.  This time, the organizer had decided to split the event between Long Beach and Ocean Park.  I had kvetched about it making the groups too small, and indeed, the rally began with only three of us.  For new readers, here is the background again:

“[Long Beach Peninsula Resident] Rosas was arrested when going to Okie’s early in the morning of November 27. When he asked why he was being arrested, ICE officers said “My supervisor asked me to come find you because of what appeared in the newspaper.” We want to speak out against this arrest and on the attack on his rights to free speech.

The original story in the Seattle Times (my home town paper) is here, and well worth reading.

The follow up, after the arrest of Rosas, is here.

He appears to have been sought out because he spoke (under his nickname) to the Seattle Times.  ICE did not detain him earlier, even though he asked them why they took his family and not him.

This story has drawn the attention of the Mexican consulate and has been picked up by national and international news, including the Washington Post and The Independent, UK.

Here is a link to the gofundme where you can contribute, to help him and his family, who were deported to Mexico.  (His children are American citizens, who went with their mother.)

Today, when we first arrived, we thought there was no one else, and we waited in our van for a bit.  Then we saw one lone figure arrive; it was Ann, who had also been waiting in her vehicle.

Allan’s photo

We settled into our rallying as the wind picked up and the rain arrived.  Allan took all the rally photos but one.  My hands were so cold that I didn’t even think of getting out the camera.

Only once were we heckled with a “WOOO Trump!” from a young fellow driving a foreign made car; the rest of the interaction from passing vehicles was all waves and honks and thumbs up.

Everyne at the Ocean Park rally point bailed out when the rain came.  I was not about to stop for rain; I know darn well that Rosas himself worked on the bay in all sorts of weather.

MaryBeth saw my one real-time photo on Facebook and came to join us.  Four felt much more effective to me than three.

The rain finally stopped and out came a rainbow behind us.

Our good friend Susie was just at that moment returning from an out of town trip, too late to join us..

our Susie

We endured till 4:15 PM.

Allan and I could see a glorious pink sky and so we drove to the west end of Sid Snyder drive for a better look.

looking west

Allan’s photo, to the south

We nabbed a few Christmas lights photos on the way home.

Ilwaco City Hall

Ocean Beach Hospital, Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

Ocean Beach Hospital (Allan’s photo)

Crab pots on First Avenue

We had a mere 45 minutes turn around time at home.  I was able to erase Diane’s garden and the Red Barn from the work board.  The other jobs are simply going to have to wait until we have a hard frost for their final check up…if we have such a thing this winter.

We soon left again for our weekly North Beach Garden Gang dinner at OleBob’s Café at the Port.

on the way: The Crab Pot Tree

The four us us (Tangly Cottage Gardening and Sea Star Gardening) were joined this week by our good friend Ed of Strange Landscaping.

In the entry hallway: Pins show where visitors have come from.

a local sea captain

This week’s specials:

a beef empanada

the view

south window reflection shows the inside, the outdoor dining deck, and the Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Co Christmas star

Dave, Ed, Allan, Melissa, with Lynn and Chef Laura in the background

Paella was another special of the night.

Allan’s fresh caught rockfish with Laura’s chimichurri sauce and a “perfectly done” baked potato

flan for dessert

We stayed till after closing, when I was so happy to sit with Laura’s dog, Pancho.

I so much want a nice little dog.  Pancho is such a good boy.

I suddenly felt ever so exhausted.  Yet tomorrow is another busy, not at-home day.

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Wednesday, 9 December 2015

the view while we were getting ready

the view while we were getting ready…a torrential squall

After that downpour, the day cleared up and turned into excellent weather for the (almost) last work day of the season.  The almost refers to one more job that Allan has, mulching the library garden.

Mike’s garden

We had a few clumps of mixed white narcissi and Narcissi ‘Angel Eyes’ to plant at Mayor Mike’s, just down the street.

Mike's front path

Mike’s front path

a low sprawling conifer with white tips

a low sprawling conifer with white tips

Ilwaco Post Office

More bulbs went into the Ilwaco Post Office garden.

More bulbs went into the Ilwaco Post Office garden.  Crocus tommies, iris reticulate, Narcissus ‘Angel Eyes’, Tulip ‘Flaming Spring Green’, Brodiaea ‘Silver Queen’

DSC02871

post office window

post office window

The Red Barn

I had a bill to drop off at the Red Barn.  Again, the fields were boggy from rain.

DSC00704

Allan’s photo

the narrow garden (Allan's photo)

the narrow garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

horses in the field next door where we usually park to work at Diane's

horses in the field where we usually park to work at Diane’s

Diane’s garden

Other than a small amount of clipping back potted annuals, our mission at Diane’s was to deliver a pot of Stargazer lilies, ordered at her request.

Misty gets pets.

Misty gets a good scritching.

DSC02873

my good friend Misty

my good friend Misty

one pot of Stargazers added to the mix

one pot of Stargazers added to the mix

DSC02877

hydrangea at the corner of the house, will be our first task on a late winter visit

street view with Stipa gigantea

street view with Stipa gigantea

Long Beach

At last it was time to do the final clean up of the Long Beach welcome sign.

A few remaining yellow flowers could not save the bidens along the edge.

A few remaining yellow flowers could not save the bidens along the edge.

a ridiculously early anemone

a ridiculously early anemone

sweeping up

sweeping up

I had mercy on a very few last flowers of the echibeckia.

I had mercy on a very few last flowers of the echibeckia.

We planted lots of little crocus tommasianus and iris reticulata in the Long Beach main street planters and three on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

poppy seeds sprouting in a planter I had strewn with poppy tops

poppy seeds sprouting in a planter I had strewn with poppy tops

Allan's photo: poppy seedhead

Allan’s photo: poppy seedhead

And we cut down some more plants, including chrysanthemums…

Allan's photo, before

Allan’s photo, before cutting these down, because we won’t be back to do it later..

but not these, that are about to bloom still

but we did not cut these, that are about to bloom still

and that little dwarf chrysanthemum is blooming!

and that little dwarf chrysanthemum is blooming!

Long Beach City Hall got some Narcissi ‘Angel Eyes’ in the garden bed that is a memorial to Peggy Miles; she and her spouse, Gene, planted the garden on the east side of city hall about a year before she died.

Inside city hall (Allan's photo)

Inside city hall (Allan’s photo)

The photo above shows a glimpse of a city crewman and City Manager Dave discussing the unpleasant fact that a city water main broke today, a BIG one, and although the crew got it fixed, a boil water advisory is now on for Long Beach and Seaview at least until at least Friday morning.

Inside city hall (Allan's photo)

Inside city hall (Allan’s photo)

Inside city hall (Allan's photo)

Inside city hall (Allan’s photo)

Inside city hall (Allan's photo)

Inside city hall (Allan’s photo)

stocking hung with care for city works (Allan's photo)

stocking hung with care for city workers (Allan’s photo)

The Anchorage Cottages

The very last of the mixed white and ‘Angel Eyes’ narcissi went into the entry garden at the Anchorage, where the buddliea got a trim.

before

before

after

after

Melianthus major still standing

Melianthus major still standing

I’ll send the following photo to manager Beth with the message that she can have someone take the calla lilies to the ground if a frost blackens them or turns them limp, and the same goes for the Melianthus.

Our work season is done and these still remain.

Our work season is done and these callas still remain.

working till dusk

working till dusk

The only clump of callas that did look mushy...

The only clump of callas that did look mushy…

and did get taken down.

and did get taken down.

Next door to the Anchorage: bear traps ready to be deployed as needed.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

In the almost dark, we stopped on the way home and did a last bit of clipping at The Depot Restaurant, which was closed because of the boil water advisory.

Ilwaco

We did the rounds of the flatlands to get some more holiday photos for the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.

CoHo Charters (Allan's photo)

CoHo Charters (Allan’s photo)

Santa's outhouse (!!), Allan's photo

Santa’s outhouse (!!), Allan’s photo

Englund Marine (Allan's photo)

Englund Marine (Allan’s photo)

Griffin Gallery (Allan's photo)

Griffin Gallery (Allan’s photo)

Griffin Gallery (with a bucket to catch a leak)

Griffin Gallery (with a bucket because of a leaky window)

Doupé Building (Allan's photo)

Doupé Building (Allan’s photo)

an extravaganza on Spruce Street

an extravaganza on Spruce Street

At home, I looked at all we had accomplished on the work board…

DSC02946

And was able to erase all but that one mulching job…

DSC02948

And because the mulching job can be accomplished any time between now and February, I think I will now declare that staycation has officially begun.  Although there will be some off-season non-publishing days on the blog, I do have a few slide shows set up to keep things ticking along for awhile.

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 30 September 2015

On our way to work, we watered the Ilwaco Post Office planter, and I noticed to my dismay that the deer have discovered it.

Deer have nibbled the nasturtiums; this bodes ill for our post office garden.

Deer have nibbled the nasturtiums; this bodes ill for our post office garden.

The Planter Box

We stopped at The Planter Box on our way north to pick up a few plants for a container at the Anchorage.

We stopped at The Planter Box on our way north to pick up a few plants for a container at the Anchorage.

Allan's photo: They have pumpkins!

Allan’s photo: They have pumpkins!

After our second tour of the Oysterville garden, we put in a half day of weeding and grooming several gardens.

Marilyn’s Garden

looking southwest from the driveway

looking southwest from the driveway

looking northwest from the back porch steps

looking northwest from the back porch steps

Removing this clump of volunteer montbretia must go on the list of fall projects!

Removing this clump of volunteer montbretia must go on the list of fall projects!

look how the big floppy zebra grass has a tidy clump coming up in the middle.

look how the big floppy zebra grass has a tidy clump coming up in the middle.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Bella in the A Frame garden

Bella in the A Frame garden

inside the A Frame

inside the A Frame (one of the vacation rentals)

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Mary of KBC

Mary of KBC

Managers Denny and Mary do everything from lawn care to cleaning to welcoming guests and doing the paperwork.  They own one of the cottages and their own home on the resort property.

Sarah

Sarah

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Bella

Bella

oh, and the garden!

oh, and the garden!

The big birds (spruce grouse?) were there; Allan just managed to get this rear view.

The big birds (spruce grouse?) were there; Allan just managed to get this rear view.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

my mom's coppery rose

my mom’s coppery rose

sweet peas and my mom's old window; wish she could see them

sweet peas and my mom’s old window; wish she could see them

more sweet peas

more sweet peas

Anchorage Cottages

Allan weeded under the grape arbour.

Allan weeded under the grape arbour.

autumnal grape leaves (Allan's photo)

autumnal grape leaves (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Mitzu felt unusually camera shy.

Mitzu felt unusually camera shy.  Dogs and cats have moods, too, you know.

on Beth's lap

on Beth’s lap

plants from The Planter Box

new plants from The Planter Box went into this pot

the office courtyard

the office courtyard

watering Ilwaco

Watering season is still not over, so Allan took the water trailer on the Ilwaco rounds.

at the boatyard to fill the tank for watering

at the boatyard to fill the tank for watering

He found the volunteer fire department having a drill while he filled the trailer at the boatyard.

He found the volunteer fire department having a drill while he filled the trailer at the boatyard.

boatyard and fire fighters

boatyard and fire fighters

By the time he checked on the Time Enough Books boat, darkness was falling.

By the time he checked on the Time Enough Books boat, darkness was falling.

Meanwhile, I was at home doing the monthly billing and anticipating writing this blog post and reliving of walking through the Oysterville garden today.

Thursday, 1 October 2015

We finished our great big two day work week with a three small jobs and then Long Beach.

The very first sign of Halloween on Lake Street, by the Post Office

The very first sign of Halloween on Lake Street, by the Post Office

Halloween is a very big deal on Spruce and Lake Streets in Ilwaco, and we are beginning to collect our materials for our Corridor of Spooky Plants.

The Red Barn

Allan's photo: our small and narrow Red Barn garden

Allan’s photo: our small and narrow Red Barn garden

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I decided it was time for the fennel to go away. (Allan's photo)

I decided it was time for the fennel to go away. (Allan’s photo)

Poor bronze fennel, once so prized, and recommended by influential gardeners in slide shows at garden seminars, and now on the noxious weed list.

Bronze Fennel looking glorious in a garden

Bronze Fennel looking glorious in a garden

bronze fennel....now called by some a noxious weed

bronze fennel….now called by some a noxious weed

And it is gone! (Allan's photo)

And it is gone! (Allan’s photo).  The tall stems will go in our Corridor of Spooky Plants for Halloween.

The yellow violas died in this container, and reseeded

The yellow violas died in this container, and reseeded themselves.

Diane’s garden

My good friend Misty came out to meet us even before we got next door to Diane and Larry’s garden.

My Misty

My Misty

I love her.

I love her.

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Such a good girl.

blueberry autumn colour

blueberry autumn colour

The roadside garden

The roadside garden

The pink heather that was Diane’s inspiration for having us make this roadside bed is already going over, which is why I did not want to make it the only plant here.

It only looks perfectly pink for a couple of weeks.

It only looks perfectly pink for a couple of weeks.

I enjoy when we drive by this garden, and I hope others do, as well.

I enjoy when we drive by this garden, and I hope others do, as well.

The Depot Restaurant

If we deadheaded every old cosmos flower, we’d be here for an hour!

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flower garden on north side of dining deck

Long Beach

Allan deadheading what's left of the welcome sign flowers (after it got trampled during Rod Run)

Allan deadheading what’s left of the welcome sign flowers (after it got trampled during Rod Run)

We'd have lots more deadheading to do if the cosmos had not been destroyed.

We’d have lots more deadheading to do if most of the cosmos had not been destroyed!

Cosmos 'Happy Ring'

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’

We took two jugs of water for the newly planted Sid Snyder beach approach planters, as the water is turned off there.

new plants, nurtured

new plants, nurtured

The plaque goes back to volunteer days.

The plaque goes back to volunteer days from years ago.

My darling little hens and chickens have already been stolen from the planter above.  That is IT, I will nevermore plant hens and chickens sedums in any of the Ilwaco planters.  They got stolen here, and on the Bolstad approach, and in Fish Alley.  As Allan says, someone probably has a nice collection of hens and chicks on their windowsill.  I picture the same person prowling and thinking “Ooh, has she planted any more?  YES, a new kind for my collection!”  Feh.  It is frustrating because they would be so perfect in all the beach approach planters that are hard to water.

Because watering season is not over after all, we watered all the main street planters and street trees.

lavender at Fifth Street

lavender at Fifth Street

the carousel dismantled, sure sign of end of summer

the carousel being dismantled, sure sign of end of tourist season

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

My friend Tam at the Herb "n Legend Smoke Shop

My friend Tam at the Herb “n Legend Smoke Shop

reseeded lavenders and a determined little fern

reseeded lavenders and a determined little fern

more painted sage

more painted sage

Salvia patens at 7th Street

Salvia patens at 7th Street

Salvia patens

Salvia patens

Geranium 'Rozanne' (Allan's photo)

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (Allan’s photo)

Gunnera by the pond in Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

Gunnera by the pond in Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

We also had time to pull Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ at four locations, or rather, Allan did, while I worked the Veterans Field garden deadheading….

tree by Anchor Realty, before

tree by Anchor Realty, before

and after

and after

tree by Cottage Bakery before (Allan's photo)

tree by Cottage Bakery, before

and after

and after

planter by Wind World Kites, before

planter by Wind World Kites, before

This is the only planter where we have let a large amount of ‘Lucifer’ stay.  The owner of Wind World Kites likes it very much.  Most shopkeepers prefer to not have something so tall in front of their shop.

Wind World Kites, after

Wind World Kites, after

Veterans Field corner garden

Veterans Field corner garden

We had time before dinner to pull more Crocosmia at City Hall, in an area along the west wall planted by former city administrator Gene Miles.  I found some weeding to do because when I pull crocosmia I feel like the top of my head is going to fly off.  (Yes, that’s weird, but true.)

City Hall, north side

City Hall, north side

before

west side, before (Allan’s photo)

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and after (Allan’s photo)

The Cove Restaurant

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Todd joined Melissa, Dave, Allan and I making up a good meeting of the North Beach Garden Gang.

Chef Jason Lancaster

Chef Jason Lancaster

Todd shared fascinating stories about all the local places where he had taken visiting friends.

Two friends from Plant Delights nursery, where Todd used to be the curator of the display garden, had been to visit for a week.  They had eaten clams and mushrooms which the three of them harvested, and visited old growth trees by Teal Slough:

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo

And the north Oregon coast:

Todd's photo: Ecola State Park north of Cannon Beach

Todd’s photo: Ecola State Park north of Cannon Beach

We caught up with Melissa and Dave (Sea Star Gardening) on news about the work week.

As was Melissa.

I also found Melissa’s stories fascinating.

delicious apple blue cheese salad and apple cider

delicious apple blue cheese salad and Arnold Palmer to drink.  (Allan’s photo)

apple blue cheese salad

apple blue cheese salad

And it was good. (Allan's photo)

And it was good. (Allan’s photo)

Cove Stir Fry (Allan's photo)

Cove Stir Fry (Allan’s photo)

Dave, Todd, and I had the Cajun chicken alfredo. (Allan's photo)

Dave, Todd, and I had the Cajun chicken alfredo. (Allan’s photo)

Melissa had the bronzed scallops.

Melissa had the bronzed scallops.

Melissa and me (Allan's photo)

Melissa and me (Allan’s photo)

Allan and I are now set for another self indulgent five days off!  We’re hoping for good evening weather on Saturday so that we can have a campfire dinner with Melissa, Dave, and Our Kathleen, and of course I am hoping to not leave my property for the entire five days.

 

 

 

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Monday, 18 May 2015

Diane’s garden

We loaded up with lots of annuals in pinks and pastels for Diane’s garden.

After arriving there, while sorting and burbling all the plants, I found a hitchhiker in a pot hidden under foliage.

We put him in an empty jar.

We put him in an empty jar.


lots of containers all planted up in the back yard

lots of containers all planted up in the back yard


my good friend Misty

my good friend Misty


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I am reminded by the above photo that I had a headache all day, thus the cold, wet headband was worn.

Misty's smile

Misty’s smile (Allan’s photo)


Diane is a champion barrel racer.

Diane is a champion barrel racer; this tile reflects her love of horses.


a bright pink agyranthemum for Diane

a bright pink agyranthemum for Diane


Meanwhile, Allan planted cosmos in the roadside strip...

Meanwhile, Allan planted cosmos in the roadside strip…


after

after


Nepeta and a pale pink allium

Nepeta and a pale pink allium


allium, catmint, and bee

allium, catmint, and bee


I made room to plant some cosmos in front of the Stipa gigantea.

I made room to plant some cosmos in front of the Stipa gigantea.


Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass


a fragrant apricot coloured azalea against the house

a fragrant apricot coloured azalea against the house


back container garden all planted up

back container garden all planted up

Basket Case Greenhouse

with yellow aquilegia (columbine)

with yellow aquilegia (columbine)

Allan released the little hitchhiker frog in the greenhouse.

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Later, when we got home, we found another frog in the van, so we hope they were not best friends traveling together.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Basket Case staff members (Allan's photo)

Basket Case staff members (Allan’s photo)

The Red Barn Arena

At the Red Barn, we had twelve yellow calibrachoas to add to the four whiskey barrels.

Then I briefly visited Hugo.

Then I briefly visited Hugo.

Long Beach

Next, we did some more Long Beach work, weeding and planting cosmos in Fifth Street Park and adding a few more plants to the planters.

Brodiaea in Fifth Street Park...I love the little flowers, but the foliage is always a mess before the flowers bloom.  Here, I have pulled some foliage off sideways.

Brodiaea in Fifth Street Park…I love the little flowers, but the foliage is always a mess before the flowers bloom. Here, I have pulled some foliage off sideways, trying to preserve the flower buds.


planter by Fifth Street park with a perennial veronica

planter by Fifth Street park with a perennial veronica and columbine


This bicycle parking job mightily displeased us.

This bicycle parking job mightily displeased us.


Fifth Street Park after weeding and planting

Fifth Street Park after weeding and planting


roses by Funland

roses by Funland


Veterans Field Flag Plaza: a somewhat windy day

Veterans Field Flag Plaza: a somewhat windy day

We cleaned up under a tree by Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop.  Now, you may wonder how this is different from the tree garden being flattened in Ilwaco that I wept about in yesterday’s post.  The difference is we know what we are doing, and we did not decimate any good plants.  The golden lemon balm which was smothered by a wild sedge grass will now have room to regrow.

before (Allan's photo); I had noticed a big sedge in here last week.

before (Allan’s photo); I had noticed a big sedge in here last week.


after (Allan's photo); also removed the old floppy schizostylis leaves

after (Allan’s photo); also removed the old floppy schizostylis leaves


In the shop, Zoltar kept offering to tell our fortune.

In the shop, Zoltar kept offering to tell our fortune.


Basket Case baskets are up at City Hall.

Basket Case baskets are up at City Hall.

The Depot Restaurant

We had acquired two Miscanthus strictus, a tall zebra grass, at the Basket Case, so on the way south Allan added it to the east side deck garden at the Depot Restaurant.

planting

planting at the Depot


after (Allan's photo)

after (with limited seating available to watch the garden grow)

Ilwaco

Our last task was to replace a few more old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in the Ilwaco planters.

old and leggy

old and leggy


an Erysimum in flower

a healthy Erysimum in flower

We bucket watered two blocks worth of planters with our leftover bucket water from the day’s planting.  As I rounded the corner onto Spruce, I was thrilled to see our friend Jenna (Queen La De Da) watering; turns out she waters the planter in front of her shop and also the one across the street.

Bless her everloving heart!

Bless her everloving heart!  (I wish there really were an English Pub there; it has been closed for years.)

At home, I appreciated a few things in my own garden before going inside….

Rose 'Gloire de Dijon'

Rose ‘Gloire de Dijon’


the back garden, with Mary

the back garden, with Mary


back garden, west bed

back garden, west bed (also with Mary)


back garden, east bed

back garden, east bed


back garden, center bed

back garden, center bed

The second little frog that had hitchhiked with us today got released back by the water boxes on the patio.

I hope he doesn't miss his friend.  (Allan's photo)

I hope he doesn’t miss his friend. (Allan’s photo)


the work board today

the work board today

The work board had a couple of items simply eliminated:  I decided not to plant any cosmos in Mike’s garden, in order to make it easier maintenance, and I had observed that the Depot rhododendron does NOT need pruning in order for the painters to get behind it.  I added the planting of painted sage, when the second batch at the Planter Box is ready.  Carter and The Red Barn remain on the planting list because each will get a few more annuals.  I suppose Long Beach should still be on it for the same reason…and yet I somehow feel that Long Beach qualifies as done, as any annuals left to plant will be popped in to fill gaps  the first time we do the big planter watering there.

 

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