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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘China Town’’

Monday, 30 April 2018

Skooter taking in the sun on the front porch

My most beloved Monty Don (host of Gardeners’ World) says that black beetles are a sign of a healthy garden, and that they eat slugs.

Here’s one crossing our driveway this morning. (Allan’s photo)

I love the way the slightly darker, glossier post office sets off our volunteer garden:

Stipa gigantea

By the way, someone convinced me that Stipa should be pronounced with an i like pipe or ripe.  Montagu DON says Stee-pa. So! Stee-pa it is.

Allium neapolitanum

The Red Barn Arena

We met the new barn cat, Cosmo.

A Coast Guard helicopter flew overhead while we worked.

Allan’s photos

my new friend, 9 months old

Someone had left a gift of buttercup flowers in a barrel.

We are still not over our bad, debilitating colds, but we do feel more energetic today.

Tulip clusiana ‘Lady Jane’

crabbing gear at the barn

Diane’s garden

Allan added a bale of Gardner and Bloome mulch to the driveway corner garden.

before

after

I added an Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ and some more sweet pea seeds to the long roadside bed.

Our main focus was adding some Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’, Salvia patens, Nicotiana langsdorfii, and some seeds (alyssum, pale yellow cosmos ‘Xanthos’, night scented stock, peachy nasturtiums) to the raised septic garden.

Over the fence:

Allan’s photo

I am most pleased with the display so far in this new raised bed.

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’ in a pot

The Planter Box

We visited The Planter Box to see if they might have a columnar ornamental pear to replace one that got taken out by a drunk driver in Ilwaco.  The only one was THIS size:

PB co-owner Raymond is a tall man. This tree is maybe even too big to even fit in the sidewalk hole!

Well.  We had thought we were not going to have to be the ones to deal with the tree issue at all, and now that it is so late, we may just have to plant flowers in that one sidewalk spot. I heartily rejected the proposed idea (not proposed at the Planter Box!) that we should just put in a different kind of tree.  You cannot put in one odd duck in a run of ten street trees.

If only the Planter Box had had one the size of their manageable apple trees:

At the Planter Box:

Armeria maritima (sea thrift)

artichokes

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Due to bad weather, and our bad colds, and our Shelburne Hotel garden project, we had not been to KBC all month.  We found that the deer had been getting into the fenced garden and eating the roses.  Other than that, all looked well enough and we got the garden somewhat groomed and a few plants planted in a busy two hour gardening frenzy.  I was grateful that Allan did all the planting—my least favourite gardening job.

Allan’s photos:

a new Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ 

The podophyllum has gone from one leaf to three this year.

unfurling sword ferns

My photos:

tree peony

roses stripped by deer

Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Tulips ‘Black Hero’ and ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tetrapanax

viridiflora tulips

pond garden

tulips and Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

taking leave of the tidied up garden

more

On the way home, we made one little stop at the Shelburne, where Allan staked a little (will be big) Fuchsia ‘Sharpitor Aurea’; I had gotten worried it would be stepped on.

I had to do billing, so might not get to watch any Gardeners’ World this evening.  Maybe…just one episode at bedtime.

later:

Bliss. In episode five of year 2015, a jungle garden is visited.

You can watch the segment Here .

At age 60, Monty can gracefully flop to the ground to commune with the plants.

I envy that spryness.

Takeaway: “It is important to make ponds because we’ve lost the ponds that used to be on farmlands all over the country.”

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Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Shelburne Hotel

We planted an assortment of my favourite plants: Agastaches ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’ and ‘Golden Jubilee’, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Helenium ‘Mardi Gras’, Zaluzianskya ovata (which should give great fragrance in the evening, so it went by the pub deck and the front entry), Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ (in pots with a couple of the Zaluzianskya).  This involved removing plants that had scattered into the wrong places during our long absence (the years when we did not work here between 2009 and now), including more monkshood that is popping up here and there (too poisonous for a public garden).

I am still desperate for a Melianthus major ‘Antenow’s Blue’ to grow under the arched window as in days of old.  Plain melianthus would be too tall, and not as blue.  Can’t get Antenow’s Blue here!   I don’t want to mail order it; hoping Melissa will find me one at Xera Plants.

looking north from the entry

Years ago:

summer garden at the Shelburne Inn

looking south from the entry

the pub deck with a couple of newly planted pots

a couple of newly planted semi shade pots in the back garden

While we worked, a staff member was digging out the six back yard beds.  In yesterday’s heat, he had removed the railroad ties.  This area will be graveled and will become a wedding and event area.

progress in the back garden

as it was a week ago

Allan hose watered for the first time this year.

Allan’s photo

I had brought a bouquet for the lobby:

And the new sign by the street had been installed. Wait till you see the gorgeous job that Brady was doing on the trim.

You can see photos of the interior, old and new, in this article from Wander with Wonder.

We appreciate the mention by the author.

Just north of the Shelburne, across the street, Allan photographed an art gallery’s sign:

Long Beach

A fog had blown in, welcome but chilly enough to require a jacket.  We deadheaded the planters, tree beds, Veterans Field and Fifth Street Park.

My photos:

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘China Town’

Strong Gold tulip still going so strong.

tree garden

Tulip ‘Silverstream’ and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

Tulip greigii ‘Fire of Love’

Tulip greigii ‘Fire of Love’ and ‘Silverstream’

Muscari paradoxum

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ and ‘Black Hero’

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulips ‘Formosa’ and ‘Green Wave’

Fifth Street Park, where the horsetail was back!  And camassia.

Fifth Street Park

color clash! (The city crew greatly reduced the street trees this spring.)

Allan’s photos:

green primrose at city hall

in a planter

deadheading before

and after

camassia

camassia

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

The last two blocks of deadheading were a challenge as suddenly the weather was hot again and I SO regretted having a jacket on (but had no way to carry it and my weed/deadhead bucket and tools).  On the way home, we deadheaded the welcome sign.

welcome sign

At home: clean debris for the compost bins.

Allan’s photo

Allan went to the port office to check on yesterday’s plants, and we are pleased to know the office staff watered.

Allan’s photo

Because I planted more bachelor button seeds and added a clump of monarda (bee balm) to the Shelburne back garden (both have edible flowers), the work list got shorter.

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Tuesday, 24 April 2018

The weather seemed disturbingly warm as we went to work.

First, we did a couple of volunteer projects, planting a few perennials and some seeds at the fire station, and one agastache at the post office, where we happened to learn that a crew was about to power wash and paint the building.  Oddly, it seemed they did not have a hose and so they borrowed ours, and our special wrench that turns on the water.  We plunged in and moved all the rocks away from the bottom of the wall at the back of the garden.  They had been placed there by us years ago, when we dug up the lawn to make the garden and found that we had revealed an unpainted strip.  It will be good to have that strip painted and to have a path for  walking to the faucet without the rocks in the way.

Of course, I fretted about potential damage to the lilies that grow near the back.  The postmistress said she would put boxes over them.  It was not till later in the day that I realized what she meant.  We encountered Mayor Gary there and he told us we could take out the old and defunct irrigation hoses in the fire station garden.

A few blocks east, at Mike’s garden, we realized it had become painfully hot.  We weeded and fertilized and got a few agastaches and eryngiums in the ground to try to make this odd little afterthought of an area look better:

sad little narrow side garden, part sun, part shade

white narcissi

We are still fretting about one conifer dying.

It is a goner, so they both have to go.

the front garden

Suddenly I could not take the heat anymore, so without finishing the weeding of the gravel path, we went home.  I learned that it was 81 degrees, and a friend got a reading of 87 out on the Bolstad beach approach.

Skooter was snoozing on the bed.

not so little cat feet

Frosty played with his Kitty Karrot, a catnip toy made by a blog reader which has entertained the cats for well over a year.

We stayed indoors from two till six PM waiting for the temperature to drop.  I was glad to rest and finish reading A Breath from Elsewhere by Mirabel Osler,  as I am feeling puny with sniffles and sneezes and just a bit of a cough.  Not leaving my comfy chair, I made a blog post for the next morning and then accidentally published it.  I blame an overheated brain. It was still 79F at 5:30.

With two hours of daylight left, I dug up about fifteen starts of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, admiring some tulips on the way into the back garden.

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Narcissus with a tiny green cup, and Tulip ‘China Town’

We quested fruitlessly for our faucet wrench back at the post office.  We did find the sort of boxes that the postmistress used to protect the lilies:

Allan’s photos

She is wonderful.  The priority mail boxes made me laugh.  They were boxes that customers had opened up the wrong way.

At the fire station, Allan removed the old hoses from the corner garden while I planted the sedums along the west side.

No before photo was taken of the corner garden hoses.  I have this one from earlier.

And tonight:

On the south side of the port office, we planted Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’ and some santolinas where Allan had dug out old, woody lavenders.

looking west

looking west

looking east

At home, the work board had gotten a tiny bit shorter:

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

I got very little sleep because of worrying that we were both going to get sick.  With the clam festival coming up, we had much to do in Long Beach town.  There is no back up plan if we can’t do it; all of our other working gardener friends are even busier than we are.

Little dramas loom large when one is self employed.

Allan felt poorly in the morning with sniffles and a cough, and yet with the good weather, we did go to work.  It is maddening; we were so good about disinfecting our hands every time we went somewhere public, and yet…the germs got him.

If only we could have followed Skooter’s example:

Skooter

(Skooter has a chin condition, a problem common with orange cats, says the vet.  My orange cat of years ago, Valene, had the same thing.)

On the way, we dropped off a book at the library (housed in the Ilwaco Community Building).

at the Ilwaco Community Building

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ at the community building

The community building garden needs a bit of weeding…(not shown in the photos above).

In case I end up having to go to work on the bus later this week, we went to the two least-accessible-by-bus jobs first.

The Red Barn

Because I am thinking of using a different plant for the centerpiece of the Ilwaco planters, Allan pointed out how good the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ looks at the Red Barn.  They get less wind here.

My very good friend Rosie was at the barn.

Diane’s garden

My very good old friend Misty greeted us next door at Diane’s garden.

snoozing

till the camera clicked

The septic box bulb display pleased me; we had missed some of it, of course.  After deadheading:

Muscari ‘Bling Bling’

Muscari paradoxum

I was pleased to find sweet peas just emerging along the picket fence.

The corner driveway garden needs mulching; soon, I hope. I asked Allan to take this photo, and did not get what I wanted, which is the fact that the Stipa gigantea grass is already showing flower spikes.  Oops, I should have specified.

Long Beach

Long Beach had been on the schedule for all day this coming Thursday, to get the parks and planters perfect for the Razor Clam Festival.  I was fretting about what would happen if we both got sick and could not work then.  So we did a lot of it today, which led to more fretting on my part that I was going to make Allan sicker by having him work.  I brooded about how I recently delayed one day taking Calvin to the vet, prioritizing work instead because he seemed not especially sick, and then…we know how that turned out.

We went down the six downtown blocks of street trees and planters, deadheading.  I felt reassured each time I saw Allan taking a photo, figuring it must mean he did not feel too terrible.  (He said, “It’s easier than working!”)

Allan’s planter and tree garden photos:

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ and Tulip ‘Silverstream’ and Tulip sylvestris

Geum ‘Mango Lassi’ and muscari

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in street tree garden (with tulip)

Tulip ‘China Town’ and Fritillaria meleagris

Tulip ‘Princess Irene’

AKA ‘Prinses Irene’

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

Van Engelen catalog says: A magical sport of Jewel of Spring, fragrant Silverstream ranges from creamy-yellow to deep yellow with red feathering, to red with every combination in between. But the surprise garden party doesn’t stop there: it has showy, attractive foliage with silver-white margins. (Did you know that the phenomena of marginated foliage occurs due to a lack of or insufficient pigmentation and chlorophyll in the plant cells on the outer petal edges?)

I did not think to smell the tulips nor did I notice white margins on the foliage.

street tree garden

Tulips ‘Green Wave’ and ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

lower left: a tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ that went mushy with rain

My planter and tree garden photos:

Tulips that had been broken, and not by the wind.

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

As you can tell by now, I planted a big run of Silverstream through town.  I think they are too tall to choose again.  And the color variation is nice but it does not thrill me.

one of the viridiflora (green) tulips…too tired to look it up

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’ in one of the windiest planters. Short and strong.

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’…would that all tulips were this tough

more Silverstream

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ and Tulip acuminata

Tulips ‘Sensual Touch’ and ‘Black Hero’

Tulips ‘Green Star’, sylvestris, acuminata

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulips ‘Prinses Irene’, ‘Sensual Touch’, ‘Black Hero’

We also weeded in Fifth Street Park because…Razor Clam Festival!  Fifth Street Park needs so much more attention, and I hope we can do more later this week.  So much horsetail, so much wild garlic.  (No photos there.)

We went on to Veterans Field, which will be the central place for the clam festival.  It is not ideal to deadhead and weed four days before the festival, but needs must.

Veterans Field flag pavilion garden

The last time we were in Long Beach, Allan asked where the blue was in that arc garden.  I said the grape hyacinth along the edge.  Well, now look at what a string trimmer did:

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’ as was

And right before the festival, when we were trying to make it perfect despite feeling poorly.  I wanted to lie down on the lawn and blub, but it would be too hard to get back up again.  Some white narcissi were also casualties along the edge.  Then I thought…Ok, maybe this is a sign that I do not have to struggle so hard and fret so darn much about making it perfect.  Maybe I can stop worrying about whether we will be able to get back to deadhead on Thursday.

Still….dang blang it!

On the way south, we deadheaded the welcome sign.

And finally, we paused at the

Shelburne Hotel

where I planted 9 more violas and two Agastache ‘Apricot Sunrise’.  I would like to have weeded more, but we had already worked four hours longer than I had originally planned and Allan was not feeling any better.  The question is, was it wiser to work today so that we can take a day off? Or did it make everything worse?  It would have been so bad if we had stayed home today and then both got sick and couldn’t do a thing before the weekend.  It would be even worse if we got even sicker.  Such woes of self employment have plagued me for the last 42 years.

three by the fig tree, the rest in front

If the gardens in Long Beach are not perfect when you attend clam festival, you now know why.  We forgot to stop at First Place Mall on the way south and deadhead the one dead narcissus that I noticed in the planter there.  I will try not to lose sleep over it.

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Tuesday, 10 April 2018

I was mighty surprised to wake up to working weather.

looking out the front door

I wish I could photograph white flowers well.  I guess I need to read up on how to do it.  I do find it helps to boost the highlights in editing.

at home, Fritillaria meleagris alba (backed with the regular purple ones)

Long Beach

I was eager to finish the mulching of the Long Beach trees and planters.  The day would be interrupted by another project, but we got a good start while waiting for a text.

First, the mulch. The pile is getting very low; we are promised more soon. (Allan’s photo)

It was so windy….and not especially cold.

Veterans Field, Allan’s photo. The ginormous American flags had been taken down, probably because of the storm.

I love peony and fringed tulips.  Some have turned to mush because of the rain, but not all.

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’, Tulip acuminata (also a tulip that I love)

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ (Allan’s photo)

another wee species tulip (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Tulip ‘Silverstream’ (Allan’s photo)

A business had left out some flourescent tubes in the garden…for the city crew to pick up, apparently??  I hope no one decides it would be fun to break these into the garden bed.

Allan’s photo

Our text arrived that Sea Star Gardening had dropped off a fig tree for us, so we stopped Long Beach and drove a couple of miles south to

The Shelburne Hotel

When I had emailed owner Tiffany to ask if she’d like a fig tree in the back garden (a herbs and edibles theme), she replied that she had, the very night before, dreamed that she was trying to figure out where to put a fig tree there.  That’s cosmic.  I replied that it could go into a warm nook on the south wall (where it might eventually fill in the space and need some pruning.  Maybe after we retire! If we ever do).

yesterday

I fervently hoped that I would not find a stump under the tatty landscape fabric in that nook.  I remembered how years ago a big ball of conifer grew in there.  No stump was found, hallelujah!

Allan’s photo

There was much sotto voce and sometimes whispered argy bargy about proper depth of the hole, what to do with the gravel, and so on.  We don’t want to end up on a Trip Advisor review as the arguing gardeners who ruined a guest’s peaceful afternoon.

We pulled out the lightweight fabric and used the gravel to make a building maintenance and wood protection U shaped edge, planted the tree,  and put in some herbs for now (which eventually will get moved because of fig tree shade).

The six railroad tie enclosed squares in the back garden are going to be removed to make a big patio.  I saved a French sorrel from one of those beds and planted it in front of the fig…It will be okay there for awhile.  When we get the west beds cleared of orange montbretia, we will also save the many chives and make an edge out of them.

In the front garden, some Tulip ‘Lilac Wonder’ are left from bulb plantings I did over ten years ago.

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

Our project took a couple of hours (along with some weeding). Today would have been a good day to dig out orange montbretia in the sheltered, almost windless Shelburne garden, but instead we went back to

Long Beach

to finish mulching the trees and planters.

Just as we were leaving the Shelburne, I got a call from Parks Manager Mike that the crew had removed the huge miscanthus which had been crammed (by the original landscape architect) into a narrow bed in Fifth Street Park.  We went to fix up that area first thing.

last November

the cut back grass after we tagged it a couple of weeks ago

before, the rose can breathe easy this summer. (Allan’s photo)

after, with an Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ added. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

In the city works yard, where we bucketed up enough soil for the last two blocks, we saw the resident killdeer.

The pile is almost gone now. (Allan’s photo)

The wind of 25-35 mph had gotten not just pushy but cold, so the last two blocks were a miserable time. I had almost decided to leave it for another day. However, when loading the soil, I remembered that the new season of Deadliest Catch starts tonight.  I would have felt weak and foolish if I had quit the job because of some cold dry wind, gone home, and found later that Deadliest Catch was on my DVR.

Our work is not this hard.  (photo courtesy Discovery Channel, Deadliest Catch)

I had not taken many photos today because the wind sapped my enthusiasm.  In the final two blocks, I managed a few.

Muscari armeniacum

tiny white narcissi with tiny cup

Narcissi bulbocodium ‘Golden Bells’

a different and more subtle muscari

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘China Town’

We had enough buckets of soil left to weed and mulch the “tiny pop outs” on Ocean Beach Boulevard, a block north of city hall.  That was the coldest and worst part of the the day.

a sad mess, before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

 

Don’t look close; I did not get every weed.

I have decided to not battle the yellow evening primrose in these little beds, having read in The Evening Garden that it is fragrant at night.  Neither of these get any supplemental water in summer unless we remember to bucket water them.

The red rhododendron is in bloom at city hall.

This mean it must be soon be time to make a spring visit to Steve and John’s Bayside Garden!

On the way home, we paused to photograph the welcome sign, where the tulips are coming on strong.

In the front, I tried a different Colorblends mix than usual, “Big Ups.”

just starting out, hope the deer don’t browse them…

The back has ‘Trident Mix’.

At home, I was able to erase three jobs from the work board.  (The roses thing is just to dig up a few more rugosa roses along the street edge of the beach approach for two friends who want some but were out of town during our clean up of that garden.)

If the forecast of rain and 45 mph wind comes true for tomorrow, it will most decidedly not be a work day.

 

 

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Tuesday, 22 April 2014

Oh, the accursed cold wind…We headed out optimistically with some plants in the van, thinking to get all the way to Klipsan Beach Cottages and then pick up a load of soil for where the pampas grass had been removed, by backhoe, at the entrance to The Anchorage Cottages.  First we went through Long Beach so I could take a couple of photos to show to the powers that be at Ilwaco City Hall.

Long Beach hole in the ground with quick connect hose

Long Beach hole in the ground with quick connect hose

The Ilwaco planters are still in play, it seems, and we may still be making a proposal. When the city put the job out for propsals,  and we initially decided not to propose, we were at first sad, then hugely relieved and even jubilant to no longer be facing four months of bucket watering.  We realized that we, and that means mostly Allan last year, have been carrying 20 five gallon buckets of water every third and sometimes every second day.  That comes to about 670 lbs of water per watering session (assuming about a gallon spills as he wrestles the bucket out of our utility trailer).

We probably would have continued watering the planters by bucket until we keeled over with buckets in hand.  But now we have been forced to think about the job and we realized we don’t want to do that anymore.  We are trying to find a solution because some locals really want us to do the job.

One year we did try to use a water pump truck.  Even with a powerful battery and a powerful pump, it took an extra 45 minutes to water each time, because of the time spent coiling and uncoiling hoses and waiting for water to come out of the hose.  We did not have 45 extra minutes to spare so we went back to the quicker method of using buckets.

We were chatting with Long Beach administrator Gene Miles about how hard it is to bucket water and he said “Why doesn’t the city put faucets in the ground with quick connects?”  What a concept!  We have a few of those in Long Beach, as shown in the photo above.  We realized how wonderful it would be for us, or for whoever had the job, to have a faucet available at each intersection to which a hose could be hooked up to water four planters and four trees.  If the hose did not reach to a planter in the middle of the block, it would be easy to fill a watering can and walk half a block to the planter.  We realized that we are quite simply through with bucket watering.  I’m almost 60 and Allan is 61; this bucket watering thing has got to end because it is physically the hardest and most exhausting and dreaded part of our work week.  We are hoping that our town decides it will be possible to install such an arrangement at each intersection (four in all) and if they do, the planter job will be easier for anyone to do.

With that photo mission accomplished, we swung by The Anchorage to make sure the pampas grass had indeed been removed.  And they had.

Anchorage Cottages: It's a short walk through beach pines and dunes to the beach.

Anchorage Cottages: It’s a short walk through beach pines and dunes to the beach.

The grasses were in the entry bed just where the drive curves, left of the pointer.

The grasses were in the entry bed just where the drive curves, left of the pointer.

The pampas grasses as they were...from the Anchorage Cottages website

The pampas grasses as they were…from the Anchorage Cottages website

In the past year, the work crew at the Anchorage have cut down the plumes just before their peak, because the fluff, blown by the wind, gets into all sorts of ventilation grates on the cottages and sticks to everything.  I said, if you are not going to let them bloom, which is the only good thing about them, get rid of them!

The weeds left behind were more extensive than I had imagined, a veritable lawn in places.

The pampas grass had hidden quite a mess.

The pampas grass had hidden quite a mess.

I realized immediately that there would be no Klipsan Beach Cottages gardening that day and we began to weed.  The white flowered Escallonia iveyi shrubs looked beaten up by our cold winter with lots of dead twigs so we cut them way back to where there is nice firm new growth at the base.

escallonia before pruning

escallonia before pruning

waiting out a squall in the van, looking west toward beach pines and dunes

waiting out a squall in the van, looking west toward beach pines

With the weeding done, we went to The Basket Case to get a few lavenders and armeria (sea thrift) for the Long Beach planters. I thought we would have time to do some planting in the very late afternoon.  The annuals greenhouse is full of luscious plants that we will not start planting till around Mother’s Day, my magical date for the weather being, one hopes, warmer and the high winds being over.  (This theory has not always worked as we have had some high wind after Mother’s Day that has been mighty hard on little cosmos.)

Basket Case annuals house

Basket Case annuals house

next door to The Basket Case, a stunning double file viburnum

next door to The Basket Case, a stunning double file viburnum

Just up the road was our next destination, Peninsula Landscape Supply.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We offloaded the escallonia debris....

Allan offloaded the escallonia debris….

The debris pile will be ground up and turned into this sort of aged mulch.

The debris pile will be ground up and turned into this sort of aged mulch.

And then we got a yard of Soil Energy.

And then we got a yard of Soil Energy.

I thought about our next acquisition which will be a load of pea gravel to top off the recently weeded garden at the 42nd Street Café.

an hour of gravel shifting looms in our future...

an hour of gravel shifting looms in our future…

back we go, west on Pioneer Road, past the Cranberry Research Station to the Anchorage

back we go, west on Pioneer Road, past the Cranberry Research Station to the Anchorage

I had seen a scrim of weeds along one of the garden beds at The Anchorage so I set to work on that.  Allan was able to park right next to the former pampas grass bed so the offloading of the lightweight soil energy was fairly easy. (By the way, we have never chosen to plant a pampas grass anywhere; these were old plants from before our time.)

Anchorage center courtyard; imagine a strong, cold, miserable wind blowing.

Anchorage center courtyard; imagine a strong, cold, miserable wind blowing.

Many of the tulips had held up to the weather.

Tulip 'Virichic'

Tulip ‘Virichic’

more tulips in the center courtyard

more tulips in the center courtyard

late tulips still coming on

late tulips still coming on

I'm concerned that the larger shrubs in the courtyard have had a hard winter...and may be as tired of the wind as I am.

I’m concerned that the larger shrubs in the courtyard have had a hard winter…and may be as tired of the wind as I am.

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' in the courtyard.

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in the courtyard.

We still have not found time to prune down the Viburnums by the office...They have to be kept below the window boxes, and the top leaves look battered by winter.

We still have not found time to prune down the Viburnums by the office…They have to be kept below the window boxes, and the leaves look battered by winter.

by the office, Tulips 'Jackpot ' and 'Rococo'

by the office, Tulips ‘Jackpot ‘ and ‘Rococo’

'Irene' and 'China Town' are a colour clash that I did not intend.

‘Irene’ and ‘China Town’ are a colour clash that I did not intend.

Strong Gold is going on for weeks...almost over now.

Strong Gold is going on for weeks…almost over now.

Parrot Tulip 'Green Wave' in bud, one of my favourites

Parrot Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in bud, one of my favourites

Parrot Tulip 'Rococo' just barely hanging on

Parrot Tulip ‘Rococo’ just barely hanging on

I have noted that the peony flowering tulips, like Angelique and Sensual Touch, tend to molder away in the rain.  Despite their similar frilliness, the parrot tulips do beautifully and last a long time and look wonderful even as they shatter.

The birdbath by the office.

the birdbath by the office

Behind the birdbath I saw some weedy grass.  The wind had me chilled and miserable and I had decided I could not even stand to plant anything in Long Beach.  Maybe the rosemary by the police station.  Maybe a couple of lavenders?  I just wanted to be home with a nice hot cuppa tea.

not today...

not today…

As we raked out the soil energy mulch and packed up our gear, the wind got worse and the sky looked ominously dark.

today's project, after

today’s project, after

done just in time...

done just in time…

and then the rain came

and then the rain came

I tried to check Dark Sky (a weather app) and was told where we were….

in the middle of nowhere!

in the middle of nowhere!

a few blocks closer to town....

a few blocks closer to town….

and at 642.weather.com, I saw the wind had been 27 mph at their Sandridge Road weather station, inland so usually less windy.

and at 642.weather.com, I saw the wind had been 27 mph at their Sandridge Road weather station, inland so usually less windy.

We drove down First Avenue in Ilwaco, scouting for gravelly or grassy spots at the four intersections where maybe the city could put in water faucets for the planter watering.

dark skies at the Ilwaco boatyard

dark skies at the Ilwaco boatyard

The plants in the van would have to just go for a ride and wait for better weather.  At home, it became clear we had made the right decision to stop working.

I had hoped that Anchorage would only need half of the soil energy mulch so that I could put some onto the pile next to Nora’s driveway, for planting some veg there later.  The Anchorage had needed the entire yard and I was awfully glad to have none left to offload in the rain.

from my southeast window, this project will have to wait.

from my southeast window, this project will have to wait.

Nora's bluebells

Nora’s bluebells

reflected in the wet driveway

reflected in the wet driveway

rain to the south

rain to the south

Allan worked on his rechargeable electric chainsaw...in the kitchen sink.

Allan cleaned his rechargeable chainsaw…in the kitchen sink.

A dramatic downpour turned Nora’s driveway into a river.

downpour

battered the south windows...

battered the south windows…

east window

east window

Later I saw that the tulips in my garden boat had turned to face me.

Later I saw that the tulips in my garden boat had turned to face me.

beautiful in disarray

beautiful in disarray

I had plenty of time to create the long and involved blog entry about visiting Stephen and John’s garden on the previous day.   My ear panged with a sharp intermittent ache, I hoped just from the cold wind as I do not have time to be sick.  And then we watched some telly that I had been longing to see:  the season premiere of The Deadliest Catch.  I’d been thinking all day that I needed a refresher in how hard crabbers work insanely long hours in the worst weather.  When out in the wind, or worse yet wind and rain (which we try to avoid but there are gardening emergencies related to upcoming tourism events), I repeat to myself, “It could be worse; I could be crab fishing on the Bering Sea.”

my inspiration

my inspiration

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday 19 April 2014

After the beach clean up and a drive to Long Beach in the pouring rain, we parked in the east parking lots and as we got out of our vehicle, the rain stopped.  A half a block walk took us to the Fifth Street Park frying pan and clam sculpture and there we found the Cosmic Bombshells posing bravely in the chilly air.

Cosmic Bombshells

Cosmic Bombshells

bombshell

The streets were crowded with tourists and locals, many looking damp from the downpour that had just ended.  Most were converging upon the park for the dedication of the World’s Largest Spitting Clam sculpture, now working again after years of not spitting.  For probably the last time, I have to post the poignant letter that my dear friend Montana Mary wrote after a visit to Long Beach in 1997.

Mary's letter in the Chinook Observer

Mary’s letter in the Chinook Observer

and today...the clam will squirt again.

and today…the clam will squirt again.

Our flower bed closest to the clam had retained some bright colours through the storm.

Our flower bed closest to the clam had retained some bright colours through the storm.

windblown tulips

windblown tulips

Cosmic Bombshells warming up.

Cosmic Bombshells warming up.

little dogs in the audience

little dogs in the audience

the crowd awaits

the crowd awaits

The Bombshells hold the ribbon.

The Bombshells hold the ribbon, and crew member Rick Fitzgerald waits to activate the clam.

sign

The Mayor made a speech and then asked young Avery to help cut the ribbon.

Avery about to cut the ribbon

Avery about to cut the ribbon

cutting

And it is done.

And it is done.

itisdone

Some folks had a jolly time putting quarters in the brand new machine and making the clam squirt for photo opportunities.

umbrella

park2

Across the street, people enjoyed the northwest quadrant of the park.

After a little while, we walked a block north toward Veterans Field to see a clam fritter fry-up in one of the town’s giant frying pans.

I found some dead narcissi flowers despite all our efforts to achieve perfection yesterday.  Fortunately, I had clippers in my pocket (which I had already used to deadhead some wind-shattered tulips in Fifth Street Park). Many, but not all, flowers had held up well.

planters

Tulips Princess Irene and China Town

Tulip viridiflora 'China Town' in front of the carousel

Tulip viridiflora ‘China Town’

From Van Engelen’s catalog:  “Highly awarded, China Town opens pale pinkish-white with bold green feathering and striking white-edged, blue-green foliage. As its long-lasting flowers mature, they deepen in color to rich phlox-pink with carmine-rose edges and somewhat less prominent green feathering. It is a bit short for a late blooming Tulip, growing to just 12″ tall, so it is perfect for border clusters where you can take advantage of its amazing flower and foliage show.

In our eyes, China Town has the best marginated foliage of all Tulips with the thickest, most highly contrasted edging. (Did you know that the phenomena of marginated foliage occurs due to a lack of or insufficient pigmentation and chlorophyll in the plant cells on the outer petal edges?)”

the very sturdy and long blooming Princess Irene

the very sturdy and long blooming Princess Irene

From Van Engelen catalog:  “Princess Irene:  An exotic blend of soft orange, flushed warm purple, this 1949 award-winner is absolutely breathtaking and quite fragrant.”

The Long Beach carousel

The Long Beach carousel

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a lily flowering tulip in a street planter

a lily flowering tulip in a street planter

At Veterans Field, the same tireless city crew member worked on getting the propane flames going on the giant frying pan.  The wind made the task difficult.

P1070430_2

It was not an easy task.

It was not an easy task.

The Cosmic Bombshells posed with more attendees.

The Cosmic Bombshells posed with more attendees.

This beautiful dog had just returned from being a therapy dog for people in the Oso landslide.

This beautiful dog had just returned from being a therapy dog for people in the Oso landslide.

stage and food tent

stage and food tent

On the stage, the new North Jetty Brewing Company's beer concession.

On the stage, the new North Jetty Brewing Company’s beer concession.

The tulips by the stage showed the effects of the weather.

tulips

I found our friend Bill of The Boreas Inn at the Lost Roo Restaurant food booth.

bill

bill2

Allan bought us some tasty pulled pork sandwiches and the beer was very tasty as well.  I ordered a “half”, which seemed to mystify the vendor, although it would be common in the UK.  More than half a glass and I would have run out of energy to take photos.

yummy with coleslaw

yummy with coleslaw

From the stage, you can see how very small our Veterans Field garden actually is.

From the stage, you can see how very small our Veterans Field garden actually is, around the flag pole area.

The crowd grew thicker around the frying pan tent.  Of course, the garden is very significant to us.

flowers

'Flaming Parrot tulip'

‘Flaming Parrot tulip’

The Resolectrics took to the stage next to the beer concession.

The Resolectrics took to the stage next to the beer concession.

Resolectrics

Resolectrics, Allan’s photo

The crowds closed in thickly around the frying pan tent where culinary students from Ilwaco High School competed in a clam fritter contest.

dogs

 

tent1

I'd wait till someone moved, then weasel in to get a photo.

I’d wait till someone moved, then weasel in to get a photo.

audience members

audience members

Del (Delvis) Murry, city councilman, interviews one of the students.

Del (Delvis) Murry, city councilman, interviews one of the students.

culinary students

culinary students

City crewman poised to deal with any propane problems.

City crewman Rick Fitzgerald poised to deal with any propane problems.

And the adjusting of the flame continued because of the gusty wind.

And the adjusting of the flame continued because of the gusty wind.

Three celebrity chefs from Tom Douglas restaurants came from Seattle to judge the clam fritter competition:  Brock Johnson of The Dahlia Lounge, Liam Spence from Lola, and Desi Bonow of the Palace Kitchen.

 

judges

judges

At last the pan was hot enough.

At last the pan was hot enough.

pan

students

 

watching

 

 

preparing a plate

preparing a plate of samples for the audience

tasty little bites

tasty little bites

clambites

fritter bits

Sadly, I was preoccupied taking photos and forget to taste a sample.  They were well received.

a rave review

a rave review (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

One of the judges observes closely.

One of the judges observes closely (Allan’s photo)

 

From outside the ropes, I couldn't get a photo of the clams cooking like this fellow could...

From outside the ropes, I couldn’t get a photo of the clams cooking like this fellow could…

So I handed my camera to city councilman Delvis who got me this photo.

So I handed my camera to city councilman Delvis who got me this photo.

The fritters look small in the big pan.  I’m wondering if there will ever be a fry-up of the world’s LARGEST clam fritter.

It was done in 1940!

It was done in 1940!

A member of the city crew had constructed the world’s smallest clam gun.

clamgun

The judges considering the entries...

The celebrity chef judges considering the entries…

very seriously

very seriously

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

We did not stay to the end of the fritter competition; by leaving at 3:30 we were able to get to Ilwaco’s Olde Towne Café for dessert before they closed at 4:00.

A cream cheese cappucino bar is exactly what I had.

A cream cheese cappucino bar is exactly what I had.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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