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Posts Tagged ‘Verbena bonariensis’

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Since early summer, I had been corresponding with Terri, the organizer of the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County garden tour, ever since contacting her to confirm the date of their 2017 tour.  She had invited us to come visit her garden sometime this summer.  When she sent me these photos in late June, I knew I just had to go there.

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Today Allan and I got up early and drove two hours to the garden.  The property is named for Cynthia Markham who first claimed it in the mid 19th century.  Long before that, these shoreline acres were probably walked by the members of the Shoalwater Bay tribe.

As we approached, down a long dead end road, I exclaimed in joy.

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I knew right away, from my first sight of the garden bed lit by sunshine at the end of the road, that we were in for something special.

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to our left along the driveway

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looking back along the driveway

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The old tubs used to be used for horse watering troughs.

Two horses grazed over the fence by where we parked.  We soon learned that they are named Woody and Gus after characters in Lonesome Dove.  The white horse, Woody, is 35 years old and Gus is about 26.

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Allan’s photo

We were greeted by Ilsa, a 15 month old recently adopted rescue dog who soon became my new dear friend.  She used to be a city dog and now lives in paradise.

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Ilsa turning back at the sound of Terri’s voice.  This is the entry garden that I had seen from far up the road.

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Ilsa and her tennis ball (Allan’s photo).  To the left of the driveway is a vast field of blueberries.

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a stand of persicaria backed with phlox

Terri welcomed us and we walked slowly up toward the house, admiring the long driveway garden at every step along the way.

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to our right

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To our left. Teucrium hyrcanicum “Purple Tails’. I thought it was a salvia.  Must have!

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that face! 🙂

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to our left: Verbena bonariensis and phlox

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to our right: I was amazed to learn that this huge plant is a persicaria, Persicaria polymorpha, which I must acquire.

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to our right, smokebush smoking

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Look closely and you will see that the top of the stump is planted with teucrium.

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In this area and elsewhere, several enormous trees came down in the Great Coastal Gale of 2007.  Although she and Bill had owned the property by then for many years and had cleared the rhododendron forest from being completely overgrown by bindweed and more, and had grown  vegetables, it was not till after the gale that Terri focused on creating the ornamental garden.

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To our right: We are still walking up the driveway!

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to our left

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Ilsa got ahead of us.

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Ilsa by the pond

Waldo Pond got its name from “Where’s Waldo?”, as in looking for the frogs on the lily pads.  We only saw one today.  Terri says they hop off into the garden during the day.

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by Waldo Pond

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Some water has evaporated over our dry summer.

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Just past the pond is the house and garage.

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garage wall

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We met Terri’s spouse, Bill, and went up onto the deck where a group of chairs sat around a fireplace.

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The loon is a recurring symbol here.

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(taken later in the day)

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I was so focused on the deck’s ambience and on the bay view that it took me till I looked at my photos to see the second story skybridge going between the house and the garage.

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On the deck overlooking Grays Harbor.

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The wide deck goes all the way around the house.

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outside the kitchen window

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Allan’s photo

After walking all around the deck, Terri and Allan and I embarked upon a tour of the winding paths through the garden along the north side of the driveway.

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The paths strayed hither and yon, opening up into small clearing and vignettes.

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corylopsis leaves catching the sun

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Hydrangea and fuchsia magellanica

Terri and I had already figured out, through her reading of this blog and through email correspondence, that we share similar taste in plants.

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As you can see, Ilsa accompanied us through the garden.

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lacecap hydrangea

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Hydrangea aspera

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Hydrangea aspera

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textural Corylopsis leaves

A clearing revealed Terri’s latest project in progress, made from broken concrete.

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Hydrangea paniculata

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gorgeous

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Some garden art found at Pier 1

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Lamprocapnos scandens

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Lespedeza thunbergii (Bushclover)

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Cotinus (Smokebush)

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We walked down a slope on a paths that was easy, with non slippery mulch and nice wide steps.

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To the north is the alder wood.  You can just see the top of Terri’s head!

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I think this is Arundo donax variegata.

Terri is going off of big grasses that flop all over the place.  The one above is well behaved.

A long river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ spills down the hill, about fifty of them, planted ten years ago. By this late in the summer, some of the crocosmia has flopped over the river of blue; Terri said she is planning to thin the crocosmia for that reason.

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with a scrim of Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’

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Allan’s photo

Below the Rozanne River lies the alder wood, also part of the property and also with paths.  We did not go into the woods because Ilsa is a newly adopted dog, and Terri does not want her to learn about those paths until she is sure to return home.

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to the west, the contained (by a concrete ditch, I think) bamboo grove (Allan’s photo)

Looking to the east, we could see Woody grazing in the pasture.

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Allan’s photo

As we climbed the hill again, I admired a low wall that I had walked right by before.

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made from a natural looking manufactured block, much better looking than “cottage” blocks.

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a sit spot

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colour and texture

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persicaria

When Terri and Bill’s children were young and they had first acquired the farm and were just spending weekends there from Seattle, they got rid of the television and have used the satellite dish as a planter ever since.  It conceals the access to the septic tank.

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approaching the house again

Their grandson loves the winding secret paths.  I was thinking how amazing it must be for children to visit there, something they will remember for a lifetime.

We took a short break for glasses of water in the kitchen.

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the old farmhouse kitchen ceiling (Allan’s photo)

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kitchen window (Allan’s photo)

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Allan noticed this interesting chair! Bill pointed out they were a north wind motif.

Refreshed, we embarked upon a walk toward the beach.  On the way, we admired more garden beauty.

To the south of the driveway is an enormous field of blueberries, transplanted from a farm and now a sanctuary for birds.

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next to the driveway fence

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Terri’s newest garden bed is a collection of pollinator friendly plants.

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echinaceas and more

Because the garden is not deer fenced, Terri has found an interesting way to repel deer.  She soaks tennis balls in deer repellent (heavy on the eggs!) and puts them on stakes around the garden.

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However, do you see Ilsa in the background?  She loves tennis balls and goes after the stinky staked ones.

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This open air pavilion is where an old forge used to stand, evidenced by piles of ashes found downhill.  I think it incorporates some of the forge building or an old carriage house.

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Allan’s photo

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the pavilion

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loon carving

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Bill and I

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looking east at the blueberry field from where the beach trail begins.

The many photos from our walk on the beach will be a bonus post, tonight.

Ilsa took a short nap upon our return from the beach. (Allan’s photo)

When we returned, Bill made us delicious burgers for lunch.  He called them smash burgers, made from a ball instead of a patty and smashed under a weight so that they are crispy on both sides.  That, and a salad made with avocado and endive that was eaten too eagerly to be photographed, went down a treat.

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quite honestly the best burger I’ve ever had

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Ilsa sits nobly by while we dine at a picnic table.

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our view toward Waldo pond

As I gazed from the picnic table to the pond, one small conifer shone like a golden torch.  It is not as evident in the photo as it was to my eyes.  You can see it next to an orb toward the left, above; it is Thuja platycladus ‘Weedom’.

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peach and apple cobbler for dessert

Soon after we had arrived, we had learned (to my vast relief!) that Bill and Terri share our thoughts about current events. That made for sympatico lunchtime conversation, which is a great comfort these days.

After lingering over our meal, we took a walk down the driveway to see the horses before saying goodbye.

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Some flowers on the way:

Verbena bonariensus

Persicaria (Allan’s photo)

Phlox (Allan’s photo)

The glorious Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’ again. Terri says it holds its colour for a long time. (Allan’s photo)

Buddleia (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Barn wall (Allan’s photo)

Terri and Gus

Gus enjoying carrots

Here comes Woody. (Allan’s photo)

Woody is mostly blind. Terri tossed down some carrots for him but Gus got them first.

Woody moved away. (Allan’s photos)

Later that night, Woody got apple peels to make up for it.

As we got into our van to leave, I noticed one more cool little tree.

Allan’s photo

It is Staphylea pinnata (European Bladdernut), one that is new to me.

We drove off from an idyllic, perfect visit with seedpods on the dashboard.


If you are smitten with this garden, you’ll have a chance to see it next July on the Grays Harbor Master Gardener tour. It is a garden I will be revisiting in my mind many times and will find well worth the drive to visit in another season.

Tonight’s bonus post: Our midday walk on the beach below the garden.

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Sunday, 20 September 2015

My gardening energy is most definitely revived with autumnal weather.  I will admit I had been looking forward to a rainy day to stay indoors and read.  Surprising sunshine got me out working on a garden project instead.

This much had fallen overnight.

This much rain had fallen overnight.


The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

I wanted to weed back in the bogsy wood but a brisk wind stopped me.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Meanwhile, I pondered where I could make a new strawberry bed as I would like to expand my scree garden to all around the boat.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.


I want more scree.

I want more scree.


scree garden edge expanded

scree garden edge expanded

Just as I finished edging the scree garden, enough rain arrived so that I could spend the rest of the day indoors catching up on this blog.  (As soon as staycation begins, sometime in November, the blog will take second place to reading days.)

Monday, 21 September 2015

I continued to sleep poorly.  My mind is haunted with sadness for a former friend whose loved one has died.  The door of friendship was closed firmly and decisively (from the other side) making it difficult to reach out with comfort and yet my thoughts are with her because I have rarely known a couple so together-y for 49 years of marriage, especially after retirement.  They even went to have their hair cut together.  The best I could come up was to post the wonderful song All of the Good Things on “Our Ilwaco” Facebook page as a sign of sympathy.  While an atheist probably cannot picture the kind of afterlife with wings as described in the first verse, the rest of the song speaks so eloquently of memory, as do the family photos in the video (which are the family photos of the songwriter, Amanda Birdsall):

“I heard your voice today
in this old machine
it made me remember
all of the good things.”

I once made a memory garden for the widow of a couple who were as closely bonded.  One memorial that I incorporated was the Jewish custom of each visitor leaving a small rock on top of a larger one in memory of their lost friend, as in a cemetery pebbles are placed on the gravestone in memory by all who visit.

From the blog I wrote about that garden:

memory

I leave this pebble here in memory.

I leave this pebble here in memory.

Also from that blog entry:

books

Because I just don’t have the ability to envision a guaranteed afterlife, I find the Angelo Patri quotation to be particularly comforting.

Hard work in the garden focused my mind on pruning and weeding.  I worked back in the bogsy wood despite a somewhat disconcerting wind because, after a whole summer of wind, I am tired of putting that area off.

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed


by the bogsy woods swale, before

by the bogsy woods swale, before


after

after


I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale "streambed".

I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale “streambed”.


Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.

Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.


long shadows in the bogsy wood

long shadows in the bogsy wood


outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.

outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.


I refined the salmonberry tunnel.

I refined the salmonberry tunnel.


view north from the bogsy wood

view north from the bogsy wood

I even had time to work on a bed that has escaped my attention all summer:

east side garden, a big mess, before

east side garden, a big mess, before


after

after


Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Meanwhile, Allan had been working on a project of his own: making strips of wood to top the new arbour in the front garden:

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making strips

making strips

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painting them

painting them


a time-consuming task

a time-consuming task

Outside his shop, he photographed this big fat flower bud:

on Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

on Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

Before dusk I took a walkabout around the garden.

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy woods behind

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy wood behind


I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.

I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.


The leaves do smell wonderful.

The leaves do smell wonderful.


Clematis 'Rooguchi'

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’


Kniphofia 'Earliest of All' (from Todd)

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ (from Todd)


I remembered to take some macros!

I remembered to take some macros!

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Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)

Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)


Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

I went to pick a Cripp’s Pink apple and look who I found.

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Cripp’s Pink (Pink Lady) with Pacific Tree Frog


I did not pick that one.

I did not pick that one.

I am glad I don’t have the competition for apples that my former client Ann has.  A couple of days ago, she posted these photos of her apple trees in her garden a few blocks uphill from me:

photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


bear3

photo by Ann Saari


the three bears, photo by Ann Saari

the three bears (mom and two cubs), photo by Ann Saari

I also realized that Mr. Tootlepedal might enjoy seeing this card that I have pinned to a bulletin board.  It looks very much like Mr. Grumpy.

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Next: If all goes well, we will accomplish some more fall projects at work this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, September 21, 2013

A beautiful day was the last sort of day I expected.  The forecast had called for rain, some wind, thunderstorms, and small hail.  I expected to sleep and then get caught up on the computer.  Instead, I found myself walking down to the Saturday Market at ten fifteen!

evidence of yesterday's rain

evidence of yesterday’s rain

Just as I took the above photo two houses east of ours, I saw Devery and Tuffy coming toward me on their way to the market, so we walked down together.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

Mr. TuffMan

Mr. TuffMan

Devery bought some delicious produce from De Asis.  The sight of okra took her back to her childhood on Saint Kitt’s Island.

at De Asis Produce

at De Asis Produce

Then we parted ways as I went on through the length of the market to take more photos for the Discover Ilwaco page.

More produce from De Asis Farm:

peppers

peppers hot

and sweet

and sweet

The market had about half as many booths as usual.  I bought a hoodie from Blue Crab Graphics…a purple zippered one with Kelly’s design one of our lighthouses on it.  Kelly told me that she had set up in the rain and many vendors had not come.  They would be missing a beautiful day.

new hoodie!

new hoodie!

Further on, the English Nursery booth

Further on, the English Nursery booth

reflective pool by the Shoalwater Cove booth

“reflective pool” by the Shoalwater Cove booth

The pedestrian road called Waterfront Way, which is the market promenade on Saturdays, has a slope toward the middle which provides good reflections after rain.

another booth reflected

another booth reflected

The basket from The Basket Case Greenhouse still looks wonderful in front of the Don Nisbett Art Gallery.  Don waters it frequently and lavishly.

Don's basket

Don’s basket

The ones by the Port Office are good, too, although not as lavishly trailing without Don’s extra watering.

Port Office

Port Office

It’s just as well they don’t trail more or they would hide our garden underneath.  (Some of the garden plants also came from The Basket Case:  Eryngiums, Agastaches, Santolinas, Lavenders, Nepeta, and Cosmos and Salvia Viridis from The Planter Box.)

At the Pink Poppy Bakery booth, Madeline was selling some treats to Jim and Jet Neva.  Jim, great friend of port landscaping, may have retired but is still doing a lot for the port.  He was there to put up the second warning flag for tomorrow’s weather (two red triangle flags equal a gale with winds of 39-54 mph).

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

I got two Guinness chocolate cupcakes and some shortbread to share with Allan later, then  checked out the westernmost curbside garden on Howerton.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

And walked past the boatyard…

boatyard

And on up First Avenue, checking the city planters along the way.

the colourful Portside Café

the colourful Portside Café

My destination was a late breakfast at Olde Towne.  Their window display foretells the imminent arrival of autumn.

at Olde Towne

at Olde Towne

In the way of small towns, I ended up having my meal with our client Ann and local masseuse and baker Diane.

Meanwhile, unbeknownst to me, Allan had woken up an hour later than me (lucky to get good sleep!) and gone to the market himself, where he met our friend Donna, her new puppy, Blue, and…some pirates.

Little Blue!

Little Blue!

Donna and the pirates.

Donna and the pirates.

This one looks familiar.

This one looks familiar.

I am sure Queen La De Da had something to do with all this because it was some sort of significant pirate day.  (Talk Like a Pirate Day, I’ll bet.)

While sitting at Olde Towne,  I got a text from Donna that she had Blue over at Judy and Tom’s house.  I had finished my breakfast panini, gulped my coffee, and excused myself in haste so I could hustle home and meet the little pup.

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Tiny little Blue looked lost in the lawn, which Tom had been unable to mow as often as usual due to weather.

Baby Blue

Baby Blue

After a long visit, during which Allan ambled down to join us (having just returned from the market), I harvested a few things from the garden.  I knew the pole of purple beans in the garden boat would most likely tip over in the wind.

long purple beans

long purple beans

Inspired by the meal yesterday at Himani Indian Cuisine, Allan wanted to make raita.  Maybe because I had found and emailed him a recipe.  So cilantro and mint and a cucumber were harvested for that.  And tomatoes for me and Judy.

The garden looked unkempt but I took most of the afternoon trying to muster the energy to weed three small sections.

sunflowers by the east fence

sunflowers by the east fence

Allan pointed out that when I had sent him out to retrieve Sheila’s hanging vase from  the shed wall after dark the previous evening,  I had neglected to tell him that the photo that reminded me of the vase also showed a big spider.  He noticed the spider when reading the blog later that night!

and the beautiful hanger made by Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery)

vase from New Leaf Pottery…with spider

In the dark, he had gotten tangled up in the web.  Today, the spider was rebuilding.

determination

determination

I miss the vase but it cannot be up there during autumn winds.

A walk around the garden was in order just in case the predicted wind was terribly bad.

Aconitum in back garden

Aconitum in back garden

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

a very nice daylily

a very nice daylily

heavily flowering Fuchsias everywhere

profusely flowering Fuchsias everywhere

From the south end of the garden, I could see the two flags now flying over the port..

gale warning

gale warning

But we had only the slightest breeze and the evening was warm.

late afternoon light

late afternoon light, looking north from the bogsy wood

My usual garden companions had followed me all around.

Smokey

Smokey

(You can see how the back lawn is mostly creeping buttercup.)

Mary

Mary

She's Smokey's mom.

She’s Smokey’s mom.

Suddenly it seemed essential to have the first and possibly last campfire of the season!  I had checked last month with two VIFs (very important local firefighters) and learned that despite a county burn ban it was ok to have a small campfire in one’s own town garden.  Work, and blogging in the evening, had seemed to get in the way of having a fire until now.

At first the wood was steamy from yesterday’s rain.

steamy

steamy

But then it caught very nicely and we had hot dogs and smores for dinner.

a real campfire

a real campfire

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Smokey thought the fire was a great idea.

my shoulder cat

my shoulder cat

During our fire time, not a breath of wind stirred the danger tree almost right overhead.  By next year’s campfire season, we will have dealt with this tree, if the storms don’t do it for us.  Then we won’t have to wait for completely windless nights, as they are rare here.

a quiet danger tree

a quiet danger tree

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch's Sig Hansen on the bottle.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch’s Sig Hansen on the bottle.

I had sent last minute messages to Kelly and to Jenna before our spontaneous campfire.  Jenna did not get the message til the next day, and Kelly had to do something else.  We knew Judy and Tom were in for the evening, so it was just me and Allan and the cats…for most of the evening.

no company!

no company!

Light fades behind the alder grove.

Light fades behind the alder grove.

I had left two of the gates open in case Jenna and Don or Kelly showed up.  When it was good and dark and we were letting the fire die down, I looked over Allan’s shoulder and within three feet behind him stood a deer.  I just said “Oh my god!” while I considered whether or not a photo would capture the event and decided that the flash would make everything look too harsh.  “What, WHAT?” Allan exclaimed; “Don’t just say “Oh my GOD! What is it!?”  He later asked me if I had seen any horror movies lately.  I finally told him what was RIGHT behind him and stood up, and the deer scurried away down one of the paths.  A keystone cops in the dark chase ensued with two humans, two flashlights, two open gates and a deer that kept going round and round the dark paths.  We finally got it herded out the side gate to Nora’s driveway, and Allan made a circuit of the yard to make sure the deer had not brought a buddy.

The whole experience, including the deer’s visit, was so enjoyable I wish that we had done it more often.  Now we can only hope for a nice October evening with no wind (because of Danger Tree) to have one more campfire with company.

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I continue to review of Klipsan Beach Cottages gardens.  I do have the most photos from this garden because I had them already uploaded to the KBC Facebook page.  The plant assortments reflects many of the favourites that we also had planted in other gardens.

1 August

Cosmos atrosanguineus, smells just like chocolate!

Cosmos atrosanguineus, smells just like chocolate!

cosmos

Cosmos

crocosmia

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Salvia patens

Saliva patens backed with Helichrysum ‘Limelight’

clean up

We dug out some old Tradescantia along the fenced garden path because it always looked tatty.

sweet peas

sweet peas

Coreopsis 'Jive' with Allium and painted sage

Coreopsis ‘Jive’ with Allium, Coreopsis verticillata, and painted sage

Stipa gigantea, our favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, our favourite ornamental grass

lily

lily

8 August

in the fenced garden

in the fenced garden

Sanguisorba....originally from Dan Hinkley's Heronswood.

Sanguisorba….originally from Dan Hinkley’s Heronswood.

garden art

garden art:  Mary does not enforce this fee 😉

garden with view of cottages

garden with view of cottages

Agapanthus (lily of the Nile)

Agapanthus (lily of the Nile)

I always had a terrible time remembering the name of Agapanthus until I associated it with “It’s a mystery; Agatha Christie!”

lily

lily

lily

lily

I don’t know the names of most of the lilies because they came from divisions from my mother’s old garden.

lily

lily

This intensely fragrant lily bloomed for weeks.

This intensely fragrant lily bloomed for weeks.

15 August

lily

Lily speciosum rubrum

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

Sometimes I photograph the same plants each week to show how long they are in bloom.

Strobilanthus atropurpureus

Strobilanthes atropurpureus

For some reason I also had a terrible time remembering the name Strobilanthes until I associated with being showy and blooming late = strobe light!  It is perfectly hardy here and blooms in late summer with curved and frilled blue and white tubes.

Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

22 August

Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Veronicastrum

Veronicastrum and Lilies

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

30 August

honeysuckle

honeysuckle

just outside the deer fence

just outside the deer fence

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Climbing rose

Climbing rose

Joseph's Coat rose by the garage

Joseph’s Coat rose by the garage

Sumac 'Tiger Eyes' by the house

Sumac ‘Tiger Eyes’ by the house

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

lily

lily

lily speciosum rubrum

lily speciosum rubrum

Timmy...or Sarah.

Timmy…or Sarah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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