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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’’

Monday, 30 April 2018

Skooter taking in the sun on the front porch

My most beloved Monty Don (host of Gardeners’ World) says that black beetles are a sign of a healthy garden, and that they eat slugs.

Here’s one crossing our driveway this morning. (Allan’s photo)

I love the way the slightly darker, glossier post office sets off our volunteer garden:

Stipa gigantea

By the way, someone convinced me that Stipa should be pronounced with an i like pipe or ripe.  Montagu DON says Stee-pa. So! Stee-pa it is.

Allium neapolitanum

The Red Barn Arena

We met the new barn cat, Cosmo.

A Coast Guard helicopter flew overhead while we worked.

Allan’s photos

my new friend, 9 months old

Someone had left a gift of buttercup flowers in a barrel.

We are still not over our bad, debilitating colds, but we do feel more energetic today.

Tulip clusiana ‘Lady Jane’

crabbing gear at the barn

Diane’s garden

Allan added a bale of Gardner and Bloome mulch to the driveway corner garden.

before

after

I added an Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ and some more sweet pea seeds to the long roadside bed.

Our main focus was adding some Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’, Salvia patens, Nicotiana langsdorfii, and some seeds (alyssum, pale yellow cosmos ‘Xanthos’, night scented stock, peachy nasturtiums) to the raised septic garden.

Over the fence:

Allan’s photo

I am most pleased with the display so far in this new raised bed.

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’ in a pot

The Planter Box

We visited The Planter Box to see if they might have a columnar ornamental pear to replace one that got taken out by a drunk driver in Ilwaco.  The only one was THIS size:

PB co-owner Raymond is a tall man. This tree is maybe even too big to even fit in the sidewalk hole!

Well.  We had thought we were not going to have to be the ones to deal with the tree issue at all, and now that it is so late, we may just have to plant flowers in that one sidewalk spot. I heartily rejected the proposed idea (not proposed at the Planter Box!) that we should just put in a different kind of tree.  You cannot put in one odd duck in a run of ten street trees.

If only the Planter Box had had one the size of their manageable apple trees:

At the Planter Box:

Armeria maritima (sea thrift)

artichokes

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Due to bad weather, and our bad colds, and our Shelburne Hotel garden project, we had not been to KBC all month.  We found that the deer had been getting into the fenced garden and eating the roses.  Other than that, all looked well enough and we got the garden somewhat groomed and a few plants planted in a busy two hour gardening frenzy.  I was grateful that Allan did all the planting—my least favourite gardening job.

Allan’s photos:

a new Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ 

The podophyllum has gone from one leaf to three this year.

unfurling sword ferns

My photos:

tree peony

roses stripped by deer

Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Tulips ‘Black Hero’ and ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tetrapanax

viridiflora tulips

pond garden

tulips and Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

taking leave of the tidied up garden

more

On the way home, we made one little stop at the Shelburne, where Allan staked a little (will be big) Fuchsia ‘Sharpitor Aurea’; I had gotten worried it would be stepped on.

I had to do billing, so might not get to watch any Gardeners’ World this evening.  Maybe…just one episode at bedtime.

later:

Bliss. In episode five of year 2015, a jungle garden is visited.

You can watch the segment Here .

At age 60, Monty can gracefully flop to the ground to commune with the plants.

I envy that spryness.

Takeaway: “It is important to make ponds because we’ve lost the ponds that used to be on farmlands all over the country.”

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Tuesday, 24 April 2018

The weather seemed disturbingly warm as we went to work.

First, we did a couple of volunteer projects, planting a few perennials and some seeds at the fire station, and one agastache at the post office, where we happened to learn that a crew was about to power wash and paint the building.  Oddly, it seemed they did not have a hose and so they borrowed ours, and our special wrench that turns on the water.  We plunged in and moved all the rocks away from the bottom of the wall at the back of the garden.  They had been placed there by us years ago, when we dug up the lawn to make the garden and found that we had revealed an unpainted strip.  It will be good to have that strip painted and to have a path for  walking to the faucet without the rocks in the way.

Of course, I fretted about potential damage to the lilies that grow near the back.  The postmistress said she would put boxes over them.  It was not till later in the day that I realized what she meant.  We encountered Mayor Gary there and he told us we could take out the old and defunct irrigation hoses in the fire station garden.

A few blocks east, at Mike’s garden, we realized it had become painfully hot.  We weeded and fertilized and got a few agastaches and eryngiums in the ground to try to make this odd little afterthought of an area look better:

sad little narrow side garden, part sun, part shade

white narcissi

We are still fretting about one conifer dying.

It is a goner, so they both have to go.

the front garden

Suddenly I could not take the heat anymore, so without finishing the weeding of the gravel path, we went home.  I learned that it was 81 degrees, and a friend got a reading of 87 out on the Bolstad beach approach.

Skooter was snoozing on the bed.

not so little cat feet

Frosty played with his Kitty Karrot, a catnip toy made by a blog reader which has entertained the cats for well over a year.

We stayed indoors from two till six PM waiting for the temperature to drop.  I was glad to rest and finish reading A Breath from Elsewhere by Mirabel Osler,  as I am feeling puny with sniffles and sneezes and just a bit of a cough.  Not leaving my comfy chair, I made a blog post for the next morning and then accidentally published it.  I blame an overheated brain. It was still 79F at 5:30.

With two hours of daylight left, I dug up about fifteen starts of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, admiring some tulips on the way into the back garden.

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Narcissus with a tiny green cup, and Tulip ‘China Town’

We quested fruitlessly for our faucet wrench back at the post office.  We did find the sort of boxes that the postmistress used to protect the lilies:

Allan’s photos

She is wonderful.  The priority mail boxes made me laugh.  They were boxes that customers had opened up the wrong way.

At the fire station, Allan removed the old hoses from the corner garden while I planted the sedums along the west side.

No before photo was taken of the corner garden hoses.  I have this one from earlier.

And tonight:

On the south side of the port office, we planted Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’ and some santolinas where Allan had dug out old, woody lavenders.

looking west

looking west

looking east

At home, the work board had gotten a tiny bit shorter:

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 12 November 2015

I woke to wind, and I lay for a bit thinking that the Depot Restaurant might be a sheltered spot to plant bulbs out of the southern gale.  Then I looked out the window and saw sheets of rain.  (The wind had been blowing so hard that it had hidden the sound of raindrops.)  Never mind.  Today would be the day to do the bulb spreadsheets (lists for each job, quantity, name, and price).

Allan took pretty much all the photos today other than some tulip photos of years past.

Mary (Allan's photo)

Mary

Too wet!

Too wet!

Allan's photo: Do you see my friend?

Do you see my friend?

Allan's photo

Our neighbour, Onyx, had found a sheltered spot to watch hummingbirds. Perhaps we need to fit him up with a BirdsBeSafe collar like our cats wear.

Allan's photo: Out of the wind

Out of the wind

Allan's photo: Our neighbour, Onyx, had found a sheltered spot to watch hummingbirds. Perhaps we need to fit him up with a BirdsBeSafe collar like our cats wear.

Allan's photo

Mahonia in Allan's garden

Mahonia in Allan’s garden

my rainy view

my rainy view from my spread sheet table

Tetrapanax buds

Tetrapanax buds

I thought the above were Tetrapanax FLOWERS till Todd told me they are just the buds, and that the flowers open white…if we only had a long enough summer.  I Googled to find a photo of the flower, and found it here, on a blog which includes one of my favourite quotations from my favourite author:

“People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.” – Iris Murdoch

Allan went to get the mail and observed these workers on a roof nearby, who unlike us, had not been able to take the day off.  They’d been working on this roof for a few days and I am sure they had hoped to get it done before this storm.

DSC01649

Meanwhile, I got a text from Todd that he was actually out on gardening jobs in this weather.  While looking up wind gusts later on, I found this map that shows the difference in wind intensity between Ilwaco and the north end of the Peninsula where Todd lives.

wind

35 (with a maximum 46 mph gust) here, 17 up there on the ocean side, maybe even less on the bay side.

The storm should continue well into tomorrow.

storm

I sent this to Garden Tour Nancy, since her husband Phil frequents the jetty for fishing.

I sent this to Garden Tour Nancy, since her husband Phil frequents the jetty for fishing.  She replied that just yesterday he got drenched with a wave while standing on the highest rock.

All afternoon I did bulb spread sheets, till my brain thoroughly ached.  I thought you plant nuts might be interested in some of what I am planting in my own garden, some of each of the following:

Allium albopilosum, Allium schubertii, Camassia cusickii, Camassia leitchlinii alba, Crocus ‘Jeanne D’arc’, Crocus ‘Vanguard’, Lilies ‘Acapulco’,  ‘Beverly Dreams’,  ‘Orange Marmalade’.  I’m sure I also have some of the other tall alliums.  Definitely have 5 Allium ‘Forelock’ that did not make it onto my own spreadsheet.

Forelock

Allium Forelock, summer 2014

Narcissus ‘Felindre’,  ‘Kedron’,  ‘Lieke’,  ‘Martha Stewart’ (ordered because Lorna of Andersen’s is a big Martha fan, and now she has moved to Seattle so won’t see it), ‘Mint Julep’,  ‘New Baby’ (very excited about this new version of ‘Baby Moon!), ‘Pacific Coast’, ‘Pipit’, ‘Pueblo’,  ‘Rapture’, ‘Red Devon’,  ‘Surfside’, ‘Thalia Sun’ (new version of Thalia!!),  ‘Toto’,  ‘Tweety Bird’,  ‘Unsurpassable’, ‘Yazz’,  Narcissus poeticus recurvus (the poeticus are my favourites.)

Tulip ‘Antoinette’, ‘Exotic Emperor’,  ‘Fantasy’,  ‘Fire of Love’,  ‘Formosa’, ‘Green Wave’ (my favourite tulip),  ‘Madonna’, ‘Night Rider’, ‘Orange Princess’,  ‘Rococo’,  ‘Spring Green’, ‘Strong Gold’ (a great do-er for Long Beach planters),  ‘Virichic’, ‘White Parrot’, acuminata,  batalinii ‘Bright Gem’,  batalinii ‘Salmon Gem’, clusiana ‘Lady Jane’, dasystemon, kolpakowskiana, and praestans ‘Fuselier’.

And best of all, parrot tulip 'Green Wave', a very late bloomer

Best of all, parrot tulip ‘Green Wave’, a very late bloomer

Tulip 'Formosa'

Tulip ‘Formosa’, my second favourite, great combination of green flames and good and very late bloomer

Tulip 'Akebono'; note the thin red petal outline

Tulip ‘Akebono’; note the thin red petal outline

As I worked on this planter, passersby swooned over Tulip 'Akebono'.

As I worked on this planter last spring, passersby swooned over Tulip ‘Akebono’.  My third favourite tulip, and I completely forgot to order it this year, dang it!

I had picked up Fritillaria lutea and the orange one from Costco over a month ago; the orange ones had rotted in the bag by the time I got around to sorting bulbs.  I should have known, because fritillarias want to be planted immediately, not left to sit for a month waiting for the other bulbs to arrive for sorting.  So I just have the yellow one, lutea.

Some tulips that I adore but have not ordered for a couple of years, after a soggy spring made them look sad:

'Cool Crystal' (pink) and 'Sensual Touch' (orange)

‘Cool Crystal’ (pink) and ‘Sensual Touch’ (orange)

Tulip 'Cool Crystal'

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’; the fringes don’t do well in very rainy springtimes

in a planter: Tulip 'Sensual Touch'

in a planter: Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip 'Cummins'

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Next year I must remember to give the fringed ones another go.  I do adore them and it is worth the risk of them not doing well, because on a good year they make me so happy.

Meanwhile, Allan sorted through the used and re-used bulb bags from the planting we had done recently, to see what could be saved to reuse for next year, and to make sure we had not missed any bulbs.

a box to be sorted

a box to be sorted

after sorting

after sorting

He did such a useful thing this year, crossing off all my scribblings with a big black marker so that next year I don’t have to cross them off as I sort.

Despite the storm, we had dinner plans with our three gardening friends who drove all the way down from Oysterville.

The Cove Restaurant

and the weekly meeting of the North Beach Garden Gang (with us, Dave and Melissa, and Todd in attendance).

at The Cove

at The Cove

Allan's photo: perusing the menu

Allan’s photo: perusing the menu

pear and goat cheese salad

pear and goat cheese salad

Allan's noodle bowl

Allan’s noodle bowl

DSC01655

Melissa's halibut and our table by the fireplace

Melissa’s halibut and our table by the fireplace

after dinner

after dinner

Todd, the golf mascot,

Todd, the golf mascot, Dave, Melissa and me; the wind was blowing sheets of rain against the building and the parking lot looked like a lake.  Dave was ready to lead the way.

Tomorrow, the weather is supposed to be equally bad if not worse.  With all the spreadsheets done, I just might get a reading day at last.

 

 

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My rainy day off did not materialize in the morning. While the lazy side of me regrets that, the part that wants to be caught up on work was happy to get out there and get stuff done. So off we went to work despite a very cold and blustery wind.

I did take a brief moment to admire the front garden before leaving. That pointed bud of the peachy tulip just amazed me with its swirled petals. I wonder if it will ever actually open!

This might be 'Blushing Lady' single late tulip.

This might be ‘Blushing Lady’ single late tulip.

with bleeding heart

with bleeding heart

In Long Beach, I continued to admire tulips after we parked at the halfway mark of downtown and I went south while Allan went north to deadhead the planters and the street tree gardens. I also put some Mission Bells California poppy seeds in some empty tree garden spots.

This batch of parrot tulips looked especially good.

parrot buds

parrot buds

I have always disliked that sign on one of the shops that says “This shop is every husband’s nightmare” and find it interesting that the little red gift shop has the sign “My husband’s nightmare” with the word husband x’ed out so it reads “My nightmare.” Very odd indeed.

These will be spectacular if not damaged by wind and rain.

‘Apricot Parrot’ and “Rococo’: These will be spectacular if not damaged by wind and rain.

I stopped into the Home at the Beach shop to get some photos to use to promote the next Peninsula Cash Mob event and thought a reader might enjoy their perfectly beachy displays:

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Then…back out into the chilly wind to deadhead the planters in the next block.

This tulip would be wide open on a sunny day.

This tulip would be wide open on a sunny day.

yellow backed with yellow

yellow backed with yellow

Back at the Fifth Street quadrant of parks, the Darmera peltata bloomed next to the waterfall pond. Later it will have large leaves, but not as large as the gunnera.

Darmera peltata

Darmera peltata

One of the planters already has a good display of reseeded Cerinthe purpurascens, one of my three favourite annuals.

The colour comes from bracts as well as flowers.

The colour comes from bracts as well as flowers.

The Asphodeline that reliably returns each year in the planter right across from the one shown above always amuses me. I think it would be kicky to have more. They are not readily available; I got this one on a wonderful visit to Mesogeo nursery in 2007 and here it still is.

asphodel

asphodel on Fifth Street

A half block further north the ‘Cool Crystal’ and ‘Sensual Touch’ peony/fringed tulips testified to the restaurant behind that planter, The Hungry Harbor, being run by two very nice people. I wanted to give them an extra special planting which is why two of my most spectacular tulips live there.

Hungry Harbour:  The Gavota tulips are from last year.

Hungry Harbour: The Gavota tulips are from last year.

Hungry Harbour:  Tulip 'Cool Crystal'

 Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

'Cool Crystal' (pink) and 'Sensual Touch' (orange)

‘Cool Crystal’ (pink) and ‘Sensual Touch’ (orange)

The planter straight across the street is the one I think often of redoing. The azaleas look good now but will be blah all summer.

looking over the Hungry Harbour planter

looking over the Hungry Harbour planter

In the planter south of Hungry Harbour in front of the former Sand Dollar Deli (now Sweet McPhees….frozen yogurt perhaps?), I put some more ‘Cool Crystal’ and in this shadier planter it tones well with a purple Heuchera.

Heuchera and 'Cool Crystal'

Heuchera and ‘Cool Crystal’

That particular planter is one of my favourites for good perennial combinations: golden marjoram, the Heuchera, and a dusky cranesbill geranium that I acquired at Joy Creek Nursery.

a good planter

a good planter

Before we drove off, we went into a new shop called The Wooden Horse. It had been recommended to me by the owners of Home at the Beach and is a treasure trove of clever displays.

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse, just south of Frantic Fred’s!

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse

display cases made of pallets

display cases made of pallets

fencing

display shelves with old fencing

wooden horse

The Wooden Horse

wooden horse

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse

At the city works dump spot, while ridding ourselves of plant debris, we briefly sifted the top of the pile to see if we could find the perennial sunflower start we had lost two days ago. No, but we did find a lost hand tool, and I swear it was the one Allan was using. That makes up for my having left another pair of clippers behind at Golden Sands yesterday. (I know I will find them next time we go there.)

We had one more work stop to make for sure. We had brought a hydrangea for Crank’s Roost and although the weather was changing for the worse, I did not want to take it back home again. The dog Maddie greeted us.

Maddie..or Mattie.

Maddie..or Mattie.

A couple of years ago, one of a matched set of hydrangeas on either side of an arbour had mysteriously died. Ominously, so had a small replacement. Today we put in a replacement in hope of regaining balance.

asymmetry

asymmetry

satisfying symmetry

satisfying symmetry (if one grows to match the other)

I need to bring some Dr Earth rhododendron food to help out the old hydrangeas.

a sit spot

a sit spot

And as we left, a serious rain began. We did stop one block away to deadhead the narcissi at The Depot Restaurant.

The Depot

The Depot

I think this tulip is Yellow Mountain

I think this tulip is Yellow Mountain

the pink and green one is Virichic.

The pink and green one is Virichic.

The timing of the rain conveniently coincided with Judy wanting to meet me at 3 PM at Olde Towne. And I had gotten a message from owner Luanne suggesting that because of the rain, she hoped to see me there today.

To be warm, and meet friends, and have a delicious chai latte, and watch the rain blowing sideways outside was such a relief after battling the stiff wind in Long Beach.

Judy, Tom, Jenna

Judy, Tom, Jenna

Not only were the Hornbuckles there but also our dear friend Jenna of Queen La De Da’s so we had an excellent visit. And remember yesterday when I tempted Judy with a photo of a beautiful Japanese maple I’d seen at The Planter Box? This morning she bought not one, but three different maples (making a total in their small garden of 29?) AND she and Tom had already planted the little trees by the time we met for coffee.

Finally, after an hour at home where I got a head start on this blog entry, we went back out with our friend Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics to have dinner at The Depot. We arrived in late daylight, so I was glad I did not have to worry about deadheading tulips before dinner, and we almost closed down the restaurant like My Dinner with Andre.

late evening at The Depot

late evening at The Depot

So tomorrow, will I have a rainy day to relax and read the Tootlepedal blog? I don’t know what to hope for because it would be awfully nice to get the north end resort gardens done….

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We made our second visit to a brand new job today, a garden that is just a few blocks further down Lake Street.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

It is, in fact, our mayor’s garden.  I believe it was at least partly designed by Carol Jones, with whose “The Elves Did It” gardening business I shared some work in 2003.

Today was our second visit and I enjoyed working at Carol’s former job because all those years ago she had worked on some of my jobs and this made for an interesting switch.    One thing I feel the garden cried out for is some clumps of small narcissi.  There was not a one!

rhododendron

Carol liked gardens with clipped and tidy shrubs.  I must find out if Mike likes things a little looser, because I think the small square boxwoods should be allowed to size up a bit.

boxwood path

boxwood path

I found a circle garden around a tree in the less formal back yard area.

tree circle

tree circle

I spoke with a cute little dog through the lattice of the back porch.

shiny dog nose

shiny dog nose

Then we went to our longtime client Cheri’s garden.  Mike’s garden is conveniently located kitty corner across the street.  (We are so busy we would not have taken on a new garden had it not been so very handy.)

I wonder if two photos will tell the tale of  tulips with and without shotweed.

Cheri's front garden tulips before

Cheri’s front garden tulips before

and after weeding

and after weeding

I find it hard to tell the difference from the photos.

Cheri's narcissi

Cheri’s narcissi

I love those small cups.

I love those frilly small cups.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

Allan alerted me that as we packed up, Frank was watching us from the side window:

blue eyed Frank

blue eyed Frank

Frank among the clouds

Frank among the clouds

Frank among the clouds

Frank

Til next time, Frank..

And then at last it was time for my coffee klatsch with Patt and Judy…We had been bereft for a couple of weeks while Olde Towne was in the process of moving.

coffee/lunch hour with Patt, Judy, and Luanne!

coffee/lunch hour with Patt, Judy, and Luanne!

We were so pleased that after three bustling days, Luanne had time to sit with us for awhile.

During the two hours that I schmoozed with friends, Allan nobly weeded horsetail at the boatyard garden and took these photos to share the horror.

hideous large horsetail

hideous large horsetail

The large horsetail looks difficult but is actually easier to control than the finer, thin type (the latter being, unfortunately, the kind in my garden).

boatyard weeding progress...still two blocks to go.

boatyard weeding progress…still two blocks to go.

We both went on to work in Long Beach in the quiet evening.   Allan spent the time in the quadrant of parks on Fifth Street.   One of them has lots of the wild garlic, the same that we battled yesterday in Ann’s garden, and he removed enough so that it does not look like a grassy haze to the untutored eye.

Allan's project before

Allan’s project before…and a horsetail to boot!

There is no after photo to show you how much better it looked.

Meanwhile I had the more pleasant job of walking the ten blocks of street trees and planters, deadheading narcissi and tulips and pulling small weeds.   I’ll share some of the flower show with you, especially for Mr and Mrs. Tootlepedal, whose flowers in south Scotland are not as far along as ours.

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Narcissi with apricot cup

Narcissi with apricot cup

foreground:  Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'; background: Lewis and Clark

foreground: Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’; background: Lewis and Clark

the new bed at Veterans Field

the new bed at Veterans Field

Veteran's Field with white narcissi and blue and white violas

Veteran’s Field with white narcissi and blue and white violas

So far, the only red is from the foliage of a Barberry ‘Crimson Pygmy’, but the mission I have chosen to accept is to make the garden red white and blue for Loyalty Day (May 5th), when the field will be dedicated.  It will be my first ever red white and blue garden and if I do it closer to the day, I will have a better selection of plants.  One thing it will not be is red and white pelargoniums (annual geraniums) and blue lithodora.

The narrow border wraps partway around the circle.

The narrow border wraps partway around the circle.

After that half-block digression, I returned to the main street.

tulips

tulips and astible

street tree flowers

street tree flowers

I encountered my friend Heather from my favourite shop, Niva green, walking with her dog Tiny, and drew her attention to one of my favourite tulips.  Like the great botanist that I am I said “I really love the holdy thingie”….the way the flower looks cupped in a green hand.

Tulips

Tulips

Niva green

Niva green

I’ve planted green (viridflora) tulips in the planter by NIVA green…but of course an orange one has crept in from when the planter had tulips to tone with the building’s former colour: bright yellow.

leftover orange tulip

leftover orange tulip

I think these tulips that are just coming on might the the exciting new ‘Green Star’.

Green Star?

Green Star?

In a planter originally done back in the volunteer days by my friend Susie who owns the Boreas Inn, her red tulips are still coming back but with some of the flowers a bit smaller every year.

now

now

then

then

I walked a half a block west on Bolstadt to deadhead the narcissi at Long Beach city hall.

Tulip 'Leo' at city hall

Tulip ‘Leo’ at city hall

Pulmonaria at city hall

Pulmonaria at city hall

Tulips and Hebe, city hall

Tulips and Hebe, city hall

A lambs ear has reseeded itself next to a lamp post at Bolstadt and Ocean Beach Boulevard.

escapee

escapee

Back to the main drag…I see the Erysimum are doing well in the four whiskey barrels in Fish Alley.

Bowles Mauve

Bowles Mauve

in a planter: Tulip 'Sensual Touch'

in a planter: Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip 'Cut Crystal'

Tulip ‘Cut Crystal’

And finally, on the way to dump Allan’s park debris at city works, we just had to stop and deadhead the narcissi in Margaret’s garden on the way…

Margaret's narcissi

Margaret’s narcissi

Tomorrow: we must attend to several resort and business gardens and if we get lucky with time, we might get to check on the garden at Golden Sands Assisted Living which is rather worrying me as we have only been there once this year.

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