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Posts Tagged ‘vegetable garden’

Saturday, 20 July 2019

Gardens, Sea and Art tour

presented by the WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties

Ocean Shores

Garden 8: Fruit, Berries and Roses

Allan’s photo

A path winds through front garden trees…

…to a fenced side yard full of fruits and veg.  I am always impressed with a successful kitchen garden, especially in a maritime climate.  Kitchen gardening is something at which I do not excel.

a serious deer fence (Allan’s photo)

strawberries

Allan’s photo

lemons and oranges

berries

Allan’s photo

roses and grapes

at the back of the grapes

 

Allan’s photo

 

Allan’s photo

inside the green mesh house

Allan’s photo

potted paulownia tree

into the back garden…

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

..where a path led off into the woods.

We returned to the front garden and made our plans with Peter and Kilyn for an early dinner.

Peter contemplates the front garden

Allan and I waited till Teresa caught up and then we all met at…

Galway Bay Irish Pub

Allan’s photo

We enjoyed our meal and could see why an Ocean Shores friend had recommended this place.

bangers and mash

potato soup

Just before we left, we found that if we went through the Guinness door…

…we would come upon an dining patio that looked most appealing.

It lacked the large table that we had needed for our excellent feast.

We parted ways, till meeting again tomorrow morning at Markham Farm.

pink petunias on the way to Markham

The last page of the tour booklet:

Still to come before returning to the workaday world: Markham Farm, of course, and a return visit to Cindy’s garden, one of our favourites from last year’s tour.

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 20 July 2019

Ocean Shores

From Markham to Ocean Shores was an hour’s drive.  Upon arrival, we were surrounded by water on three sides.

This tourism map hints at the complexity of roads and canals in the small city of Ocean Shores.

Gardens, Sea and Art tour

presented by the WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties

We began at Garden by the Sea.

Peter and Kilyn awaited us there so that we could do the tour together.

I found it an excellent idea to have the plant sale at the first tour stop instead of somewhere in the middle.

Allan’s photo

Kilyn told us that in Richmond, British Columbia, community gardens are not allowed to have fences or even signs warning against plant theft! Nor can they have sheds.  I thought about how in the UK, each allotment plot gets a little shed of its own.

plant sale

Speaking of sheds…

We toured the garden beds of both flowers and food.

Wouldn’t it be nice to live in a place with a view of a community garden?

At the center of the garden stood a beautiful carved pillar. I could not make out what it said, lacking the patience to go round and round.

And there was compost….

…with a list of compostables.

Now the four of us were off to the first of eight private gardens.  To my delight, these were not designed gardens of the rich but gardens from the heart.  One of the missions of this tour each year is to show gardens that are created by the owners, often without big money.  Please remember that while reading and commenting, and especially remember that the garden owners might be reading the posts. There are blogs that criticize and review gardens.  This is not one of them.  I appreciate anyone who dares to open their garden for a tour.

 

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Saturday, 21 July 2018

2018 Spade and Wade Garden Tour

Sponsored by the Tillamook County Master Gardener Association

garden two: Vegetables and Glorious Trees, Tillamook

garden greeters under one of two enormous liriodendron (tulip) trees

the pair of liriodendrons

liriodendron leaf

Allan’s photo

Allan said, “It was a hot day, and trees are good.  It was the only garden where I laid down on the lawn and looked up at the trees and was just happy.”

Allan’s photo

Every tree has a story.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

pump house and hypericum

next to the barn “nestled in the foothills east of Tillamook”

“Stone sculptors from the Bay City Arts Center will be demonstrating the art of stone sculpting.”

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

stone carving

Allan’s photo

By the barn, in a pen, a bunny was getting much attention.

Allan’s photo of Harry, the bunny

Allan’s photo

Harry liked Allan. (Allan’s photo)

“The house is over 85 years old and surrounded by large fir trees to keep the property private.”

Allan’s photo

“Ruth’s specialty is bonsai.”

Allan’s photo

local bonsai club (here is a ten year old article about them)

Garden owner Don’s pièce de résistance is his vegetable garden, with a view of the foothills.

the always interesting compost pile

“He believes in simplicity, using tools from his grandfather to hoe and weed the grounds because they still work!”

“….neat, wide rows of beans, peas, potatoes, corn, squash, lettuces, cabbages. blueberries, and more…”

stone fence toppers

Don said that he grew everything from seed except for tomatoes and peppers and that he hand waters the vegetable rows only, which is why there are few weeds between the rows.  He made a hose guide so that the hose stays in place.

A cut piece of jug of some sort keeps the hose from sliding back.

The back yard:

back yard (Allan’s photo)

As we departed for two nearby gardens, we admired some cows right across the highway.

 

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As I continue to catch up with the work blog….

July 30

We begin at the Port where the garden at Time Enough Books needs some water.

I admire the Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ which is at its peak in the gardens on the north side of the Port Office.

looking east

looking east

looking west

looking west

close up

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Then…on to Gene’s garden in south Long Beach.  It is still looking very good from the tour, but I am going to be guiding a garden club tour there on August 7, so we want to make sure it is deadheaded thoroughly to keep the cosmos going.  (I have no idea why I write some posts in present and some in past tense, if any editor types are wondering.)

front corner of street-side garden

front (SW) corner of street-side garden

painted sage at east end of street-side garden

painted sage at east end of street-side garden

I never tire of painted sage and hope my 50? readers don’t either!

looking east

looking east

I spy a hummingbird on the Crocosmia 'Lucifer'!

I spy a hummingbird on the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’!

garden detail

garden detail

in the courtyard

in the courtyard

Gene's upcycled pallet composter and how it opens at the base

Gene’s upcycled pallet composter and how it opens at the base

courtyard table

courtyard table

Gene planted this Farfugium.

Gene planted this Farfugium on the shady courtyard wall.

looking south in the courtyard

looking south in the courtyard

Some fragrant lilies would be amazing along the east fence of this courtyard.  Gene would have to diligently protect the new sprouts from slugs.  The scent would fill up the space.

From the outside, just a hint of the courtyard's beauty

From the outside, just a hint of the courtyard’s beauty

Next, we go to Jo’s, also with the purpose of watering and deadheading while Jo and Bob are out of town.  (I can only say this because I am writing it three weeks later!)

Jo's colours still going strong

Jo’s colours still going strong

Jo is missing some of her lilies and I hope they will still be blooming when she and Bob return.  (They were, I am happy to say!)

lily with green throat

downfacing lily

upfacing

upfacing

tall and deep red

tall and deep red

with Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

with Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

daisies topped with Lavatera 'Barnsley'

daisies topped with Lavatera ‘Barnsley’

We then return to Ilwaco to spend a long session weeding in Ann’s garden

Ann's fenced veg garden

Ann’s fenced veg garden

It doesn’t look like much, but I planted a small river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (just three) down a slope on the west side of the garden.

Rozanne with potential

Rozanne with potential

It will look good sprawling and climbing near Ann’s stunning blue hydrangea.

Ann's hydrangea

July 31

We begin at the Depot where a passerby has a wonderful Saint Bernard.  This, of course, causes me to strike up a conversation in order to pet the dog.

dog

It turns out the dog’s person is on the board (President, I think) of the Water Music Festival, so he knows who I am (in that I do the Facebook page for the Music in the Gardens tour) but due to face blindness I did not recognize him.  Have also forgotten the name of the wonderful sweet dog, but have not forgotten that the website of the man’s guest cottage has a photo of the dog as a pup.  Years ago, when the larger cottage and the guest cottage belonged to Bev Rolfe, Robert and I put in a garden there.

an excellent dog

an excellent dog

He is a dry mouth St Bernard; I did not even know there was such a thing.  My cousin raised St Bernards and I remember the massive drool along with the sweet personalities.  (We were handed towels upon entering the house.)

a cute little chickadee

a cute little chickadee

Alert reader Kathleen Shaw informs me that this is not a chickadee but instead a sparrow.  She thinks it is a white crowned sparrow.

and I almost forgot, what with the dog and all: the garden

and I almost forgot, what with the dog and all: the garden

Next, we make a stop at The Planter Box to take some photos for a pre-tour sneak peeks album for the Edible Gardens page, another project of mine.  Ray Millner has a glorious veg garden just north of the garden center.

At Ray's garden, the chickens came running out to greet us.

At Ray’s garden, the chickens came running out to greet us.

veg of great beauty

veg of great beauty

veg

strawberries by the pond

strawberries by the pond

by the pond (a small lake)

by the pond (a small lake)

chickens by the water

chickens by the water

Then on up the Peninsula to Marilyn’s, which will also be on the Aug 7th little garden club tour, so I want to make sure it is deadheaded.

Marilyn's

Marilyn’s looking south

and looking north

and looking north

Heading back down to Ocean Park, we check on the Wiegardt Gallery garden….

Lavender and Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Lavender and Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

hoping the deer don't eat the lilies

hoping the deer don’t eat the lilies

broken stemmed Alliums tucked into the Cistus

broken stemmed Alliums tucked into the Cistus

north side (Eric's studio) with elephant garlic

north side (Eric’s studio) with elephant garlic

Next: Oman Builders Supply where the garden is showing some stress from not getting enough water.  Our job here is not to water, and it is complicated because one needs a long hose and a key (which we have) to turn on the faucet, and time to stand around and water if the soakers are not doing a good enough job (they are not!)

OBS

OBS, looking south

Next, we spend the usual time thoroughly weeding and deadheading at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I am pleased that a dahlia which did not do much last year is spectacular now.  We planted it in a pot because the garden has a snail problem.

dahlia at KBC

dahlia at KBC

KBC is another Facebook page that I do, and I am way behind on uploading garden photos there, which I used to do on a weekly basis…till this year when I started blogging here daily.

The KBC sweet peas are doing better than at any of our other gardens.

sweet peas

sweet peas

more

As with all the gardens, the lilies are fabulous this week.

lilies

lily

lilies

lily

lily

lily

lily

I feel there is no such thing as lily overload, although I do wish they did not all go through an awkward stage after blooming while we wait for the stem to die back (and clip a little off every week).

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

garden overview

garden overview

You can see Allan on the left, above, pruning the New Dawn rose over the south gate.  While I swan about taking lily photos.  Really, I do work.

Next, we go to Golden Sands Assisted Living.  This time, my expectactions that the watering problems will be fixed are very low.  I know it is too soon, but I hope the wheels of progress have begun to turn.  So we hand water (with our long hose) the whole courtyard.  We have to drag our own hose in because theirs are firmly fixed to the ineffective twirly sprinklers.

The white hydrangeas would get no water at all except for our hose watering.

The white hydrangeas would get no water at all except for our hose watering.

SW quadrant

SW quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

It’s gone rather dull now that the blue scabiosa has gone over.  It would look so much better if we had time to groom and weed rather than standing around hose watering.

At present there is no time to weed this area, which only gets water from us.

At present there is no time to weed this area, which only gets water from us.

Daylilies are a plant that gets overused in a situation like this because it is so easy to get them for free.  Here they sit, not doing much at all.

The NE quadrant outside my mom's old room is still the best...

The NE quadrant outside my mom’s old room is still the best…

Whoever is living in my mom’s old room can’t see out the window because of overgrown shrubs.  It is not our job to fix that, but I would if I had the time.

NW quadrant

NW quadrant

The NW quadrant is still pitiful due to lack of mulch.  (Need I even add…no time…)

If the sprinkler system gets fixed, the corners will get water!

If the sprinkler system gets fixed, the corners will get water!

Next, we go for our weekly session at Andersen’s RV Park.  A man who introduces himself as Bob the Basket Maker (I think) has set himself up there for a few weeks making wonderful baskets.

Basket maker

Basket maker

His baskets are selling well.

His baskets are selling well.

artist at work

artist at work

Walking back, I see a view of the garden that I usually do not see from that far to the west.  The camera does not show it the way my eyes see it, but a severely squashed by telephoto shot sort of does…

The whiskey barrels are not that close together.

The whiskey barrels are not that close together; again, Allan works while I….ooops.

Deadheading Payson Hall is time consuming at this time of year.

Deadheading Payson Hall is time consuming at this time of year.

The picket fence garden

The picket fence garden

Down at the garden shed border, the Alchemilla (lady’s mantle) so very much needs deadheading, but we are about to run out of daylight so we just do not have time.

why I don't especially like lady's mantle....

why I don’t especially like lady’s mantle….

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July 27, 2013

The Gardens by the Sea tour (in Gearhart Oregon) benefits Clatsop CASA.

Garden Five: Judy and Jacob Redekop garden

from the program: “Heads up, gardeners, you’re about to see the art of gardening on display.”

The first things that Allan noticed when we arrived at the Redekop garden was how the honeysuckle was trained over the garage with nary a sign of support.

a CASA volunteer to check tickets

a CASA volunteer to check tickets

The CASA volunteer said several people had asked what the secret support system was, but she did not know…and as with all the other gardens, the owners were not there to answer questions. I don’t mean to whinge on about this in every post, but it just strikes me so very much as the one way this garden tour could be better. In every other way it is ideal.

Allan's honeysuckle photo

Allan’s honeysuckle photo

garden five

garden five

front porch

front porch

front garden

front garden

Allan's tree photo

Allan’s tree photo

flowers against the house

We approach the corner of the house...

We approach the SW corner of the house…

south side of house

I believe this was the south side of house

on the porch

on the porch

porch

porch

sunporch on west side

sunporch on west side

On the west side of the house, the garden is green on green.

a green garden to the west of the house

a green garden to the west of the house

I oriented myself by looking down the street where a path to the ocean dunes lay.

I oriented myself by looking down the street where a path to the ocean dunes lay.

a large parking pad at the SW corner.

a large parking pad at the SW corner.

west side of garden

west side of garden

looking north from the parking pad

looking north from the parking pad

side view of the SW corner of house.

side view of the SW corner of house.

handsome mossy tree trunk

handsome mossy tree trunk

Allan's view of the hydrangeas

Allan’s view of the hydrangeas

The sunporch on the west side looks like such a wonderful space.

the sunporch

the sunporch

Allan got nosy with the sunporch and looked inside with his camera.

wall with painting....

wall with painting….

and closeup of a beautiful painting of the house.

and closeup of a beautiful painting of the house.

a green expanse (for Tom and Mr. Tootlepedal)

a green expanse (for Tom and Mr. Tootlepedal)

bench on a small deck

bench on a small deck behind the sunporch

I would really like to have been able to ask the owners for the story behind the expanse of mulch at the NW corner of the property.

a vast expanse

a vast expanse

corner garden

corner garden

The mulch appeared to be something really excellent; we guessed pit-washed dairy manure, and that implied that something would be planted. The mulch expanse tied two garden areas together: a fenced veg garden and a raised ornamental garden.

mulch with path

mulch with path

To the right stood a small orchard of fruit trees.

the path, looking west

the path, looking west

stacked wall

stacked wall

steps up

steps up

center of raised garden

center of raised garden

patio

water

water

Clematis

Allan’s photo of Clematis

Allan was taken by the symmetry of this grass.

Allan was taken by the symmetry of this grass.

I wonder if the plan is to tie these two areas together with more planting.

looking east to the fenced garden

looking east to the fenced garden

looking south from the raised garden

looking south from the raised garden

The fenced garden calls to us.

The fenced garden calls to us.

veg garden

veg garden

impressive

impressive

weathered gate

weathered gate

looking over the gate

looking over the gate

admirable and productive

admirable and productive

edged with lavender

edged with lavender

Allan's lavender photo

Allan’s lavender photo

lavender edging

lavender edging

We asked the volunteer ticket checker if the owners had trouble with deer. She did not know. We speculated that while the fence would be short enough to jump, the deer might not like jumping up and also they might be put off by the lavender.

I have put the address of this garden into a note in my phone. Sometime when we are going to Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart, I want to drive by again and see if more planting has been done in that orchard area.

Interlude between gardens

When buying our ticket, I had overheard the advice that certain routes between the tour had the prettiest gardens along the street. I marked my tour map accordingly so that we drove down Marion to get to garden number six.

Here was a pretty garden!

Here was a pretty garden!

Allan noticed a bird on a tree...

Allan noticed a bird on a tree…

and got a closeup.

and got a closeup.

a striking garden with lots of verticals...

a striking garden with lots of verticals…

and beside it, a path to the beach.

right at the western edge of the town….

and one more charming garden...

and one more charming garden…

Next: the last tour garden of the 2013 Gardens by the Sea tour, and a very pleasant surprise it was for me. Also I remembered that Lorna, our friend who we had encountered at two of the previous gardens, wanted me to identify a plant for her in the final garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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from the program:  Peggy Miller’s bayside garden:    Through a gate flanked by totem poles is a formal parklike landscape. Though there is no house on this bayfront property, there is still a lot to view. Peggy’s edible garden of berries, artichokes and greens is well-protected from wildlife with the sturdiest elk and bear fence you’ll ever see. A natural path winds its way to the bay through woodlands, a meadow and an old orchard.  A surprise structure will greet you at the end of the trail. Peggy was on the tour last year; you may remember her great support and patronage to local artists and the community.  She shares her passions on two fronts this year:  First a tent with local artists demonstrating how various garden art is made.  Also, the Bikes for Books is back, a wonderful program for the area’s elementary schools that rewards reading with a chance to win a new bike.

from the road, photo by Kathleen Sayce

from the road, photo by Kathleen Sayce

This property has a few garden elements but is really a landscape on Willapa Bay.  Some photos were taken on a pre-tour walk through with organizer Nancy Allen.  Owner Peggy, a staunch supporter of local art,  had proposed the idea of having artists giving demonstrations of making garden art.

to the left of entrance

to the left of entrance

I think the reason there are unplanted plants might be because some plants were sale from Peninsula Landscape Supply.  Otherwise I am mystified!

on pre-tour day, June 24

on pre-tour day, June 24

Sheila and Debbie approaching the art demonstration area on tour day.

Sheila and Debbie approaching the art demonstration area on tour day.

Peninsula Landscape Supply had a table set up.

Peninsula Landscape Supply had a table set up.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Brian O'Connor was the musician.

Brian O’Connor was the musician.

Brian’s spouse is Renee O’Conner, the tile artist who made the beautiful obelisks in Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park and who was also performing on tour day in the Mozart Chicks at Pink Poppy Farm.

flower bed

flower bed

Tlingit art

Tlingit art

patio

patio

on tour day

on tour day

art demo schedule

I was pleased to find that our visit coincided with the garden art demo by Jan Bartlett Richardson, whose beautiful Windy Meadows Pottery garden was on last year’s tour.  She creates the most enchanting miniature clay houses that I have ever seen.

Jan Bartlett Richardson

Jan Bartlett Richardson

her garden art piece on progress

her garden art piece on progress

She will be using the fern fronds and other leaves to add impressions to the piece.

By the time Jan and I were done chatting, Sheila and Debbie had gone on the path to the bay.

path to bay

path to bay

I’m not sure all the tour guests realized the path existed if, like me when garden touring, they just skim the tour description while at each garden.

This would be very wet in the winter.

This would be very wet in the winter.

path

onward

path

path

path

into the light

into the light

Sheila and Debbie by an old orchard

catching up to Sheila and Debbie

old fruit trees

glimpsing the bay

glimpsing the bay

For those who don’t know our geography, the Long Beach Peninsula lies between two bodies of water, the Pacific Ocean to the west and Willapa Bay to the east.

to bay

bay view tree house

bay view tree house

For safety, the ladder to the treehouse was removed on tour day.

the setting, photo by Kathleen Sayce

the setting, photo by Kathleen Sayce

bay view aerie

bay view aerie

on pre tour day

on pre tour day

the bay, photo by Kathleen Sayce

the bay, photo by Kathleen Sayce

walking west again

walking west again

Back in the entrance area, we stopped to have another look at one of the landscape’s main features:  a deer and bear proof set of vegetable enclosures.

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

No critter will get in here!

No critter will get in here!  photo by Kathleen Sayce

veg fortress

veg fortress

Next:  The Painted Lady Lavender Farm…and here’s hoping it won’t take me two days to write it up because it’s a truly fabulous and enchanting garden.

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save the dateOn Sunday, Nancy, garden tour organizer, picked me up at 11 and we went to some of the gardens that will be on the Music in the Gardens tour, July 20th.  Our mission: to write descriptions for each garden.   First, a garden on the bay.  I can only show you glimpses, not big spoilers of the whole landscape!

Bayside Garden

Through a gate flanked by totem poles is a parklike landscape.  We think if the owner puts out some tables and chairs it will be a great place for people to stop and have a picnic lunch.

sneak peekThere’s no house here, just a natural landscaped setting and a path to the bay.  There’s also the sturdiest elk and bear fence you’ll ever see.

safe veg

safe veg

woodland path

woodland path

seguing to meadow path

seguing to meadow path

There’s a surprise along the way to the bayside, but I won’t reveal it till you’ve been on the tour!  After tour day, we’ll post a detailed view of each garden.

beautiful Willapa Bay

beautiful Willapa Bay

I don’t think Nancy has worked up the description for this one yet.

Marilyn’s Garden

Those who follow this blog already know about Marilyn’s garden, a wildlife friendly landscape on a city lot (50 by 100 or something like that) in Surfside.  When Nancy and I arrived on Sunday, these two were just crossing into the neighbour’s yard.  I would not be surprised if, as has happened before, the fawn was born in Marilyn’s garden among the ornamental grasses.

mother and child

mother and child

description (first draft):

Marilyn and Nancy Gorshe garden

Instead of being “deer resistant”, this garden is wildlife friendly and proof that you can coexist with deer and still have plenty of flowers.  Nancy and Marilyn call this their healing garden because while recovering from knee surgery and from cancer, they have been inspired and comforted by watching plentiful birds and a mother deer and fawns living in the garden.  Designed and planted by Tangly Cottage Gardening to be viewed and enjoyed year round with structural perennials and ornamental grasses for winter interest.

Butterfly Shores

Next we checked out a tour garden in Butterfly Shores where a meadow, just over the foredune from the ocean, is exposed to the salt wind and storms and still thrives with well chosen plants selected and planted by local gardener Diana Canto.

meadow effect

meadow effect

detail

sedum wreathDescription (first draft):

This large meadow garden on the dunes of a Butterfly Shores estate showcases the many plants that thrive in full exposure to salt, wind and winter storms.  As you wander through the meadow, notice the garden art, collected driftwood planters and sculpture, pond and fountain.  The tall fence around the back gardens protects artful bird feeders from bears, raised-bed vegetables from deer and encloses a sheltered patio.  Garden designer:  Diana Canto

intermission

I must break from the tour to show you two ocean front houses that caught my fancy.  One, across from the tour garden, is known locally as “The Microsoft House’ and is built, it is said, to withstand a tsunami.  That would be quite a feat as it is the first house in line from the shore.

the microsoft house

designed to survive

designed to survive

I was also intrigued by a narrow house further to the north.  Unfortunately, neither photo shows a feature that I liked:  Part of the house (the north end) is separate and reached by an elevated breezeway.

an unusually narrow house for such a setting

an unusually narrow house for such a setting

detail

Jo’s garden

Jo’s is another garden that readers of this blog might feel they already know well.  By the time we got there, the rain was pretty intense so Jo, Nancy and I sat inside and talked about gardening and about the garden description.  Coco sat on my lap.

Coco

Coco

I think she likes me.

I think she likes me.

Here’s a sneak peek of Jo’s from when I worked there the next day:

Jo's garden

Jo’s garden

Description (first draft):

Cottage gardens wrap around this 1896 home in a succession of outdoor rooms, each filled with breath-taking color and whimsical garden art.  Flowers and feeders provide a sanctuary for birds, which you will surely hear as you  meander on the brick path.  The welcoming deck is a haven for friends and family.  This exquisite garden will be a great inspiration to those who garden in small spaces.

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On Monday, we went to two more gardens.  We again looked at the Deemer garden which we had visited earlier in the month. I do long to show you all of it but mustn’t post spoilers for the tour!  Let me just say it is one of my top three favourites on this tour.

Deemer garden

just a hint

just a hint

birdhouses

birdhouses

perhaps more than a hint, but there is much more to see!

perhaps more than a hint, but there is much more to see!

Nancy hasn’t sent me the rough draft of the description, but it will be about the many garden areas, the shady retreats because Laura likes to get out of the hot sun, the specimen trees and  shrubs, the pond, and the original metal garden art.

Dickerson garden

We also visited a garden that was on the tour back in 2008;  I missed it then because that was the year our own garden (our former garden) was on the tour.  I have wanted to find time to see it, but life keeps slipping by.  The owners’ daughter, Madeline of Pink Poppy Bakery, says it has changed much since 2008 so there will be lots to see even if you have toured it before.

One of the prettiest chicken coops I've ever seen

One of the prettiest chicken coops I’ve ever seen

expansive beds of flowers and veg

expansive beds of flowers and veg

clever ideas

clever ideas

I photographed this and the Deemer garden extensively but can’t share all the photos yet!

description (first draft):

Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony, surrounded by mature conifers which provide privacy and some wind protection. As you enter the front gate, see swirls of lavender and rosemary filling deep perennial beds.  After circling a ring of dahlias,  head for the cutest chicken house ever, “The Imperial Chicken Palace,” which is filled with 13 gorgeous hens.  Meandering through the property you will see  2 and “1/4” poly tunnels which shelter tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and more.  Edible landscape masters, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

Peggy and Gene’s garden (Peggy Miles memorial garden)

Finally, we visited Gene’s garden where he carries on the memory of his late wife, Peggy.  Allan and I helped with the weeding and with the planting of the streetside bed.

mossy courtyard detail

mossy courtyard detail

townhouse porch

townhouse porch

description  (first draft):

This pocket-size townhouse garden was created by the late Peggy Miles and continues to thrive in her memory with tending by her husband Gene.  The front porch abounds with the charm and beauty of colorful hanging baskets and potted plants.

Narrow beds surrounding the house are planted with deer-resistant borders.  The jewel of this garden is the tucked-away courtyard in back, filled with a bold composition of shade plants and well-chosen ground covers placed in crevices between pavers and river rocks.

At the end of the courtyard is Gene’s up cycled pallet composter and a chiminea-seating area.

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Another garden that will be on the tour is the Painted Lady Lavender Farm, about which I have raved on this blog before.

Where to buy tickets:  Tickets may be purchased with cash or check one week before the tour. Credit cards are not accepted, as the ticket-selling venues are doing so on a volunteer basis.

The English Nursery
corner of Highways 101 and 103
Seaview, WA

Peninsula Landscape Supply
15289 Sandridge Rd
Long Beach, WA

Adelaide’s Books & Coffee
1401 Bay Avenue
Ocean Park, WA

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On Monday, before we went to see the official gardens, we visited one that is not on the tour this year because it is so new, but I think it is pretty special.

Nancy and Phil’s garden

'Sweet Magnolia' peas!

‘Sweet Magnolia’ peas!

just wow!

just wow!

lettuces

lettuces

veg boxes

veg boxes

eight month old flower border

eight month old flower border

Alllium albopilosum and schubertii

Alllium albopilosum and schubertii

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Maybe next year, or the year after, Nancy will feel her garden is ready for its own tour day.

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