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Posts Tagged ‘twig arbour’

Saturday, 13 September 2014

We spent a very few minutes before going “overseas” on a visit to the Ilwaco Saturday Market, as I still feel responsible for getting some weekly photos for Discover Ilwaco.  Allan went up on the port office balcony and happened to capture the moment when I encountered our good friend Kathleen.

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We were both in blue.

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a brief market stroll

a brief market stroll

I wanted some Swedish traveling cake from Pink Poppy Bakery; unfortunately, I happened upon the very few minutes that Madeline was away from her booth, and I was anxious to get on the way to Cannon Beach.

Howerton Way garden on the walk back to the van

Howerton Way garden on the walk back to the van

While stopped on the Astoria bridge because of construction, we got to enjoy the view.

looking west

looking west

lots of little boats out fishing

lots of little boats out fishing

tiny boats in the vast Columbia River

tiny boats in the vast Columbia River

boats

Part of my hurry to get going from the market had been that I wanted time to stop at 7 Dees garden center south of Seaside.

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7Dees

The plants need much water in this heat (84 degrees and rising).

The plants need much water in this heat.

Very cool tree, Azara microphylla, for sale.

Very cool tree, Azara microphylla, for sale.

an unusual arbour

an unusual arbour

arbour

detail

detail

This gorgeous brugmansia was tempting, but would have had to sit in a hot car all day and then been babied through the winter.

This gorgeous brugmansia was tempting, but would have had to sit in a hot car all day and then been babied through the winter.

Allan's photo:  Ready to plant wall art with wood surrounds and screened.

Allan’s photo: Ready to plant wall art with wood surrounds and screened.

Lots of chrysanthemum blooms just coming on

Lots of chrysanthemum blooms just coming on

The plant for which I was on a mission was plain, simple, rustic Rudbeckia (black eyed Susan).  I only had ten minutes to shop and keep on schedule and I did not see any…except in the display garden.

display

On we went to Cannon Beach.

84 and rising!

heading south…84 and rising!

When we got to the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, we had about half an hour to wait before tour maps would be available.  It was better to be there early; we had left early as one never knows how long one might have to wait for construction on the Astoria Megler bridge.

Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, photo from Cannon Beach Visitors Center.

Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, photo from Cannon Beach Visitors Center.

Filled with eager anticipation, as I look forward to the cottage tour all summer, w e walked half a block to look at one of the cottages that would be on the tour later.  (Actually, just the garden on this one was open.)

a vacation rental with pretty garden

a vacation rental with pretty garden

I saw that the same sign of rules was up as last year.

sign

I find it just shocking that anyone would open cabinets or drawers inside a tour home.  What a shame.  Or smoke…or use the restroom…or pick, remove, or alter flowers!  Goodness gracious.  Human nature astonishes me sometimes.  Adults should behave themselves better.

I must address the no photography rule so that readers will know we are not scofflaws.  Before the tour, I messaged with the executive director museum about whether or not it would be ok to ask to take photos and she said she did not think anyone would mind.  We asked at each place, at least at the ones where we wanted to take photos of darling cottage details.  Because most of the historic cottages this time were vacation rentals, there are already photos of their interiors on the Cannon Beach Vacation Rental website, and two of them were for sale with lots of interior photos up on real estate sites.

I had a good conversation about it with the docent for the amazing home overlooking Haystack Rock, whose owner was there and was completely open to people taking photos.  The ever so pleasant and jolly docent said he did not think any owners minded photos being taken.  I said that some must, or the rule would not be in place.  We agreed that a great solution would be to have a sign on the doors of houses where the owners do object, saying “No photography in this home, please.”  It would save the embarrassment of someone like me with social anxiety having to ask…and it would be nice for the other guests, as well.  I saw many people with fancy cameras around their necks who may not have known that they could ask, and  one woman mournfully said to me upon hearing me being given permission, “My husband would have come if he had known he could take photos at some of the houses.”

The charming docent who said he thought none of the owners minded and who liked my individual sign idea said he would talk to the director; I said “Oh, dear, she will know it is that obnoxious woman from Ilwaco again” and he laughed and said he would be sure to say that it was the idea of the obnoxious woman from Ilwaco.   The tour certainly does not need to accommodate my wishes to succeed, as it is a sellout every year.  Allan kindly pointed out that they would not miss me if I stopped going.

I love to be able to share photos of cottage details with blog readers (all three of them) back east, in the UK, and in Australia. The light coming in through a beach view window and falling upon a vase of flowers, a basket of shells, a set of books about beach life.  These details do not reveal anything that could be used in a damaging way, even if I exert my direst imagination to try to figure out how that could happen.

I googled around about home tours and found that the no photography rule is common for home tours in the cities.  I wonder how tour goers feel about that?  I assume folks go on such tours to gather ideas for their own homes.  How can they remember the look of a certain kitchen cupboard or woodwork trim without a photo?  And yet I can understand why big fancy houses (which I would not want to tour anyway, and that’s not just sour grapes) would want to protect their STUFF.  Little cottages usually don’t have big fancy stuff and the sorts of things that I love and want to remember are seashells hanging in a window, a vase of flowers on a table, old dishes on a worn pantry shelf.

Here are some examples of treasured memories from past tours (memories only because of the photos):

old fashioned fireplace surround

old fashioned fireplace surround

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window

window

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photos

rustic headboard

rustic headboard

Oh how I wish I could get a special press pass that allows me to take just details like the above!

If there were a “cottaged-up double wide home tour”, would I let people take photos inside?  Why yes, I most certainly would.

So we asked at each cottage, and were given permission for the photos that follow.  We only wanted photos at the old and/or quirky cottages.  Ironically, at one house Allan was allowed to take photos but when I went back later (and the docent shift had perhaps changed), I was told no photos, possibly by a different docent who did not know that the rule was optional.  I am still pondering about that one, as not only has it been featured on HGTV but it has 20 interior shots online at a realtor’s site.  Oh, well!

Enjoy!

 

 

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