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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘Rococo’’

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

We were revived by our day off but were not ready to face the rest of the beach approach project. Today would be a day of smaller, easier jobs.

Next to the driveway as we left for work:

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tulips


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Narcissus ‘Chinita’

Port of Ilwaco

An event this Thursday at a port business inspired us to deadhead narcissi all along the Howerton Way gardens.  We won’t be attending but we expect it to draw a crowd.

pot

We want to make sure the gardens look nice for this business that watches out for flower jackers. (A few weeks ago, Allan got asked from the Freedom Market’s upstairs window what he was doing digging up plants in the garden. We appreciate that vigilance.)

We worked our way from east to west.

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east end, looking west


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The marina is across the east end parking lot.

 

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nautical trash

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The scrimmy little horsetails are not my mission today.


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CoHo Charters lavascape


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deadheads by the old Portside Café (Allan’s photo)


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by the Fort George Brewery office


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The old Shorebank building (now empty)


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kinnikinnick looking really quite nice and making one big buzzing bee happy


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Wax myrtle and arbutus that got the full windstorm blast from across the Shorebank parking lot…


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Another storm blasted wax myrtle

We will trim up those shrubs before the May 6th Children’s Parade and opening day of Saturday Market.  No time for that today.

Allan went on to deadhead the west end while I weeded between Shorebank and the Port Office, including the little garden on the south side of the port office building.  The tide was low…

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looking west


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Little brown birds scavenging the muddy rocks

Looking east, with lots of interesting driftwood

In the wheelie bin enclosure, I found a salvage piece which will be great to add to our fence.  Its little doors will provide a peekaboo effect.

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This went home with us.

 Interlude at home

As we parked in front of our fence, I thought about how interested I would be to see our garden as a passerby.

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I’d be looking over the fence for a better view.

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I remembered a few gardens in Seattle into which I used to peer through and over fences.

The cats had something to say about how we should stay home for the rest of the day.

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Smokey


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Skooter appears

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Frosty

Calvin, being not especially outdoorsy, doesn’t much care whether we stay home or not.

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Calvin woken from his usual daylong nap

The garden looked extra fine and tempting.

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tulips and cardoon


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Japanese maple (Allan’s photo)


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golden bleeding heart


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Tulip ‘Green Star’


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Ribes speciosum still in full flower


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Ribes speciosum and tulips


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patio tulips


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a lavishly fringed tulip (and Frosty saying, “Do stay!”)


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tempting

I have pretty good willpower about going to work (necessary for longterm self employment).  Off we went.

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Allan photographed this good old dog when we stopped at the bank to put a cheque in.

The Anchorage Cottages

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Beth and Mitzu (Allan’s photo)

We expected to just deadhead and weed.  However, Beth needed help with the climbing hydrangea which had fallen over in the recent big windstorm.

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They got it pushed back and well tied to the new trellis.

The wind was hard on a lot of the tulips in containers, especially in the office courtyard.  They fared better in the more protected center courtyard.

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center courtyard; an array of pots is just to the right


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some courtyard containers


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purple fringed tulips


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pink fringed tulip


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window boxes with tiny species flowers


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narcissi and unfurling sword fern

Long Beach

Next, we picked up from the city works yard as much Soil Energy Mulch as today’s buckets would carry.

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our mulch stash, with plants that were removed from a defunct planter

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Our first mission was to mulch the corner bed at Veterans Field.  Some sort of Veterans walk is beginning there later this week so we want it to look fluffy.

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Allan’s photos, before….


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during; an annoying and constant wind made the day cold.


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after

With that done, I went on a deadheading walkabout of the city planters and street tree gardens, while Allan went to weed and add some mulch in two areas of Fifth Street Park.

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He found this big lily bulb…


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a bright orange tulip


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and some annoyingly persistent horsetail

My photos while walking the planters:

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Tulip ‘Flaming Spring Green’

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foreground: parrot Tulip ‘Rococo’ in bud


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Tulip bakeri  ‘Lilac Wonder’


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bench sitter

Reminder to self: Put “dig out planter ivy” on the work board so I will remember it.

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horrible variegated ivy.  I blame myself from many years ago.


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exciting bud on Asphodeline


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orange tulips


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and a painted rock placed by California poppies that might be orange later on!


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pink fringed tulip, and progress on defunct planter (the lamp post has now been removed)


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some big tulips, windblown, chomped by deer, broken, or picked


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In the same planter, Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ have been blooming for weeks.

Note to self: plant many more ‘Lilac Wonder’.  They are my favourite species tulip and they do so well here.

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Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

I was awfully tired for the last two blocks of deadheading and figured as soon as we got home, I would sit down.

at home

At home, I took four buckets of deadheads out to the compost bins while Allan (almost always a man of boundless evening energy) set to mowing the lawn.

The compost bins inspired some compost turning.  A day of varied jobs is much less exhausting than an all day, same place weeding project.

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I had gotten all excited when seeing the bottom of bin B:

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It looked like it might be siftable!

It wasn’t.  But soon will be if I keep turning frequently.

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bins after today’s turning

I need more green stuff before flipping another layer.

While Allan also mowed the next door lawn for our next door neighbour, I checked the hydrangeas over at the J’s garden for signs of life.  The twigs are green when snapped but still no leaves, not even at the base.

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good looking sword ferns at the J’s

Back at home, a stunning narcissus with a deep green center (and tiny spider):

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I got a bit of a start when I thought each leaf of my Davidia tree had a snail in it.  No, those are flowers buds

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Not like the horrible snails everywhere in my garden due to lack of time to properly police them.

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Allan’s photo

Tomorrow, yet another storm is due.  I look forward to reading a book.

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Wednesday, 6 April 2016

As I was preparing to go to work, I saw a bunch of shifty looking characters hanging over the front fence looking at the garden.  Oh!  It was our friends Steve and John! and Betsy Millard, director of the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, and other members of the Community Historian group, heading down the street to look at the historic Colbert House.

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with Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’ in foreground

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John and Steve

I waylaid Steve and John and dragged them into the garden, with continual apologies regarding how far behind they had fallen on the historic walk.

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Smokey says hi.

I apologize to Betsy for interrupting the tour and I do hope Steve and John did not miss too much of it.

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The historic Colbert House at Lake Street and Quaker Avenue.

Long Beach

The annual Clam Festival takes place this weekend.  Therefore, we deadheaded and groomed some street trees and planters.

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Allan’s photo of a narcissi coming up through a “plant washer”…a washer someone had dropped in a planter.

Allan weeded in Veterans Field, the main location for the outdoor part of the Clam Festival.

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Allan’s photo, Vet Field garden

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Allan’s photo, anemones

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While grooming the nearby garden by Kabob Cottage, Allan found this froggie.

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planter by the police station (Allan’s photo)

While Allan weeded, I checked on another block of planters.

There was the usual amount of annoying Spring Break finger blight.

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here, a blossom…

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and further on, a stem…

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…of what would have been a beautiful Dutch Iris.

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This is deer, not human, damage, with tulips nipped off…

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and even pulled right out.

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Beautiful Tulip ‘Rococo’ on one side of a planter.

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smashed flat by standing? or sitting? on the other side of the planter.  Damn it!

Me, to a male tourist by Funland: “Sir, I have to work on these planters, would you please not spit in them?”  He apologized, abashed.  Why, why, why, must some of the menfolk spit?

Some good things:

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a glorious fringed tulip

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Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

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Tulips ‘Virichic’ and ‘Exotic Emperor’

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Tulip ‘Exotic Emperor’

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Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and ‘Exotic Emperor’

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Tulip ‘Formosa’, which USED to always bloom in May.

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Tulip ‘Rococo’, also used to bloom in May, but has been early last year and this year.

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Tulip ‘Rococo’

beach approach

Where we left off last time before being interrupted by bad weather:

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I had been optimistic about having finished 2/3 of our more recent section.  Nope.  We’d done more like 1/2  before getting rained out on Sunday.

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before (Allan’s photo)

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before

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before

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Allan’s photo

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passersby (long telephoto by Allan)

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after, including the short end cap that we did weeks ago.

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sidewalk tile by Renee O’Connor

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lots of passersby today (and some Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’ added to a planter (Allan’s photo)

I got to pet a four month old puppy and to admire a gorgeous Weimaraner.  Allan saw a funny doggie sight:

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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after (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

We deliberately left some shaped clumps of clover, for the bees.  I heard a passerby say to her child as I weeded, “They’re taking all that clover out.”  Not quite all, and I do wonder if people will view it as just weedy.

We got done with the section left over from Sunday and were able to embark upon just a bit of the penultimate section.

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Yay, we are about to cross the driveway!

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section 11 of 12.5 (The .5 is already done.)  Before (Allan’s photo)

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The buoy is our goal.  (Allan’s photo)

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digging with the ho-mi (Korean hand plow)

I said we would stop at six.  At six, I wanted to continue, and felt happy when Allan kept weeding.  I said “I could go till seven”.  Then I stopped for just a moment and all of a sudden I could quite simply do no more.

We got this far:

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Allan’s photo

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an early (6:30 PM) end to the day due to my running out of steam.

At least that is a head start on tomorrow, when I hope, oh so fervently hope that we can get this section done to the planter and the next section done to the end.  That will be a challenge.

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We have this far to go.

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We have come this far since we began at the arch days ago.

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What remains might be impossible in one day. (Allan’s photo)

I can dream.

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We are this far.

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Using a scarf to haul my locked-straight knee into the van.  Dang, that hurts.

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I long to erase “beach approach” tomorrow.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 70):

April 6:  Bruce took down the two 3-tier baskets.  I added more plants from the Floralight [3 shelf plant gro light table].

1998 (age 73):

April 6: Again I was determined to finish the strawberries and I did.  I have 24 flats of plants and each one must have about 50 plants.  I even dug up the 1 1/2 rows that I had interplanted with new plants.  They needed dividing so I took them up.  Now the entire garden can be filled on Sat.  I also pulled the multiplier onions and put them on a flat.

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Friday, 17 April 2015

The day was miserable in spots for just three reasons:  25 mph mighty cold wind, too much to do, and like a doofus I was too frazzled in the morning to take my new green wheelie cart to Long Beach (an omission I would regret later).  The vehicle had lots of Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ and other plants and we had not yet figured out a system for taking the wheelie to Long Beach.  We will have it figured out by next time!

Ilwaco

at the Post Office, a creamy California poppy in bloom

at the Post Office, a creamy California poppy in bloom

Our first task was to see if the two planters city planters had been moved from semi-hidden locations to more visible spots on Spruce street.  Well, they were, BUT the one at the fire station was one of the ones moved, after I had told fire chief Tommy yesterday that it wouldn’t be moved, and the one hidden by other planters next to a café had been left unmoved.  A stop at city hall got it sorted; the one by the café will be moved to the fire station in a complicated dance of musical planters.

We put some violas and golden variegated thyme in the two newly placed planters, along with a Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’, and will add more plants next week.

Allan by one of the newly positioned planters.  Sadly, the owner of the English Pub passed away some years ago and the building is for sale.

Allan by one of the newly positioned planters. Sadly, the owner of the English Pub passed away some years ago and the historic  building is for sale.

We then swung around to town to do the rest of the planters, starting with the boatyard intersection.

boat

See the little bit of yellow at the edge of the garden?  That is Limnanthes douglasii, also known as fried egg plant.

also known as meadow foam

also known as meadow foam

Narcissus bulbocodium 'Golden Bells' (Yellow Hoop Petticoats) in a planter.

Narcissus bulbocodium ‘Golden Bells’ (Yellow Hoop Petticoats) in a planter.

same planter as above at First and Eagle

same planter as above at First and Eagle, with Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’, golden oregano, and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

After over an hour working on the Ilwaco planters, adding some violas and thyme, and in one case digging out some too-large narcissi, we went on to Long Beach.

Long Beach

Allan weeding and deadheading the welcome sign

Allan weeding and deadheading the welcome sign

front of welcome sign

front of welcome sign

front

I'm most pleased with the back side of the sign.

I’m most pleased with the back side of the sign.

Thank you for visiting Long Beach, with tulips complementary to blue.

Thank you for visiting Long Beach, with tulips complementary to the colour blue.

Next stop: Veterans Field, which will be the main gathering place for the Clam Festival tomorrow (April 18th; this blog is running about six days behind).  We won’t be going this year as I have home gardening to do and Allan has some motorcycling to do.  You can read about our enjoyment of last year’s festival here.

The city crew was getting the tent with the giant frying pan set up (not the same pan that is mounted in Fifth Street Park).

The city crew was getting the tent with the giant frying pan set up (not the same pan that is mounted in Fifth Street Park).

LB Parks Manager Mike Kitzman

LB Parks Manager Mike Kitzman

Allan planted five Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ at the back of the corner garden.  

 Sky Pencil stays elegantly columnar.

After a thorough grooming of both of the Veterans Field gardens and the adjacent park behind Lewis and Clark Square, we headed for the Sid Snyder beach approach.  On the way, we paused to drop off a gardening bill to the Oman Builders Supply Long Beach store (for our work at their branch in Ocean Park.  Outside, I almost got caught by a little scam.  One of four high school age kids asked me if I would buy a book of coupons for $1.  The local high school has offered such books before.  I first said no, because the coupon books rarely have anything that we would use, then decided to be a good citizen and said yes and handed him a dollar.  As they walked away, I looked at what the kid had handed me and pursued them right into Oman and Son and said, “Hey, you’re just pan-handling; give me my dollar back.”  Which he did, looking only faintly embarrassed.  I realized they were spring breakers from somewhere else!

It was just an old newspaper insert that had probably been blowing down the street! (We found another one blowing down the beach approach road later on.)

It was just an old newspaper insert that had probably been blowing down the street! (We found another one blowing down the beach approach road later on.)

That was interesting.

Onward we went, weeding and deadheading the planters and the kite museum garden (fertilized it!) on Sid Snyder Drive and then the Bolstadt beach approach planters.

Sid Snyder and Bolstadt Beach Approach roads

Sid Snyder and Bolstadt Beach Approach roads

satellite view of beach approach roads

satellite view of beach approach roads

Allan's photo: one of the Sid Snyder planters with lots of California poppies coming on

Allan’s photo: one of the Sid Snyder planters with lots of California poppies coming on

Allan's photo:  Two trail ride outfits are located along Sid Snyder.  Here, a group is heading to the beach.

Allan’s photo: Two trail ride outfits are located along Sid Snyder. Here, a group is heading to the beach.

me waiting for Allan by our last planter on Sid Snyder

me waiting for Allan by our last planter on Sid Snyder

weeding the westernmost planter on Bolstadt beach approach  (Allan's photo)

weeding the westernmost planter on Bolstadt beach approach (Allan’s photo)

Sedums are good here as these get very little water.

Sedums are good here as these get very little water. (Allan’s photo)

Allan weeding one of the western Bolstadt planters

Allan weeding one of the western Bolstadt planters

The west end of the beach approach garden

past the west end of the beach approach garden (looking east toward town)

rosemary in one of the planters

rosemary in one of the planters

That rosemary and the heather harken back to my friend Lily Gibson, who died in 2004 in her early fifties of ALS.  Before that, she had taken on two of the volunteer planters on the beach approach and won the prize for best planter.  She would drive out with her three little dogs every day and water it, and took such good constant care that she even had blue lobelia thriving around the edges.  (We only water these planters on occasion; last year the city crew watered them once a week in summer.)  I planted the lilies in Fifth Street Park and at City Hall with Lily in mind.

To check on the planters, I walked east along the weedy beach approach.  We don’t have time in our schedule to do anything about it yet.

weeds!

weeds!

City Hall, looking west

City Hall, looking west, with the Chinook flag flying

The wind was getting worse, and colder.  I checked 642 weather (26 mile an hour gusts) and my Wind Alert app.

Wind Alert

Wind Alert

I put an another flannel shirt and my jacket (difficult in the flapping wind) and gave myself the Deadliest Catch pep talk: “It could be worse.  I could be crab fishing on the Bering Sea.”  (Of course, we don’t make $50,000 in a few weeks, either.)

Deep purple bases on emerging hostas on the east side of city hall.

Deep purple on emerging hostas on the east side of city hall.

north side of city hall

north side of city hall

The memorial marker is worn.

The memorial marker is worn.

This hellebore has been looking good for months.

This hellebore has been looking good for months.

City Hall west side

City Hall west side

After dumping our debris at City Works, we took an intermission from Long Beach to check up on the garden at…

The Anchorage Cottages

Narcissus 'Baby Moon' still blooming in the windowboxes..

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ still blooming in the windowboxes..

...along with Tulip batalinii 'Bright Gem'

…along with Tulip batalinii ‘Bright Gem’

center courtyard

center courtyard

the bearded iris that got half broken off last week

the bearded iris that got half broken off last week

Camassia

Camassia

Tulip 'Angelique' by the office

Tulip ‘Angelique’ by the office

sweet peas and a new application of Sluggo by the chimney

sweet peas!! and a new application of Sluggo by the chimney

After the most basic of deadheading and weeding and the planting of two dahlias, we returned 20 blocks south to groom all the street planters in Long Beach.  By now it was 4:30 PM.

Long Beach Planters walkabout

For two and half hours, with me feeling increasing soreness from carrying a heavy bucket, we did the Long Beach planters.  We did the two north blocks together, then split up and each took half of the rest of them.  I swear I will not do the bucket carrying again; next time I WILL get organized and take the green wheelie cart that Mary Beth gave me!  (We need to organize a way to lash it into the trailer; that will be easy for Allan.)

just north of Dennis Co....The mermaids will be at the Depot building for clam festival.

just north of Dennis Co….The mermaids will be at the Depot building for clam festival photo opportunities.

Here they were last year, photo courtesy Queen La De Da's

Here they were last year, photo courtesy Queen La De Da’s

Tulip 'Rococo' at 3rd N and Pacific

Tulip ‘Rococo’ at 3rd N and Pacific

me striving for perfection with Coulter Park in the background

me capturing the picture above with Coulter Park in the background (Allan’s photo, zoomed)

more 'Bright Gem' tulips

more ‘Bright Gem’ tulips

2nd N and Pacific...I SO hope to get this vinca-heavy planter redone this spring!

2nd N and Pacific…I SO hope to get this vinca-heavy planter redone this spring!

variegated euonymous and tulip (Allan's photo)

variegated euonymous and tulip (Allan’s photo)

Baby Moon and Tulip 'Bright Gem' (Allan's photo)

Narcissus Baby Moon and Tulip ‘Bright Gem’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Green Wave' next to Scoopers ice cream shop.

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ next to Scoopers ice cream shop, blown by the wind

Tulip 'Green Star' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

The wind was tormenting me, so when I got across the street (I was criss crossing back and forth) I went into NIVA green for a moment of respite.

niva

Tulip 'Green Wave' in bud

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in bud

window display

window display

Heather Ramsay's newest lamp, from a Peek Frean tin

Heather Ramsay’s newest lamp, from a Peek Frean tin

one of several gardening books on display

one of several gardening books on display

The pond at Bolstadt and Pacific

The pond at Bolstadt and Pacific

When I went into the Long Beach Pharmacy for a quick purchase, I saw some cute garden decor items:

faucet with crystal raindrops

faucet with crystal raindrops

“Sometimes the tiniest flowers smell the sweetest.”

another faucet with crystal water drop and a fairy door

another faucet with crystal water drop and a fairy door

Back to work!  In front of Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop, this planter is due for a clean out of aster that goes back to volunteer days.

For a few years, the aster was polite; now it is on the run all over the planter.

For a few years, the aster (by the lamp post) was polite; now it is on the run all over the planter.

I did not expect the wire plant to be so vigourous; may have to do something about that, too.

I did not expect the wire plant to be so vigourous; may have to do something about that, too.

in front of the Cottage Bakery: reseeded Cerinthe major purpurascens

in front of the Cottage Bakery: reseeded Cerinthe major purpurascens

sparaxis!  wish I had lots more of this darling bulb, which is blooming early this year.

sparaxis! wish I had lots more of this darling bulb, which is blooming early this year.

Sparaxis

Sparaxis

Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

more cerinthe

more cerinthe

looking south, still two block to go to meet up with Allan, who is doing the southern two blocks

looking south, still two block to go to meet up with Allan, who is doing the southern two blocks

Delightfully, the wind had died down just a bit, as you can see from the less intense angle of the flags as I passed by Veterans Field again.

not quite straight out.  Still a north wind, the coldest one.

not quite straight out. Still a north wind, the coldest one.

As I worked on this planter, passersby swooned over Tulip 'Akebono'.

As I worked on this planter, passersby swooned over Tulip ‘Akebono’.

Lewis and Clark Square and Veterans Field

Lewis and Clark Square and Veterans Field

by Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

by Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Rococo' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Rococo’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Rococo', lavender, and a Tulip 'Black Hero' that returned from a few years ago

Tulip ‘Rococo’, lavender, and a Tulip ‘Black Hero’ that returned from a few years ago (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Florette' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Florette’ (Allan’s photo)

The multiflowering tulip ‘Florette’ has been fantastic this year.  I’m going to plant more of this type next fall.

Tulip 'Florette'

Tulip ‘Florette’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo...I must ask him where this was!  The original name of Long Beach was Tinkerville.  The old Tinker house is just west of our friend and client Jo's house.

Allan’s photo…I must ask him where this was! The original name of Long Beach was Tinkerville. The old Tinker house is just west of our friend and client Jo’s house.

(The photo was taken at First Place Mall and the shop is a new art consignment store.)

by the bus stop

I can tell by this photo that Allan had turned at the southernmost planter and was working his way north again. Tulip ‘Apricot Parrot’, almost over.

Allan also did the final grooming of the Fifth Street Park gardens, where we had weeded extensively three days before.

Allan also did the final grooming of the Fifth Street Park gardens, where we had weeded extensively three days before.

Finally he caught up to me, where I was plucking maddening little grasses from the planter in front of the Hungry Harbor Grille....with the cold wind on my last nerve.

Finally he caught up to me, where I was plucking maddening little grasses from the planter in front of the Hungry Harbor Grille….with the cold wind on my last nerve.

By 7 PM, Allan and I had met up.  I was so deeply glad to be done.  We dug deep and managed to groom the Ilwaco Post Office and plant two dahlias there on the way home.

My cat family had been watching me from the window as I carried plants to the holding area.

My cat family had been watching me from the window as I carried plants to the holding area.

I am taking three days off, I HOPE.  The little chair and table that I arranged for a sit spot are not going to be sittable until I get these plants organized and planted, and a lot of them go here,

weeding and planting at home await me.

weeding and planting at home await me.

As we did the evening sorting out of the van, the sun was a huge red ball on the horizon at the end of the street.

As we did the evening sorting out of the van, the sun was a huge red ball on the horizon at the end of the street.

At midnight, after some blogging, some dinner, and The Amazing Race on telly, Mary snoozes while I finish this blog entry.  (Allan's photo)

At midnight, after some blogging, some dinner, and The Amazing Race on telly, Mary snoozes while I finish this blog entry. (Allan’s photo)

Allan said that the sight of a cat on the back of each chair reminded him of photos of three mountains lined up.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Monday, 30 March 2015

March 30 was my Grandma’s birthday.  She was my caregiver, mentor, friend, inspiration, and not a day goes by that I don’t think of her.  I made a post about it on Facebook:

Gram

You can read about her garden (which later became mine), here.

So….today….I had thought that we might perhaps take the day off so that I could do more weeding at home.  However, the dreaded task of mulching the Golden Sands garden weighed heavily upon my mind, and Allan said he thought it was on the agenda for today so…we did it.

Tulips in our garden at the Ilwaco Post Office

Tulips in our garden at the Ilwaco Post Office

Tulip 'Virichic'

Tulip ‘Virichic’ and one other at the Ilwaco Post Office

Peninsula Landscape Supply

coming in for some Soil Energy (Allan's photo)

coming in for some Soil Energy (Allan’s photo)

getting a yard of Soil Energy at Peninsula Landscape Supply

getting a yard of Soil Energy at Peninsula Landscape Supply

It was a generous pour.

It was a generous pour.

The pile is new, and somewhat hot.  We watered it down when we used it at the Port of Ilwaco office garden.  Today, in a layer on the Golden Sands garden, it would not be too hot.  But don’t ever plant straight into pure hot mulch; let it cool for a day or two.  One of the other bulk items sold by Peninsula Landscape Supply is hemlock bark; if I were to apply any sort of bark it would be this, because it is brown rather than red.

IMG_7039

an appealing colour

I'm also a fan of their three sizes of river rock.

I’m also a fan of their three sizes of river rock.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

We drove slowly to Golden Sands as the yard of Soil Energy had been such a generous pour.  I wanted a photo to show how we park by the door at the SW corner of the assisted living center because it is a closer trip to the garden courtyard door.  Allan looks like he is saying something grumpy, but he isn’t.  Behind him is a mowed airplane runway which is rarely if ever used but is kept mowed apparently just in case an emergency landing is needed by a small plane.  We had already had some excitement on the job.  To access this particular door, I have to ask a staff member to open it from the inside, and this time the alarm sounded so there had been a lot of hustling about to get it turned off before anyone got anxious.

heading for the now unlocked fire door

heading for the now unlocked fire door

We had the small red wheelbarrow and the big grey one in play.  I would stay in the courtyard weeding and spreading the mulch while Allan brought it.  (Fortunately it was dry and thus very lightweight.)

“Soil energy combines composted wood products, aged screened sawdust, screened sand, composted chicken manure, lime, fertilizer and iron. (pH 6.2, brown tan in color, 38.9% organic matter).”

To get to the courtyard, we must wheelbarrow down half a long carpeted hallway.  If we came in the front door, as we usually do, the hallway trip would be three times longer.

Allan's photo: I took in one wheelbarrow but couldn't open the courtyard door and also push the barrow through it.

Allan’s photo: I took in one wheelbarrow but couldn’t open the courtyard door and also push the barrow through it.

hall

Allan almost to the courtyard door.

I always think of this suspense book that is in my collection.

I always think of this young adult suspense book that is in my collection.

Backing out the door into the courtyard.  This door is heavy and won't prop open.

Backing out the door into the courtyard. This door is heavy and won’t prop open.

Google Earth of the building surrounding the courtyard.

Google Earth of the building surrounding the courtyard.

We started with the NW quadrant, the one where last time we brought mulch, we ran out partway through.

NW quadrant, just getting started.

NW quadrant, just getting started.

after, all nicey nice at last

after, all nicey nice at last

Next, my mom’s old garden.  This whole project of turning rough patches of weedy lawn into four garden beds began when she moved into assisted living in autumn of 2009.

"Mom's garden", the NE quadrant, before

“Mom’s garden”, the NE quadrant, before

After the mulch was all down, I planted seeds of California and Shirley and assorted other poppies.  I planted lots of ‘Copper Pot’ California poppies in mom’s quadrant, because she loved copper and collected decorative copper items.

NE quadrant, after...

NE quadrant, after…My mother lived in the room with the center window.

I felt a little verklempt while planting the seeds.

I felt a little verklempt while planting the seeds.

The beds at the south end of the courtyard did not need as much mulch.  There is never quite enough to fully cover all four beds, and they had gotten the most last time.

SE bed before

SE bed before

and after.

and after.

I had to lift and gently replant a peony from Mary Beth as you cannot put too much soil on a peony or it won’t bloom; I hope it doesn’t mind.

SW quadrant before

SW quadrant before

SW after

SW after

The beds have a lot of vigorous plants…too vigorous sometimes.  .  It started as a purely volunteer project so I was using whatever plants (within reason) that I could get for free (and then it turned into a paid job with “grandma rates”, i.e. we give a discount in honour of the elder residents).  Yellow Lysimachia punctata, some running yarrow,  and probably too many Sweet Williams are in the garden beds.  The bad aster is also in there, one plant that I most decidedly did not bring in.  Another that I would never have planted is the terribly invasive lily of the valley, and I found a few sprouts of it today and eliminated them post haste.  So with all those vigorous plants, it’s hard to find spots to add seeds.  I did my best.

It felt grand to have the job done at last.  I don’t quite know why I dread it so much, since Allan does the hallway wheelbarrowing.  I think it is because I like to come and go without any fuss, and having to go to the desk and ask to have the door unlocked, and then worrying about getting the carpet dirty are both things I fret about, just a bit.

We had time to do some work in Long Beach in the late afternoon.

Long Beach

We started by getting 13 buckets of mulch from our pile at city works.  I returned a fortuitously timed phone call from Todd, who was asking about some plants at the Wiegardt Gallery garden, which is now his job.  So Allan scooped all the soil into the buckets on his own while I mentally walked with Todd through the Wiegardt garden.  Thanks, Todd, that was a well timed conversation.

I had two red flowering plants, a Penstemon and a Monarda, to plant in the new Veterans Field bed.  There are enough plants in it now to cross “plant memorial bed” off the work list, although I will still be on the lookout for a few more red, white, or blue plants.  Right next to the new garden is some asphalt with horsetail coming through it, and I see a sprout or two in the garden so I fear it will become a weeding chore.

accursed horsetail right next to the garden

accursed horsetail right next to the garden

Tulip 'Rococo' in the garden

Tulip ‘Rococo’ in the garden

Tulip 'Peppermint Stick'

Tulip ‘Peppermint Stick’

inside 'Peppermint Stick

inside ‘Peppermint Stick

'Peppermint Stick' has cunningly wavy foliage.

‘Peppermint Stick’ has cunningly wavy foliage.

a small cupped narcissi

a small cupped narcissi

I love the small cupped kinds.

I love the small cupped kinds.

I can usually count on Tulip ‘Rococo’ to be in bloom for the city parade the first Sunday in May.  THIS year, it is blooming before the end of March.

'Rococo' and many other late flowering tulips are early this year.

‘Rococo’ and many other late flowering tulips are early this year.

I planted a few remaining seeds of California Poppy ‘Ivory Castle’.  Meanwhile, Allan was weeding the curved bed by the flag pavilion.  I joined him weeding, then mulching.

before

before

after

after

Here’s a funny thing: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ has reseeded itself with about five new very welcome plants.  But the foliage is different.

Sapphire Blue sea holly has serrated leaves (not brushed off yet)...

Sapphire Blue sea holly has serrated leaves (not brushed off yet)…

The seedling leaves a bigger and plainer. As long as they are Eryngiums, they are fine by me.

The seedling leaves a bigger and plainer. As long as they are Eryngiums, they are fine by me.

I planted a few more California Poppy 'Red Chief' and 'Carmine King'.

I planted a few more California Poppy ‘Red Chief’ and ‘Carmine King’.

all nicely mulched

all nicely mulched

Allan uses a broom to sweep dirt off leaves and level the mulch.

Allan uses a broom to sweep dirt off leaves and level the mulch.

We had one more project in Long Beach: to plant assorted California and Shirley poppies in the big pop out which Allan had finished weeding while I was at Sylvia Beach Hotel.

now full of seeds, and some lily and dutch iris bulbs

now full of seeds, and some lily and dutch iris bulbs

The job was slightly miserable as a 20 mph wind had come up.  Who will win, the rugusa rose roots still lurking or the poppy seeds and lilies?

Allan's photo trying to show the wind via flags.

Allan’s photo trying to show the wind via flags.

Ilwaco

We were done in Long Beach with enough light left to do a bit of gardening at home.  On the way, we did some light deadheading on one block of Ilwaco street trees and planters.

narcissi in a planter

narcissi in a planter

simplex2

Pretty sure the small cupped one is Narcissus jonquilla simplex. Love it, and it is fragrant.

More flowers bloom in the windows of art galleries on the block.  Penny Treat Gallery

More flowers bloom in the windows of art galleries on the block.  Penny Treat gallery (Allan’s photo)

DSC00041

Allan’s photo

 

 

 

And in the window of Azure salon, the poster for the rhodie tour:

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I was mighty tired by now.  And yet the huge shotweeds in my garden were on my mind, and I swore I would get at least one bucket of them weeded out of the middle bed.

admiring a dog tooth violet by our driveway

admiring a dog tooth violet by our driveway

a tulip almost blown

a tulip almost blown

an accidental colour combination

an accidental colour combination

middle bed before

middle bed before

The wind was chilly and unpleasant.  But despite that, reader, I got three buckets of shotweed out.  The other weeds are not so quick to throw seeds everywhere, and I got the shotweed before it reached the point of pinging me in the eyes with its small sharp seeds.  (That’s why one of its common names is Jumping Jesus.)

after...not done, but better

after…not done, but better

I even got some of the shotweed in the east bed and felt proud of myself for preservering.

This spot had been huge shotweeds taller than the lily bulbs.

This spot had been huge shotweeds taller than the lily bulbs.

Allan had done some strimming while I weeded and we both retreated to the house as the wind increased further.  We are surely due for a stormy day off tomorrow, perhaps time to read one of my stack of library books.

I was able to erase several things from the work board…and added the two big projects that are next in line (along with regular maintenance) and which must be done in April this year (I hope): weeding the parking lot berms and the Bolstadt beach approach.  I thought if I put down the numbers of the sections of each job, it would give me the pleasure of more frequent erasures.  Each of the 13 sections of the beach approach garden takes three or more hours.

revised work board

revised work board; I can still count backwards

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 22 April 2014

Oh, the accursed cold wind…We headed out optimistically with some plants in the van, thinking to get all the way to Klipsan Beach Cottages and then pick up a load of soil for where the pampas grass had been removed, by backhoe, at the entrance to The Anchorage Cottages.  First we went through Long Beach so I could take a couple of photos to show to the powers that be at Ilwaco City Hall.

Long Beach hole in the ground with quick connect hose

Long Beach hole in the ground with quick connect hose

The Ilwaco planters are still in play, it seems, and we may still be making a proposal. When the city put the job out for propsals,  and we initially decided not to propose, we were at first sad, then hugely relieved and even jubilant to no longer be facing four months of bucket watering.  We realized that we, and that means mostly Allan last year, have been carrying 20 five gallon buckets of water every third and sometimes every second day.  That comes to about 670 lbs of water per watering session (assuming about a gallon spills as he wrestles the bucket out of our utility trailer).

We probably would have continued watering the planters by bucket until we keeled over with buckets in hand.  But now we have been forced to think about the job and we realized we don’t want to do that anymore.  We are trying to find a solution because some locals really want us to do the job.

One year we did try to use a water pump truck.  Even with a powerful battery and a powerful pump, it took an extra 45 minutes to water each time, because of the time spent coiling and uncoiling hoses and waiting for water to come out of the hose.  We did not have 45 extra minutes to spare so we went back to the quicker method of using buckets.

We were chatting with Long Beach administrator Gene Miles about how hard it is to bucket water and he said “Why doesn’t the city put faucets in the ground with quick connects?”  What a concept!  We have a few of those in Long Beach, as shown in the photo above.  We realized how wonderful it would be for us, or for whoever had the job, to have a faucet available at each intersection to which a hose could be hooked up to water four planters and four trees.  If the hose did not reach to a planter in the middle of the block, it would be easy to fill a watering can and walk half a block to the planter.  We realized that we are quite simply through with bucket watering.  I’m almost 60 and Allan is 61; this bucket watering thing has got to end because it is physically the hardest and most exhausting and dreaded part of our work week.  We are hoping that our town decides it will be possible to install such an arrangement at each intersection (four in all) and if they do, the planter job will be easier for anyone to do.

With that photo mission accomplished, we swung by The Anchorage to make sure the pampas grass had indeed been removed.  And they had.

Anchorage Cottages: It's a short walk through beach pines and dunes to the beach.

Anchorage Cottages: It’s a short walk through beach pines and dunes to the beach.

The grasses were in the entry bed just where the drive curves, left of the pointer.

The grasses were in the entry bed just where the drive curves, left of the pointer.

The pampas grasses as they were...from the Anchorage Cottages website

The pampas grasses as they were…from the Anchorage Cottages website

In the past year, the work crew at the Anchorage have cut down the plumes just before their peak, because the fluff, blown by the wind, gets into all sorts of ventilation grates on the cottages and sticks to everything.  I said, if you are not going to let them bloom, which is the only good thing about them, get rid of them!

The weeds left behind were more extensive than I had imagined, a veritable lawn in places.

The pampas grass had hidden quite a mess.

The pampas grass had hidden quite a mess.

I realized immediately that there would be no Klipsan Beach Cottages gardening that day and we began to weed.  The white flowered Escallonia iveyi shrubs looked beaten up by our cold winter with lots of dead twigs so we cut them way back to where there is nice firm new growth at the base.

escallonia before pruning

escallonia before pruning

waiting out a squall in the van, looking west toward beach pines and dunes

waiting out a squall in the van, looking west toward beach pines

With the weeding done, we went to The Basket Case to get a few lavenders and armeria (sea thrift) for the Long Beach planters. I thought we would have time to do some planting in the very late afternoon.  The annuals greenhouse is full of luscious plants that we will not start planting till around Mother’s Day, my magical date for the weather being, one hopes, warmer and the high winds being over.  (This theory has not always worked as we have had some high wind after Mother’s Day that has been mighty hard on little cosmos.)

Basket Case annuals house

Basket Case annuals house

next door to The Basket Case, a stunning double file viburnum

next door to The Basket Case, a stunning double file viburnum

Just up the road was our next destination, Peninsula Landscape Supply.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We offloaded the escallonia debris....

Allan offloaded the escallonia debris….

The debris pile will be ground up and turned into this sort of aged mulch.

The debris pile will be ground up and turned into this sort of aged mulch.

And then we got a yard of Soil Energy.

And then we got a yard of Soil Energy.

I thought about our next acquisition which will be a load of pea gravel to top off the recently weeded garden at the 42nd Street Café.

an hour of gravel shifting looms in our future...

an hour of gravel shifting looms in our future…

back we go, west on Pioneer Road, past the Cranberry Research Station to the Anchorage

back we go, west on Pioneer Road, past the Cranberry Research Station to the Anchorage

I had seen a scrim of weeds along one of the garden beds at The Anchorage so I set to work on that.  Allan was able to park right next to the former pampas grass bed so the offloading of the lightweight soil energy was fairly easy. (By the way, we have never chosen to plant a pampas grass anywhere; these were old plants from before our time.)

Anchorage center courtyard; imagine a strong, cold, miserable wind blowing.

Anchorage center courtyard; imagine a strong, cold, miserable wind blowing.

Many of the tulips had held up to the weather.

Tulip 'Virichic'

Tulip ‘Virichic’

more tulips in the center courtyard

more tulips in the center courtyard

late tulips still coming on

late tulips still coming on

I'm concerned that the larger shrubs in the courtyard have had a hard winter...and may be as tired of the wind as I am.

I’m concerned that the larger shrubs in the courtyard have had a hard winter…and may be as tired of the wind as I am.

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' in the courtyard.

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in the courtyard.

We still have not found time to prune down the Viburnums by the office...They have to be kept below the window boxes, and the top leaves look battered by winter.

We still have not found time to prune down the Viburnums by the office…They have to be kept below the window boxes, and the leaves look battered by winter.

by the office, Tulips 'Jackpot ' and 'Rococo'

by the office, Tulips ‘Jackpot ‘ and ‘Rococo’

'Irene' and 'China Town' are a colour clash that I did not intend.

‘Irene’ and ‘China Town’ are a colour clash that I did not intend.

Strong Gold is going on for weeks...almost over now.

Strong Gold is going on for weeks…almost over now.

Parrot Tulip 'Green Wave' in bud, one of my favourites

Parrot Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in bud, one of my favourites

Parrot Tulip 'Rococo' just barely hanging on

Parrot Tulip ‘Rococo’ just barely hanging on

I have noted that the peony flowering tulips, like Angelique and Sensual Touch, tend to molder away in the rain.  Despite their similar frilliness, the parrot tulips do beautifully and last a long time and look wonderful even as they shatter.

The birdbath by the office.

the birdbath by the office

Behind the birdbath I saw some weedy grass.  The wind had me chilled and miserable and I had decided I could not even stand to plant anything in Long Beach.  Maybe the rosemary by the police station.  Maybe a couple of lavenders?  I just wanted to be home with a nice hot cuppa tea.

not today...

not today…

As we raked out the soil energy mulch and packed up our gear, the wind got worse and the sky looked ominously dark.

today's project, after

today’s project, after

done just in time...

done just in time…

and then the rain came

and then the rain came

I tried to check Dark Sky (a weather app) and was told where we were….

in the middle of nowhere!

in the middle of nowhere!

a few blocks closer to town....

a few blocks closer to town….

and at 642.weather.com, I saw the wind had been 27 mph at their Sandridge Road weather station, inland so usually less windy.

and at 642.weather.com, I saw the wind had been 27 mph at their Sandridge Road weather station, inland so usually less windy.

We drove down First Avenue in Ilwaco, scouting for gravelly or grassy spots at the four intersections where maybe the city could put in water faucets for the planter watering.

dark skies at the Ilwaco boatyard

dark skies at the Ilwaco boatyard

The plants in the van would have to just go for a ride and wait for better weather.  At home, it became clear we had made the right decision to stop working.

I had hoped that Anchorage would only need half of the soil energy mulch so that I could put some onto the pile next to Nora’s driveway, for planting some veg there later.  The Anchorage had needed the entire yard and I was awfully glad to have none left to offload in the rain.

from my southeast window, this project will have to wait.

from my southeast window, this project will have to wait.

Nora's bluebells

Nora’s bluebells

reflected in the wet driveway

reflected in the wet driveway

rain to the south

rain to the south

Allan worked on his rechargeable electric chainsaw...in the kitchen sink.

Allan cleaned his rechargeable chainsaw…in the kitchen sink.

A dramatic downpour turned Nora’s driveway into a river.

downpour

battered the south windows...

battered the south windows…

east window

east window

Later I saw that the tulips in my garden boat had turned to face me.

Later I saw that the tulips in my garden boat had turned to face me.

beautiful in disarray

beautiful in disarray

I had plenty of time to create the long and involved blog entry about visiting Stephen and John’s garden on the previous day.   My ear panged with a sharp intermittent ache, I hoped just from the cold wind as I do not have time to be sick.  And then we watched some telly that I had been longing to see:  the season premiere of The Deadliest Catch.  I’d been thinking all day that I needed a refresher in how hard crabbers work insanely long hours in the worst weather.  When out in the wind, or worse yet wind and rain (which we try to avoid but there are gardening emergencies related to upcoming tourism events), I repeat to myself, “It could be worse; I could be crab fishing on the Bering Sea.”

my inspiration

my inspiration

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 14 November, 2013

Although we had a big bulbing day planned, we just had to make a brief stop at Olde Towne to see Luanne, who had been gone for 13 days to visit her daughter, son-in-law and grand daughters in Maine.

She's back!

She’s back!

We had the briefest of visits (she had time to sit at a table for maybe two minutes) and then we had to be on our way till a rainy day.  Soon we will be back for a proper sit down, I hope!

I had hoped that today would be the rainy day as I would have liked to have had time to sort, at home on the sorting table (with my sorting hat on?) the Long Beach bulbs into tidy batches with a bag ready for each planter.  That did not happen.  However, being able to set the boxes with easy access from the side doors of our new van made it possible to sort right on the job.  That is the main reason that this year, we are experiencing Bulb Time rather than Bulb Hell.  The new vehicle and the pleasant weather are collaborating to make it the easiest bulbs season in my experience.  Getting bulb crates into and out of Allan’s two door Saturn was not a happy time.

easy sorting

easy access

I had a little “office” set up on my passenger seat with clipboard and pen.  What luxury.

Down by the empty lot on Third Street, where the birds had view unimpeded by building of me setting tasty morsels of bulbs out on the edge of the planters, I garnered lots of attention.

These two...

These two…

and especially this one.

and especially this one.

The gull who staked out the bulbs actually did not get a single one, but it sure did want to.

gull

pacing and plotting

pacing and plotting

closer

closer

gull

acting cool near the bag of bulbs

acting cool near the bag of bulbs

Only my presence right there kept him thwarted.

Only my presence right there kept him thwarted.

Years ago, I learned not to lay out bulbs all down the length of the beach approach garden before planting them.

bulb planting on the beach approach in 2004

bulb planting on the beach approach in 2004

(Now that rugosa roses have pretty much taken over the beach approach garden and now that we have full care of the Long Beach planters, we don’t plant many new bulbs out there anymore.)

There are a few businesses with such a strong colour theme that I try to plant bulbs that sort of match.

Tulip 'White Parrot' in fron the blue and white Home at the Beach gift shop.

I planted Tulip ‘White Parrot’ in fron the blue and white Home at the Beach gift shop.

Red Parrot tulip 'Rococo' did very well last year so I planted more near this red cottage.

Red Parrot tulip ‘Rococo’ did very well last year so I planted more near this red cottage.

The lower tulip is 'Rococo', last spring.

The lower tulip is ‘Rococo’, last spring.

A couple of years ago I had the perfect colour match for the Hungry Harbour Grille:

Tulip 'Gavota' matched the paint trim perfectly.

Tulip ‘Gavota’ matched the paint trim perfectly.

The Cottage Bakery also called for red 'Rococo'.

This year, The Hungry Harbor and The Cottage Bakery both got Rococo.

Red tulips are my least favourite (except for the fabulous ‘Rococo’ with its green flames).  I always have plenty of “green” tulips as they are my favourites.  That makes it easy to plant green ones in front of Niva green.

Niva green, last spring

Niva green, last spring; this year it will get ‘Green Wave’

Maybe some year I will buy tulips in tiny (more expensive) quantities so that I can match every building!

I tried not to do any projects other than planting, but one that did need doing today was to dig out two big, old, woody Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ from a planter by the Fifth Street Park.

Allan used our cool new shovel from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

Allan used our cool new shovel from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

old Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

old Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

woody center

woody center

I have many Autumn Joy sedums around and so I just went to the park and got two fresh new division for the planter, after Allan added some new potting soil.  I think every Autumn Joy in every park and garden that we do on the Peninsula is a division of the one I brought down from Seattle in autumn of 1992!

While on the same block, I enjoyed seeing two peace posters in the “Herb ‘N’ Legend” smoke shop windows.

peace

peace

While Schizostylis can fill up a planter too vigourously, it can also choose to bloom in a perfect late season floral arrangement.

Schizostylis by Fifth Street

Schizostylis by Fifth Street

I had a passerby ask me about it today, but she did so when I was not by a planter than had it, or I would have yanked some up and given it to her.  Later, when I was working by The Wooden Horse gift shop, manager Linda came out and saw a blooming piece of this very Schizostylis in our trailer (accidentally pulled while planting bulbs by the lamp post) so I gave the rooted piece to her;  I should dig her up a nice clump!

outside The Wooden Horse...I like the sign with clothespins for photos or postcards.

outside The Wooden Horse…I like the sign with clothespins for photos or postcards.

Today’s easiest planter was the one by the Carousel where we had dug out vinca recently and replaced it with nice fluffy dirt.  I was glad to see no birds watching this one as the bulbs would be easy picking with no plants to protect them.

The easiest planter to plant was the one by the carousel...recently dug out vinca and replaced with fluffy soil.

The easiest planter today.

I put in two little golden marjoram starts (dug from another planter) and two little Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ starts (snagged from a park).

Hungry Harbor Grille

Hungry Harbor Grille

When I got as far as The Hungry Harbor Grille, I remembered that tonight is Mexican night (every Thursday offseason) and that, because I had finished the big bulb sorting, we could go after work!

It had taken, as always, what seemed an incredible long time to get just that far.  Some rain began.  I examined the sky.  Was the blue just a sucker hole?

This is what a sucker hole looks like.

This is what a sucker hole looks like.

The blue came through for me and the rain stopped.

While Allan planted the last planters on the block south of the Bolstadt stop light, I put tiny bulbs in the four Fish Alley barrels.  The tapestry effect I was trying for is still working.

Fish Alley, one of four planters

Fish Alley, one of four planters

In went some species crocus, some Iris reticulata, some snowdrops and some Narcissi ‘Baby Moon’.  I plant Baby Moon every year and am adding 410 more to the planters this year because it reliably blooms during the annual first-Satuday-in-May parade.

Moon rise over Fish Alley

Moon rise over Fish Alley

From the alley, I could see the most amazing sky to the west:  wild shapes of clouds outline in pink.  I had bulbs all placed ready to plant and could not abandon them and a building was between me and any long distance photo of the sky.  We did get out to the beach.  While the clouds still looked impressive, the outline of pink had gone.

beyond the boardwalk

beyond the boardwalk

I will scour Facebook to see if any local caught the sunset on film!

I will scour Facebook to see if any local caught the sunset on film!

It was mildly frustrating to have run out of daylight with eight planters and two trees still to do on the main street.  It always takes me by surprise what a long job it is to plant the bulbs there.

We had our comforting Mexican dinner and came home, NOT to sort bulbs.  Instead, I finally added thirteen days of time card information to the work spread sheet.  Sometimes this blog is essential to remembering what we did on a certain day.

And the cats snoozed…

Smokey and Mary

Smokey and Mary

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