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Posts Tagged ‘Tulip ‘West Point’’

Friday, 6 April 2018

Allan did a bit of work today, deadheading (mostly narcissi) while I gardened at home.  I am so hoping that the Saturday through Sunday windstorm does not pop the flowers off the tall tulips.

Comments in italics are Allan’s explanations of his day.

Long Beach

This series is a continuation of our May 31 project to photograph all of the Long Beach main street planters and tree gardens during their spring bloom. The ones in the north were still incomplete as the camera battery plotzed.

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Taken safely from across the street.

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With a break in traffic, a closer and more vertical view from the street.

tulip damaged by too much rain. It was then clipped after giving us its message and will try again next year.

A victim of idle hands with destructive thoughts near a bus stop. Several tall stems were also in this planter, missing their flowers.

Building for sale on the prime corner of Pacific and Bolstad

You may recall my trauma a couple of years ago when a shopkeeper picked all the tulips, and then when I tried to explain why that was just not on, said snarkily, “So are you crying now?”  (I was misty with frustration.)  THAT is the building now for sale.

Please hold up to the storm, delicate long-stemmed tulips!

It is so uncommon to have a severe windstorm this late in tulip season that I recall only one year when many tulips got snapped off by the wind.

a beautiful sunny spring break Saturday

Lewis and Clark Square

Lewis and Clark Square with Police Station and Veterans Field

Tulip ‘Formosa’ blooming early (at least I think it is Formosa, which usually blooms latest of all)

Tulips ‘Tom Pouce’ and ‘West Point’

Tulip saxatalis at the police station

After the much appreciated work in Long Beach, Allan went to a wildlife refuge area at the end of the “dump road”.

The Reikkola Unit

Lysichiton americanum, skunk cabbage or swamp lantern lined the entrance road after passing Penninsula Sanitation & Recycling.

swamp lanterns

There were so many that the air smelled skunky.

A flourishing example on the Reikkola Unit trail. 

This bloom in its prime had curious ants.

Near the parking area, this guy was sunbathing and enjoying a dip in the warm water.

I had heard a rumor that a boat ramp was being considered out here which a kayak could launch from. One issue postponing it was that this is a gated area after a person walks from the parking area. But, since little boats are light, perhaps I could walk it in when the tide is right.

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a distance glimpse of Willapa Bay. I took the path to the right thinking the water adjacent the tree might lead out to the bay. The path to the left leads to Parker Slough which turns out is the more likely site for boat access. 

The channel soon petered out.

I stopped a short 3/4 mile walk from the car. It would be a long walk carrying a boat. Still no waterway but there’s an old spare pedestrian bridge.

Looking west from the pedestrian bridge towards Parker Slough.

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Even in the later afternoon, there rose no breath of wind to turn it into a sailing day.

 

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Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Some garden admiration while loading the trailer for work:

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe 'Black Hero' returning for several years in a row.

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe ‘Black Hero’ returning for several years in a row.

a Hebe next to Erysimum 'Winter Orchid' (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

a Hebe next to Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

Port of Ilwaco

After a quick check on Spruce Street to see if the two street planters have been shifted to their new positions (they haven’t), we started weeding and fertilizing at the east end of Howerton Way and worked our way west.  One day was not enough time to do a perfect job. We got the biggest weeds and a lot of small ones and left a few more hidden areas unweeded for lack of time.    It would have been a great day to “Map my Walk”….if I had remembered.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

easternmost garden, before (Allan's photo)

easternmost garden, before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

looking west

looking west from Howerton and Elizabeth

While we were weeding that long bed, Mayor Mike stopped by, and over the course of the conversation I agreed to take on the community building garden.  What?  We are supposed to be cutting back.  My affection for Ilwaco won over good sense.  I have always said I would not do that garden with its bindweed, horsetail, and (in my often disagreed-with opinion) too much heather planted on level ground.  I am fussy about heather and only appreciate it on a slope.  Also, there is salal which I cannot abide in a garden.  (A fellow CPN later said to me, “Salal gets mowed.” So we’ll see if I can live with weeding around heather and salal.  We have two fewer private gardens in Ilwaco this year, and I said to Allan that the amount of work time will probably come out about the same as last year by adding the community garden.

At least I had the sense to tell Mike that we would not be able to get to it for a couple of weeks.  Lawdy, we don’t even have the Long Beach beach approach garden weeded yet and that usually takes us 6-7 days.

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan's photo)

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

with ornamental grass (Allan's photo)

with ornamental grass (Allan’s photo)

At the Ilwaco Pavilion garden bed, I had the urge to do some alteration.  Out came two clumps of Pacific Reed Grass and in went a Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’ and a couple of golden variegated lemon thyme and some seeds of ‘Twister’ California poppy.

before

before

after

after

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ and beautifully round santolinas

An orange helianthemum is blooming already.  How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

An orange helianthemum is blooming already. How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

I added one Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ to the garden on the south side of the Port Office.

port office garden

port office garden

As we went along all these gardens today, I fertilized selected plants rather than casting the fertilizer all over the beds.  I fear the latter approach would get loose dogs to digging.  I’m worried already that dogs will get into the port office bed and break off my precious alliums.

Allium albopilosum already blooming

Allium albopilosum already almost blooming

and another cluster of big fat buds

and another cluster of big fat buds

If dogs were drawn in by fertilizer smells, at least it would be unintentional damage unlike human finger blight; I also fear people finding the alliums irresistable to pluck, not realizing that each bulb is expensive and only produces one flower per year.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

We did a thorough weeding of the beds on the north side of the port office and Don Nisbett Art Gallery, despite a little argy- bargy about whether we were going too slow (so quoth Allan) and me wanting to achieve something like perfection because the Saturday Market will be open with people walking past the gardens.

before

before

after

after

before

before

after2

The bed above is proof that even though narcissi perennialize, they sometimes have to be replenished.  They have petered out completely here so we must plant more next fall.

As we weeded those beds, a fellow engaged us in conversation and gave us his attractive business card.  He will have a booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market this summer, selling varieties of cherry tomatoes and (I think) some sort of condiments or sauces.  His items sounded delicious.

card

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

By the time we reached the next bed, adjacent to Time Enough Books, I was having to sacrifice perfection for speed.  If we did not get the boatyard done today as well, we would not have time to do our north end jobs this week.  We got most of the weeds and I hoped that the river rock and many beach strawberries would disguise the little grasses that we left behind.

Time anxiety ruled and some weeds had to be skipped over.

Time anxiety ruled and some little weeds had to be skipped over.

While we were weeding somewhere along this stretch, someone from a passing car yelled out “We love you!” or maybe “I love you!”  By the time I uncricked my neck and looked up, the vehicle was two blocks away.  If indeed the words were directed at us, it was much nicer than being honked at.  The honking, while usually from friends, is jarring and startling when one is working along a busy street, especially in Long Beach.

I deadheaded the tulips in the Time Enough Books garden boat; they are yellow to catch the eye of passersby.

boat

west

Tulip 'Akebono' (left) is my favourite this year.

Tulip ‘Akebono’  is my favourite this year.

Tulip 'Akebono'

Tulip ‘Akebono’

Tulip 'Akebono'; note the thin red petal outline

Tulip ‘Akebono’; note the thin red petal outline

lily flowering Tulip 'West Point'

lily flowering Tulip ‘West Point’

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

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Narcissus 'Baby Moon' blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

By the time we got to the two westernmost garden beds, I had despaired of getting to the boatyard at all, and while weeding I brooded about which jobs we would have to skip in order to get Ilwaco and Long Beach completely groomed for the clam festival on Saturday.  As one might expect when one is running out of time, the last two beds proved to be exceptionally weedy.  We had filled almost every bucket with weeds, so Allan drove off to the east end of the port to dump the debris.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

He's sorry this photo came out blurry...but look at that strut!

He’s sorry this photo came out blurry…but look at that strut!

At this grim hour, as I kept slogging along on that exceptionally weedy westernmost garden bed, who should track us down by Todd Wiegardt, newly moved back to the Long Beach Peninsula.  (You may recall that he has been mailing us cool plants since last summer.)  As we talked, he couldn’t resist weeding. With his expert help (he used to be the curator of the display garden for the famous Plant Delights Nursery in North Carolina), we got the last Howerton Way gardens done well enough to move on to the boatyard.  Just have a look at this photo album of the Juniper Level Botanic Garden of which he was curator and you will see why I had no worries that he might pull out a good plant.

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

Allan and Todd weeding

Allan and Todd weeding the last Howerton Way bed.

Todd’s weeding technique impressed me in that he has speed and the knack of removing the weeds without disturbing the soil very much.  (Turning the soil over encourages more weed seeds to germinate.)

On to the boatyard!  All the nasty big horsetail had started to poke out of the soil.  With less than two hours till sunset, we just tried to get most of it broken off (said to be more effective than pulling it) and the larger weeds and bindweed pulled.  The littler weeds will mostly have to wait till the week before the May 2 children’s parade.

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan's photo)

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

(Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

I had planted Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ all along the edge thinking how cute it would be all in flower for the parade.  Of course, as regular readers have heard me saying for weeks now, it is blooming WAY EARLY.  I doubt it will last till May 2nd.

 Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

two weeders (Allan's photo)

two weeders (Allan’s photo)

I finally had to call uncle as it looked like Todd could keep going; I had hit the wall.

indefatiguable

One of us was indefatigable and it was not me.

the man who saved the day!  (Allan's photo)

the man who saved the day! (Allan’s photo)

Thanks to Todd, we got the three block long boatyard done well enough to call it good for the early Saturday Market opening.  (The Market’s official opening day is May 2nd; this week is a sneak preview in association with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival.)

The Perserverance.

The Perserverance.

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