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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘Akebono’’

Friday, 12 April 2019

Long Beach

We checked on the Long Beach welcome sign, where the vole damage does not seem to have increased at all, thank goodness.

I did not examine the tulips closely.  Ignorance is bliss.

We deadheaded two blocks worth of planters downtown.

I don’t think I have grown Tulip ‘Suncatcher’ before.

Suncatcher…very showy.

Allan’s photo

The tulips and the tulip foliage look great despite all the rain.

in front of Stormin’ Norman’s

We then took last time’s debris to city works and picked up a buckets-load of Soil Energy mulch.

Allan’s photo

And then, out to the beach approach to see how far we could get with the mulch on the sections we had already weeded.

We barely had enough for the first (westernmost) long section, the longest of all of them.  Then, on to weeding, hoping to get at least one half section done.

a thorny job

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo (telephoto; we were far from that close to the background hotel)

This week is spring break so the town is full of happy tourists.

Rain came, steaming on the road.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We only got one half section done…

Allan’s photo

…and we still have this far to go.

Vehicle above is on the wrong side of the road to politely avoid us, unlike many who cut it very fine as they pass us, despite our traffic cones and Allan’s safety vest.

We dumped today’s debris and finished deadheading the other four blocks of downtown planters.

Tulip ‘Akebono’ is one of my favourites.

I love Akebono’s green sepals and delicate, thin red edge (which does not seem as visible on these).

Allan’s camera picked up the red edge, on the yellow, behind the red tulip.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

I am partial to all the viridiflora tulips.

‘Akebono’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

😦 Allan’s photo

more Green Star (Allan’s photo)

I’m thrilled to see buds on my asphodeline.

I was not thrilled to find evidence of finger blight by Fifth Street Park.

Some flowers were just picked and dropped; perhaps someone yelled at the thief?

broken, not clipped with secateurs

And some were downright taken.  There should be five or six orange tulips in each of these clumps.

The ones across the street were as they should be.

The weather had become pleasant again after the rain and wind that drove us off the beach approach, and so we did a big tidy up of the northwest quadrant of Fifth Street Park.

our audience (Allan’s photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

There was way too much Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, hesperantha, and the ever maddening horsetail (the little scrimmy one) and some kind of belligerently spreading skinny allium.

after (Allan’s photo)

after

I might use some kind of annual along the front, so that it can be cleaned more easily of weeds in the autumn and winter.

Unfortunately, we had much more to do so no time to have a late lunch at Captain Bob’s Chowder.

camassia in the southwest quadrant

We deadheaded the last two blocks….

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

…and the Sid Snyder beach approach planters, where we saw two darling dogs…

…and a remarkably cute goat.

We deadheaded at the Kite Museum and almost got stuck dumping our debris at City Works.

Allan’s photo

Shelburne Hotel

While Allan did our grocery shopping across the street, I deadheaded at the Shelburne and noted an influx of weeds, mostly sorrel and creeping buttercup, that must be dealt with by next weekend.  I resolved that the next nice day would be partly spent there.

hmmmmm….what happened here?

I put down Sluggo all along the fence where I had planted sweet peas.  I could see a few of them, tiny and threadlike, emerging.

looking north

looking south

Looking south from the north end….In the distance, walking away, is Seaview Sara’s spouse and their dog, Jet; I had finally met the lovely dog for the first time.

Tulip ‘Akebono’ again

only one tiny hint of the red edge

Tulip ‘Spring Green’

Tulip ‘Queensland’

Tulip sylvestris

I had finally learned, from Monty Don on Gardeners’ World, that T. sylvestris is fragrant.  I rarely think to smell a tulip.  I did, and it has a beautiful scent.

not sure which one this is!

The work board has gotten ever so slightly shorter.

 

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Thursday, 20 April 2017

Pouring rain almost put an end to the idea of work.

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We’d had this much rain overnight.

And then it stopped by midmorning.

I scheduled an easy day, which included a visit to THE Oysterville garden.  That self -guided tour will be our next post.

At home before work

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Azara microphylla ‘Variegata’ and Skooter (Allan’s photo)

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Erythronium (dog tooth violet)

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Allan digging a Tetrapanax sprout, too close to the maple

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Acer campestre ‘Carnival’

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Acer campestre ‘Carnival, acquired from Dancing Oaks last year

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Our post office garden looks unexciting so far.  I planted some bachelor button seeds.

The Depot Restaurant

I planted the wee sprout of tetrapanax in the garden on the south side of the dining deck…my second attempt to get one started there. Light weeding and deadheading ensued.

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north side of deck

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Tulip ‘Akebono’ (Allan’s photo)

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the barrel by the east window

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Tulip ‘Virichic’

Long Beach

A stop at city hall to pick up our cheque led to some deadheading and weeding.

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the ramp garden

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north side: pulmonaria still blooming

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north side

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signs of finger blight

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city hall west side

Basket Case Greenhouse

I’m collecting plants for the upcoming Planting Time, so far just perennials.  I consider it too early for annuals, and yet, as always, I am concerned that folks who plant (too) early will get all the good stuff before I’m ready for annuals (round about Mother’s Day).

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Darrel waters the many tempting plants in the annuals house.

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Me and Roxanne with Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and some Erysumum ‘Bowles Mauve’

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Buddy behind the desk

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YOU, yes you (those who live here), should snap these callistemon.  It’s rare to see them for sale on the Peninsula!

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heucheras

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and more heucheras

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Buddy woke up.

We left the Basket Case and took ourselves to Oysterville to tour its premier garden, one of the top two gardens on the Peninsula (the other being Steve and John’s bayside garden).  If there are better gardens here, I have not seen them. That will be tomorrow’s post.

Driving south from Oysterville, we saw Todd gardening at a Nahcotta bed and breakfast.

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in front of the Charles Nelson Guest House

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Todd Wiegardt at work

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Allan’s photo

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We spent a pleasant two hours at Klipsan Beach Cottages. In a preview of Planting Time, Allan planted four Nicotiana langsdorfii, one Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’, and an Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’.

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Sarah

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driveway garden

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Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ has been going strong in this spot for years.

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looking in the east gate of the fenced garden

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Allan planting

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He found a furtive dandelion.

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tulips (Flaming Spring Green and a parrot in bud)

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the burgeoning garden

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Tulip ‘White Parrot’

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blue inside

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Tulip ‘Artist’ hiding under rhubarb

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Tulip ‘Artist’

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tree peony in bud

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fringed pink tulip

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Thalictrum ‘Elin’ will get about 7 feet tall.

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“pink” narcissi

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more narcissi

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Fritillaria meleagris, in the lawn bed that I note needs mulching.

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double hellebore

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white narcissi

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Podophyllum (Allan’s photo)

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Mary, her friend Katie, Bella, and Katie’s dog Libby, back from the beach (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photos: a hard to reach blackberry sprout across the pond

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He got it.

Ilwaco

We drove around by the port on the way home, just to see how lively the 4-20 event was at the Freedom Market pot shop. (Their outdoor barbecue looked well attended.)

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garden boat at Time Enough Books (PV=Plant Vessel instead of FV for Fishing Vessel).  Allan’s photo

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Tulip ‘Akebono’

While Allan mowed at the J’s (across the street), I planted some poppy and bachelor button seeds in the back garden.  The weeded spots in the east and west bed have seeds, and the unweeded spots will let me know where I can put new plants (after more weeding).

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a seeded spot

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At the J’s (Allan’s photo)

Next, our tour of the Oysterville garden.

And we really do have to get back to the beach approach weeding!

 

 

 

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When the Long Beach planters were installed years ago, no plan had been made for their planting and maintenance.  A volunteer “adopt a planter” program began with enthusiastic participants.  Unfortunately, because the enthusiasm tended to not last through the summers, the planters became weedy and unwatered by June.  Finally, a few years ago, we were asked to take over the planting and maintenance of all of them (36 on the main street, and maybe 20 more out on the beach approaches).  Because volunteers chose different plants, some of the planters still have full sized shrubs including non-dwarf barberries, escallonia, variegated euonymous, azaleas, and other too-large choices.  Each year, we re-do a couple of the planters.  In 2016, our mission is to make the planters on the two beach approaches better.  We experience more wind and salt out there, much more vandalism,  and a need, on the Bolstadt approach, to be completely drought tolerant, so wish us luck!

All of the hanging baskets are by Nancy Aust of the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Here are some photos of the planters through 2015.  If you click on a photo to embiggen it, you will get back and forth navigation arrows.

 

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Monday, 20 April 2015

I continued to work on my rather overwhelming garden, while Allan went to weed the terribly weedy garden at the community building, a project that I foolishly agreed to last week.  I so appreciated him deciding to get that started rather than taking a day off.  Here’s the problem:  I need time off more than I need money at the moment, and so does he.  We can’t afford to retire for several years, but we can afford to cut back…and yet, how can we with so many jobs?  Then I think…we should keep working like mad in case we have medical bills before medicare age (as in insurance co-pays and deductibles, something you UK readers don’t have to worry about).  And THEN I think, as Allan has pointed out, NOW is the time to have more time off while we are healthy enough to still enjoy it.  I remind myself that my mother was able to garden till age 82…but that was with me helping her.  She could garden on her own till about age 77…I hope I am as fortunate.  She retired at age 55, and that may have contributed to her years of healthiness.

my day at home

Before he left for work, Allan caught this bird checking out one of the birdhouses.

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The first thing I heard when I finally got outside at noon-ish was a great roar out beyond the bogsy wood, and I saw that the south gate was mysteriously wide open.  I don’t know how long it had been that way.  On the way out, I checked for a herd of deer in the garden.  None could be found, and the roses did not appear to be eaten.

Smokey followed me all the way out.

Smokey followed me all the way out.

The sound was from a big mower beyond the trees, and some sort of tree-mauler that was cutting down some of the willow that had sprouted up on the edge of the lawn between the port parking lots and us.

The view at noon.  I still have strimmed to the bench by the seasonal pond.

The view at noon. I still have strimmed to the bench by the seasonal pond.

The noise got louder and all the willows started to shake.  I hoped that all the little frogs could hop fast.  It must have been a bad time for them.

at 1:05

at 1:05

at 1:05 outside the gate, with the big machine tearing at the big willows

at 1:05 outside the gate, with the big machine tearing at the big willows

Fortunately, the trunks of the two big willows are on our property, which runs roughly to the middle of the ditch.

Fortunately, the trunks of the two big willows are on our property, which runs roughly to the middle of the ditch.

the view to the south at 1:30

the view to the south at 1:30

Well.  We will certainly have a better view of what is going on down at the port now.  Poor little frogs, though.  (Update: For the next several nights, I could hear the frogs peeping from the other ends of the ditch, but not from the middle part that had been mown and chopped.)

The seasonal pond all covered with floating wood chips.

The seasonal pond all covered with floating wood chips.

I'm glad I left a long grass frog haven on my side.

I’m glad I left a long grass frog haven on my side.

I had asked Allan to move two planted chairs all the way from a corner of the front garden to somewhere that they did not have to be shifted for weeding.  I like where he put them, in the salmonberry groves:

chairs

While all the tree-ripping was going on, I got much planting done: two trays of Nicotiana langsdorfii and several assorted Agastaches (‘Apricot Sunsrise’, ‘Summer Glow’, ‘Tutti Frutii’, ‘Cotton Candy’, ‘Sangria’, and ‘Mexican Giant’).

Later, I got my new Hellebores in and my two birthday plants.

I found that this new area was really pretty much full, if I am to leave proper room between plants.

I found that this new area was really pretty much full, if I am to leave proper room between plants.

my new little bloodroot right at the edge of the new garden bed

my new little bloodroot right at the edge of the new garden bed

a cool pulsatilla about to bloom

a cool pulsatilla about to bloom

in another bed, two little noses coming up...very big event for a CPN

in another bed, two little noses coming up…very big event for a CPN

My new candy lily seemed right for the mini-scree bed.

My new candy lily seemed right for the mini-scree bed.

Yesterday, when Debbie came to pick up plants for the Master Gardener plant sale (I’m not in the MGs, although I did take the course years ago), she gave me a flower sculpture by Sue Raymond of Bay Avenue Gallery

.  I installed it today, placing it where I could tie the stake to a post.

I love this exotic flower.

I love this exotic flower.

our garden boat, the Ann Lovejoy

our garden boat, the Ann Lovejoy

in the boat:  Tulip 'Green Wave'

in the boat: Tulip ‘Green Wave’

Tulip 'Angelique'  (pretty sure, although that green flame confuses me)

Tulip ‘Angelique’ (pretty sure, although that green flame confuses me)

Tulip 'Akebono' and 'Green Wave' in bud

Tulip ‘Akebono’ and ‘Green Wave’ in bud

More 'Green Wave' because it is my favourite this week.

More ‘Green Wave’ because it is my favourite this week.

Tulip 'Green Star'

Tulip ‘Green Star’

After the work done by the port staff, our view corridor is back.  The garden was designed around this in the first place.

view

When we first moved here in October 2010, the bogsy woods was thick with junk and brambles and we cleared a path through and eventually build the fence and the south gate; outside the gate is only lightly gardened on occasion and is a haven for happy frogs. Below, the bottom photo shows the area which is the view corridor now.

what our woods looked like in Oct. 2010 when we bought the place

what our woods looked like in Oct. 2010 when we bought the place

To whoever it was who did one of those annoying blog posts about words and phrases that she or he never wanted to read in another gardening blog, and included “view corridor”:  Oh, well!

The east bed still has lots of small (for now!) weeds and will be my next big project.

The east bed still has lots of small (for now!) weeds and will be my next big project.

The west bed is pretty well weeded except for a strip all along the back side, and an area behind the blue chairs.

The west bed is pretty well weeded except for a strip all along the back side, and an area behind the blue chairs.

that tall heather from the front garden...I keep trying to appreciate it more.

that tall heather from the front garden…I keep trying to appreciate it more.  I think I like it best in a pot.

I had a feeling my brand new Hosta 'Stiletto' would be slug food.  Dang it.

I had a feeling my brand new narrow leaved Hosta ‘Stiletto’ would be slug food. Dang it.

Next to it, the hosta I got from Mary Fluaitt when she moved away is proving to be very strong, just like its former owner.

Next to it, the hosta I got from Mary Fluaitt when she moved away is proving to be very strong, just like its former owner.

I'm loving the bronzy top knot on this mahonia in Allan's garden.

I’m loving the bronzy top knot on this mahonia in Allan’s garden.

Another look at the results of the weekend's main project.

Another look at the results of the weekend’s main projects…the front border…

...and the northeast corner.

…and the northeast corner.

my double file viburnum on the west side of the garage

my double file viburnum on the west side of the garage (deer proof!)

my lovely silver name-us forgettii

my lovely silver nameus forgettii  (Help me remember?)

One fringed Tulip 'Aleppo' has returned from a planting a few years old.

One fringed Tulip ‘Aleppo’ has returned from a planting a few years old.

Tulip 'Aleppo'

Tulip ‘Aleppo’

I got my new outdoor sit spot almost back…for now.  It will fill again quickly when annuals planting time arrives in a couple of weeks.

weeding and planting at home await me.

my sit spot two days ago

and this evening

and this evening

Allan’s day on

Meanwhile, Allan had nobly gone to weed at the community center for seven and a half hours.  Perhaps because his area of our garden is small (by his choice, as he has boating and motorcycling as hobbies as well as gardening, unlike my one-track mind), he is more willing to give up a day off.

Ilwaco Community Building

Ilwaco Community Building

The gardens are all on the west side of the building, which houses our beloved Ilwaco Timberland Library, a low cost lunch room for seniors, Ilwaco City Council meetings and Toastmaster meetings.  We have declined this gardening job several times.  Now it seems there is just NO ONE else willing to take it on, and even though we feel a great need for free time, a love for Ilwaco has trumped all and we are going to try to do it.  By try, I mean we will see how long we can stand it.

Here are Allan’s photos:

He started at the driveway entrance with the theory that is best to do the areas first that are parked next to or walked past by Ilwaco Timberland Library patrons.  The first area gave him hope that the job might go quickly.  The kinnickinnick sprawls around and while I feel it is kind of boring looking, there were not many weeds.

before and after

before and after; maybe someone else had pulled bindweed out of here earlier.

When he moved on the the top of two tiers between the parking lot and the sidewalk, he knew this was more than a one day job.  (Last year, we saw someone weeding for a whole week in these beds.  We wish she was still doing it!)

top tier, before

top tier, before

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before

after

after

after

after

I look upon this with despair as I can’t stand heather in a flat garden.  The other day a friend said that even though the boatyard garden is so very long, it helped to have interesting plants to weed among.  I am going to have to do something with this garden to make it more interesting to me if we are going to keep it in the long term.  Allan just quietly stated that he doesn’t like the heathers, either, nor does he like the fact that there is nothing flowering in the garden in the summer.  He also commented, and of course I agree, that it is a pain to have salal in the garden because it is popping up through everything, including the heather.  If we keep this job long term, the salal is going to be our mortal enemy.  (I think it is just lovely in the wild woods, by the way.)

behind the sign

behind the sign, before

after

after

strip along the sidewalk, before

strip along the sidewalk, before

before

before

after

after

another area along the sidewalk

another area along the sidewalk, before

after

after

How did we get into this?  It is one job I firmly did not want to take on because it has bindweed, horsetail, and, quite frankly, I am only interested in maintaining gardens we have created, with just a couple of exceptions. (Mayor Mike’s pretty little garden comes to mind because it was designed by a friend of mine who moved away, and I like it.)

I remember when the garden was being developed by a group of volunteers and I saw the big pile of dirt that they were planning to put back in.  I said “No!  No!  Don’t use that; it is FULL of BINDWEED!”  Bindweed was sprouting up all over it.  There was a chance that if that soil, dug out during the re-do of the parking lot, was just discarded, some of the bindweed would go away.  However, even a few little roots left down in the ground would easily create a menace within a year.  (I don’t know if that soil was re-used or not.)

The entrance garden: the outside was fine, as if someone has already weeded it.

The entrance garden: the outside was fine, as if someone has already weeded it.

Last time I saw the area above, it had dandelions.  We wonder if someone else is still doing part of the job and if there is going to be some mix up about us being hired.

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the entrance garden behind the wall, which we quite like, before

before

before

after, with ferns trimmed

after, with ferns trimmed

The last area that remained is the hardest, a tiered garden covered with vetch, bindweed, and a haze of other weeds.

a before photo of an area he did not get to today.  What a mess of vetch obscuring all the good plants.

a before photo of an area he did not get to today. What a mess of vetch obscuring all the good plants.

YOIKS!

YOIKS!

This area is steeply tiered and would be hard on my knee.

After some weeding. This area is steeply tiered and would be hard on my knee.

I can already see in my mind some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Eryngium migrating from my garden over to the bare areas in the community building garden.  Free plants would fit in well with the budget, and would add some summer colour.  Some clumps of baby poppies could perhaps be moved up from the boatyard, as there are certainly MORE than enough poppies in that garden.   With that sort of change, I could get up more enthusiasm for this new job.

When Allan got home, I said he should have a look at the work the port crew had done at the south end of our property.  He went and took this photo from the outside, and said something about going in there and prettying it up with a better sawing job.  Otherwise, he agreed that it is a positive thing to have our view of the port returned.  You can even see our sitting bench now.

our property, south side, now

our property, south side, now

Tomorrow, we must get back to work if the weather allows.  The forecast is iffy.  There are new roses to plant and fertilizer to apply at Jo’s garden.

Postscript:   Tuesday’s weather, drizzly with 23 mile an hour winds, inspired me to take another day off.  Allan worked a tiny bit, digging up about a dozen drab roses at Jo’s garden in preparation for planting some new ones, and helping Ed Strange shift some pots of bamboo at the Boreas Inn.   I had time to write a paean of praise to The Big Tiny and have set it to be a bonus book post tonight.

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Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Some garden admiration while loading the trailer for work:

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe 'Black Hero' returning for several years in a row.

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe ‘Black Hero’ returning for several years in a row.

a Hebe next to Erysimum 'Winter Orchid' (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

a Hebe next to Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

Port of Ilwaco

After a quick check on Spruce Street to see if the two street planters have been shifted to their new positions (they haven’t), we started weeding and fertilizing at the east end of Howerton Way and worked our way west.  One day was not enough time to do a perfect job. We got the biggest weeds and a lot of small ones and left a few more hidden areas unweeded for lack of time.    It would have been a great day to “Map my Walk”….if I had remembered.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

easternmost garden, before (Allan's photo)

easternmost garden, before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

looking west

looking west from Howerton and Elizabeth

While we were weeding that long bed, Mayor Mike stopped by, and over the course of the conversation I agreed to take on the community building garden.  What?  We are supposed to be cutting back.  My affection for Ilwaco won over good sense.  I have always said I would not do that garden with its bindweed, horsetail, and (in my often disagreed-with opinion) too much heather planted on level ground.  I am fussy about heather and only appreciate it on a slope.  Also, there is salal which I cannot abide in a garden.  (A fellow CPN later said to me, “Salal gets mowed.” So we’ll see if I can live with weeding around heather and salal.  We have two fewer private gardens in Ilwaco this year, and I said to Allan that the amount of work time will probably come out about the same as last year by adding the community garden.

At least I had the sense to tell Mike that we would not be able to get to it for a couple of weeks.  Lawdy, we don’t even have the Long Beach beach approach garden weeded yet and that usually takes us 6-7 days.

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan's photo)

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

with ornamental grass (Allan's photo)

with ornamental grass (Allan’s photo)

At the Ilwaco Pavilion garden bed, I had the urge to do some alteration.  Out came two clumps of Pacific Reed Grass and in went a Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’ and a couple of golden variegated lemon thyme and some seeds of ‘Twister’ California poppy.

before

before

after

after

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ and beautifully round santolinas

An orange helianthemum is blooming already.  How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

An orange helianthemum is blooming already. How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

I added one Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ to the garden on the south side of the Port Office.

port office garden

port office garden

As we went along all these gardens today, I fertilized selected plants rather than casting the fertilizer all over the beds.  I fear the latter approach would get loose dogs to digging.  I’m worried already that dogs will get into the port office bed and break off my precious alliums.

Allium albopilosum already blooming

Allium albopilosum already almost blooming

and another cluster of big fat buds

and another cluster of big fat buds

If dogs were drawn in by fertilizer smells, at least it would be unintentional damage unlike human finger blight; I also fear people finding the alliums irresistable to pluck, not realizing that each bulb is expensive and only produces one flower per year.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

We did a thorough weeding of the beds on the north side of the port office and Don Nisbett Art Gallery, despite a little argy- bargy about whether we were going too slow (so quoth Allan) and me wanting to achieve something like perfection because the Saturday Market will be open with people walking past the gardens.

before

before

after

after

before

before

after2

The bed above is proof that even though narcissi perennialize, they sometimes have to be replenished.  They have petered out completely here so we must plant more next fall.

As we weeded those beds, a fellow engaged us in conversation and gave us his attractive business card.  He will have a booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market this summer, selling varieties of cherry tomatoes and (I think) some sort of condiments or sauces.  His items sounded delicious.

card

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

By the time we reached the next bed, adjacent to Time Enough Books, I was having to sacrifice perfection for speed.  If we did not get the boatyard done today as well, we would not have time to do our north end jobs this week.  We got most of the weeds and I hoped that the river rock and many beach strawberries would disguise the little grasses that we left behind.

Time anxiety ruled and some weeds had to be skipped over.

Time anxiety ruled and some little weeds had to be skipped over.

While we were weeding somewhere along this stretch, someone from a passing car yelled out “We love you!” or maybe “I love you!”  By the time I uncricked my neck and looked up, the vehicle was two blocks away.  If indeed the words were directed at us, it was much nicer than being honked at.  The honking, while usually from friends, is jarring and startling when one is working along a busy street, especially in Long Beach.

I deadheaded the tulips in the Time Enough Books garden boat; they are yellow to catch the eye of passersby.

boat

west

Tulip 'Akebono' (left) is my favourite this year.

Tulip ‘Akebono’  is my favourite this year.

Tulip 'Akebono'

Tulip ‘Akebono’

Tulip 'Akebono'; note the thin red petal outline

Tulip ‘Akebono’; note the thin red petal outline

lily flowering Tulip 'West Point'

lily flowering Tulip ‘West Point’

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

time

Narcissus 'Baby Moon' blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

By the time we got to the two westernmost garden beds, I had despaired of getting to the boatyard at all, and while weeding I brooded about which jobs we would have to skip in order to get Ilwaco and Long Beach completely groomed for the clam festival on Saturday.  As one might expect when one is running out of time, the last two beds proved to be exceptionally weedy.  We had filled almost every bucket with weeds, so Allan drove off to the east end of the port to dump the debris.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

He's sorry this photo came out blurry...but look at that strut!

He’s sorry this photo came out blurry…but look at that strut!

At this grim hour, as I kept slogging along on that exceptionally weedy westernmost garden bed, who should track us down by Todd Wiegardt, newly moved back to the Long Beach Peninsula.  (You may recall that he has been mailing us cool plants since last summer.)  As we talked, he couldn’t resist weeding. With his expert help (he used to be the curator of the display garden for the famous Plant Delights Nursery in North Carolina), we got the last Howerton Way gardens done well enough to move on to the boatyard.  Just have a look at this photo album of the Juniper Level Botanic Garden of which he was curator and you will see why I had no worries that he might pull out a good plant.

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

Allan and Todd weeding

Allan and Todd weeding the last Howerton Way bed.

Todd’s weeding technique impressed me in that he has speed and the knack of removing the weeds without disturbing the soil very much.  (Turning the soil over encourages more weed seeds to germinate.)

On to the boatyard!  All the nasty big horsetail had started to poke out of the soil.  With less than two hours till sunset, we just tried to get most of it broken off (said to be more effective than pulling it) and the larger weeds and bindweed pulled.  The littler weeds will mostly have to wait till the week before the May 2 children’s parade.

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan's photo)

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

(Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

I had planted Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ all along the edge thinking how cute it would be all in flower for the parade.  Of course, as regular readers have heard me saying for weeks now, it is blooming WAY EARLY.  I doubt it will last till May 2nd.

 Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

two weeders (Allan's photo)

two weeders (Allan’s photo)

I finally had to call uncle as it looked like Todd could keep going; I had hit the wall.

indefatiguable

One of us was indefatigable and it was not me.

the man who saved the day!  (Allan's photo)

the man who saved the day! (Allan’s photo)

Thanks to Todd, we got the three block long boatyard done well enough to call it good for the early Saturday Market opening.  (The Market’s official opening day is May 2nd; this week is a sneak preview in association with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival.)

The Perserverance.

The Perserverance.

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Thursday, 21 November, 2013

Because the temperature got to at least as low as 30 F last night, I expected all my annuals to be down.  To my surprise, in the bright sunlight on the front porch, a hanging basket passed on to me by Mary N. (two doors down) still had some Calibrachoas in bloom.

in bright cold sunlight

in bright cold sunlight

In the shade of Allan’s garden, frost was still evident.

ajuga

ajuga

ice on the water feature (and Smokey following me as usual)

ice on the water feature (and Smokey following me as usual)

Geranium renardii in the front garden

Geranium renardii in the front garden

The frost in the shady areas at 11 AM reminded me that at our old house behind the boatyard, tucked right up against a hill to the west and south, frost lingered all day in winter when even our next door neighbour’s yard would thaw.  Allan and I would misjudge the weather and think it was too cold to work on days when the rest of the town was much warmer!  We would be pleasantly surprised when we got out into the sunnier world.

We did linger for ten minutes at Olde Towne this mid-morning waiting for the temperature to rise.  The annual Sanvitalia in the planter outside had gone to limp mush, so the Ilwaco planters need a check up.  Not today.

owner, chef, barista Luanne at Olde Towne

owner, chef, barista Luanne at Olde Towne

After our brief chat break with Luanne and Chester, we headed to Peninsula Landscape Supply for a load of Soil Energy.

Soil Energy coming up

Soil Energy coming up

“Soil energy combines composted wood products, aged screened sawdust, screened sand, composted chicken manure, lime, fertilizer and iron. (pH 6.2, brown tan in color, 38.9% organic matter)”

Bob, the neighbour dog, came to visit.

looking extra cute

looking extra cute

Bob, the neighbour dog, came to visit!

my buddy Bob

Back south in Long Beach, Allan and I planted bulbs in a strip of ground that has been rewired with new lighting:  Narcissi ‘Sweetheart’ and ‘Baby Moon’, Narcissus ‘Itzim’, and a mix of purple and white tulips.

The tulips will match purple signs on the side of the building.

before

The tulips came out of a bag of 100, the rest of which were slated for the Long Beach welcome sign.  They are a mix of purple and white and will match the purple signs on the edge of the building.

Then, while Allan added Soil Energy here and at the Summer House vacation rental next door, I walked around four blocks of planters, inserting the rest of the Baby Moons (six more per most planter) and pulling spent annuals.  OUT they came.  Almost all.

some Sanvitalia and California poppies still looking fine...with Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

some Sanvitalia and California poppies still looking fine…with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The sun did that glare thing again all day long and made it hard to see my work, cars, the curb, and pretty much everything.

The frost did not take down this Cerinthe volunteer!

The frost did not take down this Cerinthe volunteer!

Geranium 'Rozanne' still blue

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ still blue

intense blue sky as city crew puts up decorations

intense blue sky as city crew puts up decorations

The city crew is careful not to stand in my planters.  Back when the planters were done by volunteers, I did four.  I used to bug the city crew to not stand in them.  Later, when Parks Manager Mike Kitzman and city administrator of the era, Nabiel Shawa, wanted to hire me I said to Mike, “Why?  I figured you just thought I was a pest, always bugging your guys to not stand in the planters!”  My then-partner and I would actually stop our car to complain if we saw any “planter standing”.  Mike said he wanted me to be hired because my concern for the planters showed that I would really care about the job.

When I returned to the Fifth Street quadrant of parks, Allan had finished mulching the strip by Scrappucino…

after

after

and had planted bulbs and mulched at Summerhouse.

the very small Summer House garden

the very small Summer House garden

We planted tulip ‘Akebono’ and assorted yellow Narcissi, including ‘Rjinveld’s Early Sensation’.  ‘Akebono’ was a last minute, additional purchase from Colorblends.

Tulip 'Akebono' from Colorblends.  Wish I had gotten 100 instead of just 25.

Tulip ‘Akebono’ from Colorblends. Wish I had gotten 100 instead of just 25.

A few plants in the park in front of Marsh’s Free Museum and Captain Bob’s Chowder had gotten frost-blasted.  After cutting down the pineapple sage and removing the last of the cosmos, it looked like this.

marsh

We still need to cut down the Nepeta (catmint) ‘Walker’s Low’ along the front. Today we ran out of time.  I’ll leave most of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ standing well into the winter.

Our last job, and one causing me some anxiety about whether or not we would have time to finish it, was the Long Beach welcome sign.  At last, we ripped out the annuals, revealing lots of the horrible, thready type of horsetail that infests this planting box.

before

before, back and front

How satisfying to rip out the annuals.  Even though I had stopped deadheading them, the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ on the south side had still looked moderately good up until yesterday.  The Brachychome and Bidens along the edges still bloomed in blue and gold.  But I had had it with them!  Out they came.

a refreshing change

a refreshing change

Some Muscari has already popped up along the edge.  (That is not unusual.)  Under the nice, fresh mulch, we planted two tulips mixes from Colorblends.  Along the front of the sign, with its yellow sun, I chose the mix called Triathlon.

Triathlon, photo from Colorblends

Triathlon, photo from Colorblends

In previous years, I have used Red and Yellow Cubed but wanted something slightly different.

Red and Yellow Cubed, photo from Colorblends

Red and Yellow Cubed, photo from Colorblends

For the cooler colours on the north side of the sign, I have been using Shortwave mix.

Shortwave, photo from Colorblends

Shortwave, photo from Colorblends

This year, just for a small difference, I chose the slightly taller Triple Play mix.

Triple Play from Colorblends

Triple Play, photo  from Colorblends

We treat the tulips as annuals here and rip out the old ones in May.  They rarely come back as good looking on the second year, and the sign must be showy.

After dumping the debris at the City Works yard just as the sun began to set, we were heading for NIVA green when we noticed the colour of the sky.  Allan drove straight out to the Bolstadt parking lot and even though the sky was fading already, I got a photo with the boardwalk as foregr0und:

sunset over the Long Beach boardwalk

sunset over the Long Beach boardwalk

The several strollers along the boardwalk must have felt that they were floating in that peachy sky colour.  Or so it looks to me.

Circling back around, we had a brief visit with Heather at NIVA green.  We’d found, in a trash can, a metal sign saying STONER WAY.  She cuts up license plates for art and we thought, correctly, that she could make use of the sign.

Heather told us she is discontinuing her manufacture of purses made from old record albums, so get them while you can!

old LP purses

old LP purses, very labour intensive to make

I thought that several friends of ours might be able to make use of the Dammit Dolls:

dolls

dolls

These would be very handy when you find that you need expensive repairs on your roof, or a new washing machine.

We stayed only briefly as I had one more outdoor project.  In the near dark, we dumped the last four buckets of Soil Energy into the planter near First Place Mall (a tiny “mall” of a few storefronts).  That planter had been annoyingly low.  Four more annuals came out, and the lavenders got a quick trim (with very cold hands clutching the clippers).

Having read somewhere that one’s tastebuds decline with age, I have been trying to go to the delicious Pelicano restaurant once a month to enjoy their ever changing monthly specials.  We missed last month, and most of the summer months.  Even though, as Allan pointed out, we would be out for dinner three nights in a row, I suggested we go tonight simply because we had the time.  It was not at all hard to talk him into it.

Pelicano Restaurant

Pelicano Restaurant

delicious squash soup

delicious squash soup

My drink was a strong potion featuring apple cider from Pink Poppy Farm.  Our server was the delightful Ms. Pink Poppy herself.  Our gardening client Eric Wiegardt’s art adorned the walls.  The lights of the boats glowed just outside the window.  The port crew have decorated the street lamps with white lights for the holidays.  There was only one other table occupied, as we were dining early, and the two other diners were having a most interesting conversation that we could almost overhear.  (They sounded like the sort of women I’d like to be friends with.)  We celebrated finishing the planting of the Long Beach bulbs, very much the biggest batch of Bulb Time.

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