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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘Leo’’

 

Wednesday, 20 April 2016

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My Tulip ‘Leo’ at home.

It took me awhile at work to realize I had a big spot on my camera lens.

Red Barn Arena

Allan did a project with some edging blocks provided by Amy.

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before

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Using a curved beam for a straight edge

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Allan’s photo as he gathered tools to fill in a depression

I borrowed this wheelbarrow from the barn to wheel some soil from one area to another and fell in love with the handles.  There is none of that letting go and moving of one’s hands to a different position when dumping; one’s hands just slide around the loop.

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These work great!! Must find!

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almost done (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

While Allan worked, and when I ran out of weeds and deadheading and deadleafing of bulbs, I went next door to work on Diane and Larry’s garden.

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My good friend Misty (camera shy)

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Misty under the back porch

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Tulip ‘Green Star’

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lovely small cupped narcissi

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Stipa gigantea

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I do believe the stipa is blooming extra early this year.

Red Barn

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all done

Basket Case Greenhouse

Up Sandridge Road at the Basket Case, we got some plants for the next project.

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Me and Basket Case Nancy

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our good friend Shadow

Anchorage Cottages

Next project of the day: to plant up the new summer window boxes that Beth had built.  The window boxes with the early spring display of bulbs will be stashed behind the office for the summer and then put back out in winter.

Much to my delight, Beth has made two new sets of boxes, so that we don’t have to use the little plastic liners anymore.  They were too small.

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bulbs are going away

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The brackets will be replaced tomorrow.

The project was unexpectedly complicated by two things:  The brackets are going to be redone (as they are pretty awful), so we could not set the new boxes in place, and the other set of two window boxes still had tulips blooming, so we left for the weekend guests to enjoy.

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new boxes (Allan’s photo)

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We also redid two old terracotta planters into new green lightweight ones.  Our good friend Mitzu supervised.

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the variegated vinca had gone down through the planter hole and INTO the pavers.

I have totally gone off planting variegated vinca anywhere due its rampant behavior!

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after

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after

I salvaged the excellent Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ for the center, and used the violas and orange diascia which had been intended for the second set of windowboxes…and was very glad it worked out that way or I’d have been short of plants.  We left two newly planted window boxes in tones of blue flowers (to go with the blue sign) sitting on the patio to be installed when the new brackets are up.  I got to take home the old terracotta pots (with the tops falling apart, but still a good three fourths of the pot useable) to live out their last years in my garden.

Long Beach

Long Beach city hall and some planter deadheading and deadleafing finished out our work day.

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city hall, west side (Allan’s photo), Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and Tulip ‘Greenland’

The planters are in that awkward stage when there is lots of ugly dying bulb foliage and yet it is too early to plant most annuals.

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Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in a planter

Our friend Wendy walked by and told us she had found a little fairy door on one of the Bolstad approach planters.  We went to check it out.

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Allan’s photo

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someone’s brilliant gift to a planter! (Allan’s photo)

Allan realized later that the “flower pot” is a piece of broken beer bottle and pronounced it genius.

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beach lupine (Allan’s photo)

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an allium (?) emerging (Allan’s photo)

The Depot Restaurant

Because Allan had a social engagement on Thursday, we had our weekly dinner with Dave and Melissa tonight at burger night at the Depot Restaurant.  The day of projects had taken its toll on our energy, and the conversation kept us entertained and so distracted that neither Allan or I thought to take a photo of the tasty occasion.

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from the Depot website

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1998 (age 74):

April 20:  11:30-5:00!  warm  I finished planting all the berries.  After I put stuff away I found another flat of plants.  I added them to the last row.  I have worked 17 hours planting 11 wide rows of plants.  I replanted the onion plants that I dug out so that Ron could till that area.  After all the above I washed more than 30 trays.

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Saturday, 16 April 2016

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My Smokey

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looking debonair in his BirdsBeSafe collar

At last, a fine day at home to weed.  I spent hours on the center back yard bed, the most boring one to weed because it is all rather samey with its river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’.

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2 PM

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7 PM

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got a bit done on this bed, too…before…

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after

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Allan made delicious tuna fish toasties for lunch.

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a spectacular parrot tulip

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more tulips that have come back for the second or third year (or, the “black” ones, maybe five years)

While I weeded, Allan did me a large favour by digging out the big, dying pink flowering currant.

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Allan’s photos: before

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during

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I thought the roots would be rotting, based on the dying of the shrub, and that it would be easy to rock the stump out.  Not so.

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Human wins!

I want an evergreen shrub in this spot to “stop the eye”at the edge of the garden.

Allan mowed Nora’s (Alicia’s) lawn.

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many dandelions poked out and then ground up with the mower

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the back meadow wildlife refuge, with mown path to the port

Sunday, 17 April 2016

While Allan went grocery shopping across the river, I tackled the east side back garden bed.

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11:20  AM

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3:30 PM

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11:20 AM

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3:30 PM

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11:20 AM

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3:30 PM

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The back side did not get weeded along the edge.  I was still well pleased.

I had to stop at 3:30 and this is why; the weather was scorching hot:

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feels like 86! So very much too hot.

I had had a very big idea and had asked Allan to look for some bamboo screening that will “stop the eye” where the flowering currant came out.

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There is a gap in my plant screening now, and I like a cave like atmosphere.

We almost started to put up the screen.  With only half an hour before a social engagement, I had a feeling we did not have time.  The next day proved me right as it was quite difficult to install.

Our evening out involved touring two favourite gardens and that will be a separate post (or maybe even two).

Monday, 18 April 2016

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in the front garden, Tulip ‘Leo’ in bloom and bud

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Tulip ‘Leo’

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Smokey loves when I stay home.

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contentment

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Calvin

My mission was to get the west side back garden bed weeded, and to do my least favourite garden project: planting new plants.

Allan rassled two of the three new fifteen foot long bamboo screens into place.  (Fortunately for me and the garden, the tide was not good for boating this weekend.)

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before

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how he attached it (Allan’s photo); it was heavy and the slats wanted to slip down.

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Allan’s photo: It wasn’t easy.  He attached it on the Nora’s (Alicia’s) side.

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Allan’s photo; I wanted it high, and also wanted to be able to weed easily underneath.

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after….ahhhh….It should last a couple of years, at least.

In the great garden design book, The Inward Garden, Julie Moir Messervy writes about how we can look back to childhood to figure out what archetype of garden appeals to most.  Some people like a promontory, with an expansive view, and tend to clip down their shrubs in a way that I find utterly shocking.  I like a cave, an enclosed and private and secret space, and it bothers me a great deal when I can see out of the sides of the garden.  I do like to keep the view open at the south end of the garden in winter, to see the port buildings, so I don’t plant anything evergreen at that end.  It’s tricky to rely on shrubs to give me the sense of enclosure that I crave, because living things die.  I recall that Ann Lovejoy said something like the best privacy hedge is…a fence!

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Allan’s photo: I got some weeding done before I had to start PLANTING.

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Having to PLANT THINGS kept me from getting this area weeded.

I did get over half of my ladies in waiting planted.  What a relief.  Roses ‘Madame Alfred Carriere’ (what a shame her own name is buried), ‘Westerland’, and ‘Jude the Obscure’, many Nicotiana langsdorfii (to have sort of a theme among the onesies), two more Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ and a ‘Cardinal’ red twig dogwood and one of the two Stipa barbata and more…  I would rather have kept weeding, but the planting simply had to be done.

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stopped planting at 7 PM

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evening garden with moon

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a precious little iris

We were able to have a campfire for the first time this year.

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Allan’s photo

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view from the fire

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The second awesome section of bamboo that Allan had installed, and then he had mowed, too.

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pulmonaria and camassia (and weeds)

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I’d been looking forward to this dinner for a long time.

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Allan’s photo, second course

Oh how I wished for another day off to finish weeding the west bed.  Or a week off to get ALL the weeding done.  However, work calls tomorrow.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

My mother’s birthday was April 16th.

1995 (age 71):

April 17:  Bruce still sick and I have a cold, the first one since I started getting flu shots years ago.  Rec’d Foster Farms order all in excellent condition.  Only one broken.

April 18:  Drs appt (Bruce) and glucose test (me).

1998 (age 74):

April 16:  12:30-4:30  Worked 4 hours again on the strawberries and only got 3 rows.  It seems like I’m poking the plants in fast but it takes quite a while to plant these wide rows.  Al [her brother] called tonight and we chatted quite awhile  Skyler called, too. [It was mom’s 74th birthday.]

April 17:  11:30 to 4:30  5 hours today and still not finished.  I have 10 rows done and probably can finish tomorrow.  The berry plants in the two square trays are huge.  I think they are the first ones I dug from the rows by the asparagus.

April 18:  I worked on the strawberries 2 hours and got rained in.

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Friday, 3 April 2015

Today it was supposed to rain on and off all day, with winds of 20 mph.  In the morning, I heard heavy rain falling and went peaceably back to sleep.  At breakfast time, the air outside was chilly and the wind was whippy and I finally, finally got to settle down with one of my stack of library books.  I chose An Unknown Woman by Alice Koller, recommended in Writing from Life by Susan Wittig Albert.  And then…it got sort of nice out.  I went outside to check out the feel of the air.  It was workable.  Since by then it was about 1 PM, it seemed a bit late to go to work.  So I should weed in my own garden.  I visualized areas in the back yard that so need weeding and did not even walk back to look at them.  I pulled three shotweeds  in the front garden while taking photos.

Tulip 'Leo', a favourite, had returned!

Tulip ‘Leo’, a favourite, had returned!

I was thrilled to see it come back.  It has returned every year since 2011.

I was thrilled to see it come back. It has returned every year since 2011.

Just look at those petals!  I must try to find a source so I can buy this by the hundreds.

Just look at those petals! I must try to find a source so I can buy this by the hundreds.

I got Tulip 'Leo' from Colorblends, who did not carry it again as far as I know.

I got Tulip ‘Leo’ from Colorblends, who did not carry it again as far as I know.

Above it, Ribes speciosum

Above it, Ribes speciosum

Ribes speciosum has been blooming for weeks.

Ribes speciosum has been blooming for weeks.

front garden tulips

front garden tulips

front path and a garden calling out for some weeding

front path and a garden calling out for some weeding

Tulip 'Sensual Touch'

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

And I pondered whether climate change was going to rob me of all the many springtime rainy reading days that we used to get, and decided that rain or shine I was darn well going to read my book.  Yes, I felt guilty until the temperature dropped at 4 PM.  I observed that Allan also mostly stayed in doing computer “paper”work and then reading.  The next day he commented that Friday had been quite cold out.

Allan did better than I in that he got one small garden project done.  On February 6th, he had sent me a sunset photo that had led me to notice the amount of ivy on the trees along the meander line to our west (at the south edge of Nora’s back yard).

February 6th

February 6th

Today, remembering my comments, he went out and cut the ivy at the base.  It will die and then gradually loosen and fall from the tree.  You can find more information about ivy removal here.

April 3rd

April 3rd

In the late afternoon, I took one more look outside, not even leaving the front porch to photograph the first blooms on the rhododendron by Allan’s shed.  By then, the air had gotten decidedly chilly and I had no further active guilt as I finished my book (just some residual guilt about what I could have accomplished in the garden earlier in the day).  I soothed it just a little by making a new work board with the tasks that I need to accomplish at home.

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At about 2 AM, I looked out the window and saw the most amazing full moon above a cloud.  I hurried out to try to photograph it.  In just that time, it was behind the cloud.

sky

sky over the house with the light from Allan’s study

By the time I came in to tell Allan, the sky had gone all dark again.

For those readers who share my taste in memoirs, here are some takeaways from the book I read.  While reading her thoughts about how to make life more fulfilling, I was inspired to think that the perfect week for me would be four days of work (or three!), two days (or three!) of gardening at home, and one (or two!) full days of reading, plus two months of reading in winter.  Now how can I bring this about?

An Unknown Woman by Alice Koller

Since turning 45 or so, I have been fond of the genre that some might call navel-gazing.  May Sarton, Doris Grumbach, SARK, Dorothy Gilman’s A New Kind of Country, Simon Gray’s The Smoking Diaries, Mark Doty’s Still Life with Oysters and Lemons and Dog Years, and many more.  I have a board on Pinterest called Memories of Reflective Lives, with some of my favourites.  I will find an author who writes like this and will read all their works.  This past winter, Kate Llewellyn won my heart.  Today, when I had started Alice Koller’s An Unknown Woman, I could not put it down no matter how much my garden called to me.  As always, I will share some bits that especially spoke to me, without spoiling the narrative flow that leads to the author’s own revelations.

 Not everyone has the privilege of intense self reflection.  There have been many years when I was so busy working to pay my bills that I did not have time to figure out anything more important than how to keep working six days a week.

Alice Koller, at age 37, got a German Shepherd puppy and rented a house in the winter quietude and solitude of Nantucket, to reflect on how to change her life for the better.  She began by learning to not be as concerned by her outward appearance and by learning to recognize and choose what she wants to do…not that easy a thing.  (It has taken me since 2007 to implement, imperfectly, my own great revelation about work…)

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Even here on the Long Beach Peninsula, there are neighbourhoods of summer houses that have this feeling in winter:

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an introduction to small town life, when she picks up her mail:

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Much later, when passing a group of schoolgirls on the street, she has another encounter with small town life, one with which I strongly identify:

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She experiences her first coastal storm.  Now that I have lived at the beach for over 20 years, 50 mph seems like a mild storm indeed.  It doesn’t get terribly exciting till the wind is over 70.

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Calvin helped me read.

Calvin helped me read.

The passage below reminded me of a Saturday night in my life:

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Even though it was a time in my life when I went out to see bands a lot with Bryan, my significant other of five of my punk rock years, I was even then one to enjoy home comforts if there was not a particular draw to get me out the door.  One Saturday evening, I answered the doorbell to find my friend Molly and her S.O., all dressed up.  There I was in stay at home clothes and she looked at me, startled, and said “Aren’t you going out?  But it’s Saturday night!”  She was quite startled that we were staying in.

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One of Koller’s themes is her decision to tell the truth at almost all cost (tempered by the knowledge that one has to lie to keep a job, sometimes, unless one is as lucky in work choices as I am).  Because she trained to be an actress, this revelation is especially intense for her:

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Later:

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I found it helpful to read her thoughts about what gives her the most fulfillment, as I continue to try to sort out how to balance work and leisure.   Koller wants to choose a way of life that brings her “a sense of excitement, an immediacy worth perpetuating, a quality of fullness….That’s what ‘wanting’ will mean for me.”  “What things can I think of in the past year that carried that sense of fullness?”  (She makes a list.)  “Thirty items.  Thirty times in twelve months I’ve done things that I’ve found good in the doing.  That’s a ratio worth pondering.  Thirty times in fifty two weeks I was doing something I wanted to do.”

I am fortunate in that I figured out a career that lets me do pretty much just what I want to do most of the time.

Koller occasionally mentions how many people have told her she was beautiful, and mentions it again in this passage about believing what people say:

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Oh, but Alice, they absolutely DO tell “not beautiful” people “You’re not beautiful”, whether it’s a man yelling out “What a dog!” (has happened to me and to friends of mine) or people making fun of a fat person who is out for a walk, or …. Well, the examples could go on and on, including the stories I told in a recent blog post.  There is a good chapter on this subject in the book Reviving Ophelia.  I would like to tell Alice Koller that not being “beautiful” adds a whole ‘nother layer to self-examination and enlightenment and leads, I think, to more strength of character earlier on in life.  But, as usual, I digress.  Sometimes I think of starting a third blog just for thoughts like these (because I wrote a whole lot more and then deleted it).

Koller’s books abounds not just with reflection but also with puppy stories.  I especially loved this one about the puppy discovering snow, because it reminded me of puppy Mani over at The Miserable Gardener blog.

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Reflectiveness and puppydom make the perfect book subject combination.

A simple little revelation that I had one day is that life is short, and I could just about afford to buy good tea rather than the cheapest generic brand.

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I have just given you a glimpse into the beginning of Alice Koller’s transformation.  One reviewer complained that the book was too depressing because she considers suicide.  I would recommend it to anyone who is questioning whether or not staying alive is worthwhile, or anyone introverted, autistic, or of a solitary bent who has the misfortune of being judged as a less valuable being by more gregarious people.

A reviewer of her second book, Stations of Solitude, which I have eagerly ordered, wrote that “the problem with utopia, of course, is that once you get there, there is not much to do,”  as if somehow Alice Koller owes us more activity on her partAnother reviewer had the gall to question the value of the the “self” that she found.  Her choice not to teach or otherwise find a career use for her philosophy degree seemed to make her less valuable to these reviewers, and her choice to live her remaining life in solitude with her dogs seemed to make a few reviewers discount her writing.  I quested around the internet for information about her, finding her own sparsely worded website with its promise of a new book, and I decided she does not owe us the information that I so long for.  Where is she now?  Why do her friends call her “Timmie”?  Is Alice a pen name?  Is she even still alive? She was/is about my mother’s age so would be in her late 80s now. It is all a mystery because she had the gumption to actually live the life of solitude that she discovered was right for her.

By the way, for anyone who wonders how I can write about living in solitude when I actually live with Allan:  I came across a delightful article about Barbara Pym on the evening of the very same day that I read The Unknown Woman, with this to say about Pym’s “spinster” characters:

That word “spinster” is key to understanding Pym’s persistent and seemingly resurgent appeal. Critics often compare Pym to Jane Austen, but several people at the conference told me that they regard her novels as comfort reading precisely because they forsake Austen’s happy endings: her spinsters remain spinsters, and the breaking off of an engagement often produces more celebration than its announcement. (Pym herself never married, though she had many more affairs than her characters do.) The word is all over The Toast, meanwhile, its usage sometimes jokey but never derogatory. One of its regular advice columns, which answers readers’ problems with poetry recommendations, is called “The Spinster’s Almanac.” In an interview for The New Republic last year, Mallory Ortberg, the co-founder and editor of The Toast, said that she would “love for my next book to be a light comic novella called The Merry Spinster.” She added that “female solitude is a mental condition as well as a physical state. You can be married and a spinster.”

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Sunday, 6 April 2014

Today was the day we helped Jenna move her Queen La De Da shop from the Port of Ilwaco to downtown Ilwaco.  Fortunately, the start time was not till after noon, as I had been up into the small hours finishing yesterday’s novel, The Husband’s Secret.  I have now found out it was a New York Times best seller, a well deserved honour.

Smokey and Mary, when we departed.

Smokey and Mary, when we departed.

At noon, we went to Jenna’s new shop and potted up two trees to enhance her entry, and then dropped the extra potting soil back home again.

Not much had happened in cat land.

Not much had happened in cat land.

Drizzle would have kept me from gardening.  The garden did look grand in the soft light.

from the front gate

from the front gate

tulips in the front garden

tulips in the front garden (the fuzzy things on the soil are last year’s cardoon flowers)

pulsatilla 'Red Clock'

pulsatilla ‘Red Clock’

Tulip 'Leo', one of my favourites with its raggedy edge.

Tulip ‘Leo’, one of my favourites with its raggedy edge.

The young Bartlett pear tree in Allan’s garden has enough blossoms this year to evoke, with its sharp clean scent,  memories of the huge Bartlett tree in my Grandma’s garden.  I hope to live long enough to see it get this big:

pear tree from my back roof, Seattle 1989

pear tree from my back roof, “Gram’s garden”, Seattle 1989

The hellebores, still blooming, and someday to be under a pear tree’s shade, are fading to an interesting array of colours.

fade to black

fade to black

I’m hoping Allan will crawl under the old apple tree trunk behind that hellebore and pull all this shotweed and touch me not:

needs someone agile!

needs someone agile!

On to moving.  We started earlier than the rest of the friends so that Allan could dismantle Jenna’s big desk.  At one o clock, several others arrived.  I had the van almost loaded with handy same size cardboard moving boxes as other helpers went up and down the ramp into the Uhaul.

The owners of Heidi's Inn, Ilwaco, pitching in.

The owners of Heidi’s Inn, Ilwaco, pitching in.

unloading at Jenna's new shop on Spruce Street.

unloading at Jenna’s new shop on Spruce Street.  (The twisty tree is the one she wanted for her entrance.)

She’s losing the water view, but gaining lots more vehicle traffic, as everyone who drives through town from Astoria to Long Beach will pass her art gallery/studio.  It’s right across a small parking lot from the Antique Gallery, Too!   I took the opportunity to get some more photos for The Antique Gallery Facebook page.

Antique Gallery Too!

Antique Gallery Too!

inside Antique Gallery Too!

inside Antique Gallery Too!

While Allan reassembled Jenna’s desk (so large it had had to be dismantled for moving), I visited the Antique Gallery on Lake Street to talk with owner Robert about next Saturday’s cash mob.  If you are in town, you might attend our antiques extravaganza between the two Antique Gallery shops, the thrift store on Lake Street, and Olde Towne Trading Post Cafe, from 11-4 on Saturday, April 12.  I hope a good number of locals descend on the shops and spend at least a few dollars each.  (The Antique Gallery has the littlest  sea green glass floats for only $9.00 each.)

the little fishing floats are a good cash mob purchase...

the little fishing floats are a good cash mob purchase…

I pulled a few weeds from under the street trees while progressing from one shop to the other.

trees

By four thirty, I was home again, quite pooped.  I managed to take a few garden photos before sitting down to blog about Saturday’s events.

our garden boat

our garden boat

parrot tulips in the boat

‘Apricot Parrot’ tulips in the boat

more tulips in the back garden, bowed by rain

more tulips in the back garden, bowed by rain and wind

in the back garden

in the back garden

tulips backed with Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

tulips backed with Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

Backing up the photo a little bit gives the real story of the back garden:  I need to have a thorough weeding session for the thready little horsetail and the shotweed.

soon, I hope!

soon, I hope!

The shotweed is a satisfying weed to pull (as long as its seeds don’t shoot into my eyes).  The horsetail feels hopeless because one can never get all the roots.  If I were retired, I would be able to discourage it with constant removal.  (Ann Lovejoy says the best method is to break it off at the base rather than pull it.  I don’t have time for that in my life as it is now.)

Meanwhile, at the former shop of Queen La De Da, Allan helped return the hallway to its original blue paint.  The map of Ilwaco and its historic depiction of Tangly Cottage Gardening is no more!

We're in the lower left corner.

We were  in the lower left corner.

We were flattered to be on the map.

We were flattered to be on the map.

but there we go under dark blue paint...

but there we go under the dark blue paint that had coated the hallway when Jenna moved in…

We’re confident that Jenna’s new digs will have the same magic as the old shop.

 

 

 

 

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April 8, a walk round before work

front garden

front garden

front garden

front garden

tulips

tulips

Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing', front garden

Anthriscus sylvestris ‘Ravenswing’, front garden

tulip and bergenia

tulip and bergenia

tulips, front garden

tulips, front garden

Fritillaria meleagris alba

Fritillaria meleagris alba

Disporum 'Night Heron' in Allan's garden

Disporum ‘Night Heron’ in Allan’s garden

back garden, Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns' and horrible horsetail

back garden, Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ and horrible horsetail

The horsetail will be my next weeding focus.  You can see in the background that the neighbouring crab pots are still uncovered and picturesque.

back garden:  Santolina 'Lemon Fizz' wants to go green.

back garden: Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’ wants to go green.

I must find time to cut the green bits off this Lemon Fizz!

back garden: Euphorbia

back garden: Euphorbia

back garden: parrot tulips

back garden: parrot tulips

April 9 before work, a brief look at the front garden

Erythronium

Erythronium

tulips

tulips

Tulips 'White Parrot'

Tulips ‘White Parrot’

Tulip 'Leo'

Tulip ‘Leo’

Dicentra spectabilis alba

Dicentra spectabilis alba

ferns in Allan's garden

ferns in Allan’s garden

Then followed several work days so busy that there was no time to appreciate our own garden except quickly in passing.

April 14, day off

front garden

Arisarum proboscideum (mouse plant) in Allan's garden....flowers like mice diving into the ground

Arisarum proboscideum (mouse plant) in Allan’s garden….flowers like mice with tails!

Tulip 'Leo'...I only have a few of these...love them.

Tulip ‘Leo’…I only have a few of these…love them.

Tulip 'Leo'

Tulip ‘Leo’

a barberry with tiny flowers, from Cistus Nursery

a barberry with tiny flowers, from Cistus Nursery

detail:  hummingbirds love it

detail: hummingbirds love it

path, front garden east

path, front garden east

Tulip

Tulip

Disporum 'Night Heron' in Allan's garden

Disporum ‘Night Heron’ in Allan’s garden

Fatsia japonicia 'Spider's Web' in Allan's garden

Fatsia japonicia ‘Spider’s Web’ in Allan’s garden

Omphalodes 'Starry Eyes' in Allan's garden

Omphalodes ‘Starry Eyes’ in Allan’s garden

Tetrapanax papifer 'Steroidal Giant'

Tetrapanax papifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

back garden

ornamental rhubarb

ornamental rhubarb

ornamental rhubarb

ornamental rhubarb

into the bogsy wood

into the bogsy wood

bogsy wood path

 

scilla planted outside the bogsy wood fence

scilla planted outside the bogsy wood fence

meander line seasonal pond (south edge of property)

meander line seasonal pond (south edge of property)

hellebore

hellebore

Euphorbia and wallflower

Euphorbia and wallflower
looking southwest from patio

looking southwest from patio

Plant Vessel Ann Lovejoy

Plant Vessel Ann Lovejoy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I think that unless I get a weekday off, I will start saving the week’s photos (before and after work) of our garden for a Sunday update.  That may change if I start taking a different (or no) day off.

3 April

I found, on a real estate site, a photo of our house when it was for sale in 2010.  (I was checking comparable values and oddly, even though it is manufactured and thus depreciates, our house is holding more value than some historic houses on the street!)

early summer 2010

early summer 2010

I want to use this as the basis of a series of photos of the garden progress, but already had forgotten the photo angle to use when I took this:

3 April 2013

3 April 2013

front garden

front garden

front garden

front garden

tulips and cardoon

tulips and cardoon

a stunning yellow tulip

a stunning yellow tulip

6 April

First, a bunch of photos from right by where we park our car when we go to and from work.

the first Dutch iris

the first Dutch iris

Narcissi 'Merlin'

Narcissi ‘Merlin’

I love the very small cupped narcissi.  I also have realized this week that I love the apricot coloured cups on the ones that Nancy and Lorna picked out for their gardens.  I did not think I would.  Some of them are the ones that are supposed to be pink.  Next year I am going to order lots of them.

an Erysimum

an Erysimum

This Erythronium is precious to me because it came from my mother’s garden.

Erythronium (dogtooth violet)

Erythronium (dogtooth violet)

Fritillaria meleagris (checkered lily, guinea hen flower)

Fritillaria meleagris (checkered lily, guinea hen flower)

I am going to give a clump of the fritillaries to Judy.

In the back garden, the boat is coming on with tulips.  I put up a sweet pea tee pee around which I planted the ‘Alan Titchmarsh’ sweet peas that my friend Sheila kindly shared with me.  The wind has blown it over, but more wind is predicted for tonight so I will put it upright later.  I remember the optimistic moment when I put it in place earlier this week and thought “I don’t need to lash this to the boat because the big winds are over.”  No.

garden boat

garden boat

Later, that view would have included the two red gale warning flags flying over the Port Office.

My favourite ornamental grass, Stipa gigantea, is already putting out some fronds.  I have more than nine of them in the back garden.

Stipa gigantea backed with clean debris heap and crab pots

Stipa gigantea backed with clean debris heap and crab pots

Today

The day began with rain, so I started reading Mr. Tootlepedal’s Blog (April 2011).  Then out came the sun and I began to feel guilty, so after finishing the month of April in the borders (UK), I went outside with the intention of pulling one bucket of weeds, just one.  I soon came back in and started reading May, because my hands got so cold.  The sun peeked out again, and guilt drove me back outside, and then the rain came and I came back in to my reading.  Here’s what I saw in our garden today:

view from front porch while I pondered weather

view from front porch while I pondered weather

Hmm, Allan had a measuring tape next to his garden bed.

What is he up to?

What is he up to?

He is planning to make a new grid on which to record his plants (on paper) and has driven in screws a foot apart for future reference.

Allan's tidy garden

Allan’s tidy garden

I found a tragedy in my front garden bed:  a very precious and expensive Allium bud rotted off (and the one on the right looks iffy, like it might be rotting):

allium disaster

allium disaster

I love the emerging spears of Baptisia australis:

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

and white bleeding heart:

Dicentra spectabilis alba

Dicentra spectabilis alba

And the new leaves on Pieris:

Pieris  (My grandmother called it Andromeda)

Pieris (My grandmother called it Andromeda)

One of my favourite tulips, ‘Leo’, is coming back and a good thing too because I did not get any more of it.

left:  Tulip sylvestris on the way out, Tulip 'Leo' on the way in

two favourites:  (left) Tulip sylvestris on the way out, (right) Tulip ‘Leo’ on the way in

I like all the different cultivars of Muscari and try to add new ones every year.

Muscari latifolium

Muscari latifolium

But I was horrifed to see Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ making its way into the garden…and this photo is after I yanked half of it out.  I used to love it, but its extreme vigor has worn out its welcome.

that pesky hardy geranium

that pesky hardy geranium

But the rains came so I got back to my reading.  My achievement:  only 7/8 of a five gallon bucket of weeds pulled.

Speaking of wearing out one’s welcome, which I felt I was doing by stopping daily by Olde Towne café to photograph their progress in reopening in a new location, I am pleased to say that the news is that they are opening on Tuesday.  So the heart of Ilwaco is almost back.

Postscript:  Food

Reading the Tootlepedal blog often makes me crave tea and biscuits, and Mr. T. often writes of his friend Dropscone, a former baker who makes a delicacy called Drop Scones.  (Oddly enough.)   I forwarded the recipe to Allan (via email to the next room in the house) and he did try to make them.  They are similar to pancakes and did not look quite like Dropscone’s results but were tasty anyway.

first attempt at dropscones, served with Rose's lime marmalade

first attempt at dropscones, served with Rose’s lime marmalade

The next night, he made scones which turned out looking better, and tasted good, but the drop scones were just delicious.

Allan's scones

Allan’s scones

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