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Posts Tagged ‘water feature’

Saturday, 7 September 2019

When we had discovered the Castle Rock public gardens two years ago on a drive to Evan Bean’s garden, we had just missed the annual tour by a month.  Last year, the tour didn’t happen, so I’d been looking forward to it for two years!

We left Ilwaco at 8 AM and arrived at the first garden, east of Castle Rock, just before 11 AM.

The Gardens at Stillmeadows

The garden name had made me eager to ask if the garden owners were fans of Gladys Taber, a favourite author of mine who wrote memoirs about her home called Stillmeadow. No, Still Meadows Lane is the name of the road along which you will find this large garden and overnight retreat.  You can read here about how the owners transformed “a mess of brush and blackberries” into a rambling garden acreage.

As planned in advance, we met Debbie, Dana, and Dawn from up north as we arrived and as they were leaving for the next garden.

me, Bailey, Debbie, Dawn, Dana

This was the only time we saw them all day because they were running an hour ahead of us on the tour.  We had a good but short visit (and they gave me flower pots and some garden decor, thank you!).  Allan and I then walked up the hill toward the garden, guided by our new friend, Bailey.

The gift shop, to the right on the way up the road, was closed for the season.

Now I so wish I had my grandma’s old treadle sewing machine.  (I sold it before leaving Seattle 26 years ago; it was so heavy) Something like this idea is genius for making a window box without attaching hardware to the window frame area….or just the idea of using something other than a standard window box.

To our left, we followed the sound to a waterfall.

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
a bit further uphill

The first of two houses is a manufactured home similar to ours. (Of course, I loved that.)

It has an intricate front porch arbour.

Between the first and second house is the entrance to a secret garden.

Allan’s photo

We continued to explore the entrance garden on the way to the retreat office, located in the second house.

one of four elusive kitties

Take a drippy paint can and turn it into a vase with same colour flowers.
Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

A large seating area near the office would be perfect for dining al fresco while staying in one of the retreat rooms.

We met the friendly garden owners and then wended our separate ways down the hill into the lower gardens.

path to the sauna

A path gravel worked its way gently downhill.

looking back

Allan’s photo

The tour was perhaps not as well attended as it should have been.  I saw only two other people in the garden, a couple who delightedly commented about the imagination required to create such a space.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
lower right, above, seed heads of a favourite of mine, eryngiums
Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’, one of my favourite late summer bloomers

At the bottom of the hill awaited an impressive stand of sunflowers, cosmos, and zinnias.  I love zinnias but don’t seem to have enough heat to grow them at the beach.

 

A dahlia garden came next as one turns to another path back into the lower garden.

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo

Looking back at the dahlias…

Past the dahlias, a bridge over a river of blue fescue leads to a reflective pond.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Chickens!

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

That must be the back of the sauna.

Past the picket fence, a path wound sinuously through the woods….

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo

The woodsy path emerged at the base of steps leading up next to a waterfall.

Allan’s photo of a clever break in the railing as it crosses a stream.

Even though the stairs were easy enough, with a sturdy railing, let’s go back around the long way, retracing some of our steps to see more, including a closer look at a grove of Acer griseum (paperbark maple).

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
returning to the upper level (Allan’s photo)

As we were leaving, we met Rosemary from St Helens (a lower Columbia River town in Oregon), who had sent me a beautiful greeting card after happening upon my plant sale last May.  What a lucky encounter today.

Rosemary and me

I do hope we meet again.

And I hope to visit The Gardens at Stillmeadows again in late spring or early summer.

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 31 March 2019

Allan had gone boating.

My mission was to get enough compost to mulch the battered soil around the new water feature….which has leaked another half an inch or so.

I need to make some driftwood or other access points for frogs to get in there.

My hope for mulch lay in compost bin one.

compost critter

I got four red wheelbarrows of coarsely sifted compost.

Bin one empty:

Center bed is better now, but I still need more mulch.

When I have time, I can surely get more from bins two through four, especially the lower half of bin four, which has been sitting the longest.

While gardening today and yesterday, I thought at times about gardening partners, with some envy about couples I perceive as working hard together on their entire gardens.  The only couples who come to mind who I imagine doing this compatibly are the owners of The Bayside Garden and Mirabel Osler and her late husband, based on her book A Gentle Plea for Chaos.  (Even those two had a somewhat traditional division of labor, with him doing the mowing.)

In our garden, Allan now does the mowing (although at first I did, before the garden got big enough to needs lots of work).  He has his garden, on the east side of the house, small enough to be kept perfect, and I have the rest…not a half and half arrangement like Ciscoe and Mary Morris’ evenly divided and competitive garden.  Unlike that equally garden-obsessed pair, Allan does have other interests.  However, I can count on him to help whenever asked and to build cool things like my greenhouse lean to.  Longtime readers have seen much photo proof of his efforts.

In two previous relationships of mine, Bryan had no interest in gardening…until years after we broke up, when he developed a passion for collecting bamboo.  And he was a pot farmer, which I suppose counts as gardening but was not something I was involved in at all.

I was not obsessed with gardening during the five years when Bryan and I were together, although I did try to care for my garden that had once been my grandmother’s. Bryan and his friend Owen planted a parking strip tree for meyeads before I turned the parking strip into a garden.

Chris had no interest in the garden, to the point where I one day gave him an ultimatum, that I would no longer read any of his writing until he started to appreciate my art, the garden itself.  He did listen.  His next spouse was also a gardener.  Now, many years later, he has an allotment patch.  If he had been such a gardener in 1990, we would probably still be together!

(I must also point out the irony that both Bryan and Chris were completely opposed to having children while in their 20s and 30s, and both changed their minds in their mid 40s, very much to my disgruntlement at the time.)

After I became an obsessed gardener, Bryan built a wonderful fence for me at the back of my Seattle garden, just because he was a great friend.

And Bryan and his mum Louise helped prune my pear tree and pick the fruit each year.

Robert was my co-gardener both at work and in the garden.  Even though I did the plant collecting, I remember us gardening together at home and even have photos to prove it.

From our Seattle garden:

Robert watering
Robert building a twig arbour
Robert pruning the pear tree, early spring
Making our Ilwaco garden, 1995

However, I am content to garden large expanses of my current garden mostly on my own.  I get to make the decisions without a lot of argy bargy, have help to call for if something is to big for me to handle alone, and I am well aware that not all gardening partnerships are idyllic—especially with someone like Walter.

This evening, I finished reading We Made a Garden by Margery Fish, whose spouse was the worst example I have ever read of the kind of gardening partner that you do not want to have.

I did remove the label, and I put it back on.

I found a perfect essay about Margery and Walter right here on Slate, titled A Gardener’s Revenge, which is just what I was thinking while reading the book.

I remembered what Ann Lamott wrote: “If people wanted you to write warmly about them, they should have behaved better.”

All about Walter:

 

When she wanted to plant in amongst paving, “Walter would not have [that] at any price. I was allowed a few very small holes…. Time has improved things and a lot of the …cement has become loosened…helped…by a crowbar.”

He insisted on blue clematis and ridiculed the red ones she liked. “I was warned I was wasting my time.” He referred to them as “your red clematis” until they began to do well, and then they were “ours”.

He would not let her have a wisteria….  “Since Walter died, I have cut down the ampelopsis.  He could never be persuaded to have a wisteria because he said they would take too long to flower.  Now I have two, and they flowered two years after I planted them.”

He hovered and criticized.

I am reminded of how my mother, after my father died, even though she missed him dreadfully, soon confessed to me that “it’s kind of a relief to not get made fun of” for her gardening efforts.

Margery’s stonework “did not meet with approval.”  Walter liked to “gaze with horror” at what she had done the day before and make snide remarks.

He insisted on planting pole roses and gaudy dahlias in the area she had planned out, so that she had to work her planting around them.

“He never worried about treading on my plants, or smothering them with the great piles of earth that were thrown up, so I had to be careful not to plant anything” near the dahlias.

Margery wanted a year round garden but was “not allowed to plant many out of season plants” because all Walter wanted was a summer garden.

I found this the most telling paragraph of all:

(She was frightened of harming her little plants so dotted the manure around carefully.)

Oh, but wait, there’s more:

You might say that there must be another side to the story. I say what a horrible, dreadful man. After he died, and the pole roses and big showy dahlias went away, and cracks were made in the paving for Margery to plant as she liked, she became a famous garden writer and a great inspiration to cottage style gardeners of today.  It was in watching Carol Klein’s wonderful Life in a Cottage Garden series that I learned of Margery’s books.  I now intend to read all of them.

We Made a Garden is invaluable for its plant lists and descriptions and I must get myself a copy of my very own, maybe with this lovely cover:

Postscript: Two days later, in Tales from Titchmarsh, I found Alan T. expounding on the same topic:

…planted and where….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 14 July 2018

Colorful Coastal Gardens tour

 Grayland, Washington

presented by the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County

Our ticket to the tour is a beautiful booklet with photos and a write up about each garden.

Each gardener chose a quotation to go with the garden description.

I must give credit to The Outlaw Gardener for the idea of using snippets of the garden descriptions throughout these posts.

As you can see, we were close to salt water all day.

Charles and Hans’ garden, Grayland

Gardeners’ quotation: “Gardening requires a lot of water, mostly in the form of perspiration.” -Lou Erickson

From the description, I expected a low maintenance and perhaps rather sparse garden.  We were delighted to find instead a lush but wisely planted garden of great beauty.

Allan’s photo

Each garden has a poster with a list of which sustainable garden practices were employed.

Hans and Charles’ garden

Our greeter and ticket stamper had on a most delightful garden hat.

A docent, neither Charles nor Han (Allan’s photo)

up the driveway (Allan’s photo)

looking back to the entry

When one of this gardener team, Charles, decided to remove a patch of lawn to install a dry river bed, he was responding to the summer drought situation this coastal region experiences. Except for small plantings, this part of the garden is watered only by rainfall.”

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

on up the driveway past the two story garage

along the side of the garage

handsome brunnera and enviably perfect hostas

farther up the shady border

Allan’s photo

across the front lawn to the sunny side

Allan’s photo

on the front porch

green and lovely table setting

At the back of the garage, on the shady side again:

Allan’s photo

looking back

from whence we came

The path around the side of the house beckons.

looking back along the side pathway

entering the back garden

Allan’s photo

“The garden behind the home invites guests into a private peaceful space of manicured lawn edged in stone block.  This formal setting contrasts with the informal dry river bed in front of the home.”

straight ahead

to my right

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

“The Lazy Gardener”

looking back

gorgeous tawny achillea

behind: the garden shed

Allan’s photo

Charles identifies a plant. (Allan’s photo)

Linaria (toadflax) was perhaps the plant in question. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan and I almost always walk through the garden by different routes and at a different pace, crossing paths occasionally, so it always interests me when we take almost the same photo.

Allan, in blue shirt, is in the above photo.

Allan’s photo

looking back

further back garden exploration

Here is the entry, through a hedge, to the field where the vegetable garden resides.

entry to the vegetable garden area (Allan’s photo)

“The vegetable garden continues to the rear of the formal garden and slips over the hillside to the raised beds designed for efficiency of labor.”

Allan’s photo

“Sand was the challenge to overcome. Compost and mulching was the answer.”

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The next door neighbour also had a vegetable garden.

Next door (Allan’s photo)

What a great start to the tour!

 

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Saturday, 23 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Soul Garden, Edmonds

…flowering currants and lots of small Japanese maples to flow and weep over the boulders.  Hellebores bloom in winter, and rodgersia send up their plumes of pink flowers in springtime.  This garden was featured in Val Easton’s NW Living Column, April 10. 2015.

Allan’s photo

the front garden

entering the back garden

Allan’s photo

 

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the kitchen garden, above the little waterfalls

Allan’s photo

an easy path above the waterfall

looking down into the little stream

waterfall (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

the pond

Allan liked the hose reel firmly mounted to the house.

I loathe free standing hose reels; this looks much easier.

at the back of the garden

tour guests consider the labyrinth

testing

I mean no disrespect when I write that someone would find it hard going to get me to walk a labyrinth instead of either gardening or reading a book.  Maybe I should have tried it instead of lurking around the edges.  You can read more about the gardener’s philosophy of labyrinth walking here, beautifully described.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Fortunately for me, there was an easier path than this.

interlude

On the way to the next garden, Allan photographed this seemingly abandoned greenhouse.

I wonder what the story is here.

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Garden Two: “Colorful and Creative”

Every garden tour has one garden that becomes my favourite.  Gina and Jeff’s garden is one that could be my favourite of many tours.

I was thrilled just by looking at it across the street!

Before we crossed the road, we encountered Wendy and Bill, whose garden had been my favourite on last year’s tour.  Since then, I’d learned that for many years they owned the boat Aallotar which I often see at the Port of Ilwaco.  I longed for Aallotar stories but garden touring won out for everyone.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

closer

 

closer

walk to the front porch

Allan’s photo

wooden window box looks like copper

We finally made it to the check in table!  We could already hear the sound of the river and realized that the garden, while huge, is long and narrow because the river is just past the house and down a steep drop off.

The river sounded wonderful.

a double sort of curb holding the edge of the garden; that lawn is far below

The drop off at the edge of the garden is steep and dramatic.

Allan’s photo

garden creator Gina’s friendly little dog (Allan’s photo)

This cat was also getting attention. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

I felt faint just looking at this path between the house and the edge. Folks with a good head for heights breezed along it.

Allan’s photo

Gina must have a great head for heights; she had picked every bad leaf off of the statuesque hollyhocks.

Allan’s photo

hollyhocks below the edge

I decided to explore the garden that stretched expansively from the other side of the garage.

back wall of garage

Allan’s photo

This was to cover up some sort of unattractive utilitarian thing. (Allan’s photo)

The long, narrow garden lay on both sides of the house between the road and the drop off to the river.  We began with the longest area, to the left of the house.

a sit spot (Allan’s photo)

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on the side of the garage

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detail

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looking down the expansive lawn

Because this garden is a work in progress, I have a feeling that eventually all of these beds will be as full as the ones right around the house.

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looking back

Squash and big healthy tomatoes grew in the roadside bed.  Someone commented about the fertile farmland valley silt in this area.

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Allan’s photo

One of the folks strolling toward me said (because of my knee brace, cane, and sore heel related limp), “Nothing stops you from garden touring, does it?!”

The garden beds on the river side go right up to the cliff edge.

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right on the edge….I wondered if eventually these trees would go.

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I would have to crawl on my belly to weed up to that edge!

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Allan’s photo

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plants clinging to the very edge of the steep drop off!

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Allan’s photo

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looking down (Allan’s photo)

I tip my gardener’s cap to the bold gardener who weeds along that curving edge.

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Most of the beds are more safely inland.

We turned back and walked toward the house.

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garden tour guests enjoying a sit spot

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peach tree near the garage

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a perfect rose

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I am now thinking about how this garden does not seem bothered by deer.

When Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) toured this garden just after we did, she especially noticed the burned tree (which went right over my head).

burnedtree

photo by Ann Amato-Zorich, who says “Burned tree. Nature’s own shou sugi ban.”

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rustic woodsy planter

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from another angle

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and another….an idea I am going to emulate.

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Allan’s photo

To reach the other side of the garden, I went along the front of the house.

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Brick front porch wrapped front and right side of the house.

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front garden

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looking out from the porch

On the right side of the entry porch, the brick porch narrowed and became L shaped.  Its decor was so fascinating that I could have spent an hour there.

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This area had a concrete floor and a high roof with a chandelier and a skylight.

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story of my life!

I could almost weep with delight over all of these artful vignettes.

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Just off the porch was a waterfall pond.

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Going around the corner of the house, we found another tiny shady pool.

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Allan’s photo

Around the corner at the back of the house, we passed through an arbour to a greenhouse.

We failed to step back and get a long shot.  Ann kindly provided us with this:

greenhouse.jpg

photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sink fountain

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Allan’s photo

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in the greenhouse

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We recently saw someone making a cool light fixture like this on a tiny house show.

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in the greenhouse

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in the greenhouse

Near the greenhouse, steps and a path go down to the river level.

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looking down

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plantings on the upper bank (Allan’s photo)

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from the path going down; garden creator Gina in view (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

We learned later that the rock retaining wall was new this past year, and Gina has begun planting it up.

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Allan’s photo

I was still up on the top level by the greenhouse.

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the back porch and sunroom

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the other side of the path I couldn’t do!

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Looking down again, I could see a great temptation for reaching the river level:

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The kitty was there!

Someone told me that an easy access driveway was available at the other end of the garden.  I made my way in that direction.

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by the greenhouse, a basket ready for berries

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past the greenhouse

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looking back at the house and L shaped porch

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an easy road, with a greeter

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kitty welcoming Allan to the river road

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Allan’s photo

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along the river bank

I learned later that the river causes much destruction along this bank during a stormy winter.  The lawn survives!

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looking up the newly cleared area to the greenhouse

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The river made a beautiful sound.

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Allan’s photo

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new rock wall with tour guest for scale

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Look at the edge on that lawn.  Allan noticed that all the bare ground was weed free and carefully raked.

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the river bank, which likely gets flooded in rainy winters

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the sound of water always in the background

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the path down from below

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Allan’s photo

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We made our way back up the easy road to the top and appreciated the garden for awhile longer.

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a natural hose hanger

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Look who we met arriving just as we were leaving!

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Dave, Melissa, Todd, Pam (downtown Seaside gardener)

They would be one garden behind us all the way.  Ann and Evan arrived just after this photo was taken. We should have just slowed down and toured with them, because they would notice things that we had missed.  I am always afraid of running out of time, so on we went to the next garden.

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I’m thinking how much I loved this garden and that I did not want to leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 18 July 2015

just a reminder that it is almost time for the Music in the Gardens Tour

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival and music programs in local schools

ticket tour map

ticket tour map

Garden 2: Lynda’s Garden

In this one-year old garden, all of the decks, fences, gates, and a unique water feature were designed and built by the owner.  Beside the lawn, a stage holds inset planters with aromatherapy plants such as jasmine, gardenias, and pinks, and is shaded by sails that dance in the wind.  A view of Loomis Lake is framed across the street through well-placed fences and a multi-grafted espaliered apple tree.

from the street

from the street

Our friend (and pro mower) Ed Strange had recommended that this garden be on the tour, and the day before he came over and mowed and trimmed the grass, saying “I got you into this!”  It’s just around the corner from our friend J9’s house, and when Allan and I went to scout it out for the tour, I wondered why I had not noticed it when I walked from J9’s to the lakeshore park.  Then I realized that was because my walk to the lakeshore park was over a year ago, and Lynda has done all this gardening and carpentry since then.  When Garden Tour Nancy and I went back to see the garden together, Nancy was thrilled at Lynda’s can-do attitude.  “The tour is July 18th?  Great, I have a month to get everything done!”

from our June 18th visit: one of Lynda's two adorable dogs.  The other is a big one.

from our June 18th visit: one of Lynda’s two adorable dogs. The other is a big one.

one

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

flag2

flag

front

front garden from the deck

front garden from the deck

Lynda's water feature and privacy screen

Lynda’s water feature and privacy screen

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

water3

IMG_9697

July 3rd

screen

on the deck: coffee and cookies

on the deck: coffee and cookies

from a pre-tour visit on July 3rd

from a pre-tour visit on July 3rd

deck2

Lynda, Kathleen, and Allan

Lynda, Kathleen, and Allan

deck3

deck is on east side of house

deck4

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Here's the photo I was taking.

Here’s the photo I was taking.

more refreshments

more refreshments

wine

deck5

privacy screen, all planted and built in the past year

privacy screen, all planted and built in the past year

view of Loomis Lake over the privacy fence

view of Loomis Lake over the privacy fence

espaliered tree

espaliered tree

stone path

stone path

the fence from outside, photo by Kathleen Shaw

the fence from outside, photo by Kathleen Shaw

view of park kitty corner across the street

view of park, positioned diagonally across the street

peekaboo lake view

peekaboo lake view

After getting a big pile of rip rap dumped on site, Lynda sat by the pile and threw the rocks into place one by one.

After getting a big pile of rip rap dumped on site, Lynda sat by the pile and threw the rocks into place one by one.

south side of house

from the south side of house

south2

south facing deck

south

the firepit garden on June 18th

the fire bowl garden on June 18th, with lumber for a project

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

signs

tour day

tour day

tour day: photo by Kathleen Shaw

tour day: photo by Kathleen Shaw

the stage on June 18th

the stage on June 18th

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

stage on tour day

stage on tour day

music in the garden

music in the garden

Inset planters hold fragrant plants.

Inset planters hold fragrant plants.

Jennifer Goodenberger

Jennifer Goodenberger

Jennifer Goodenberger

Jennifer Goodenberger

Just remember this was all built in the past year.

Just remember this was all built in the past year.

the dog run door on June 18th

the dog run door on June 18th

tour day

tour day

As we departed for the next garden, we took some last photos driving past the house.

front

front

south side

south side

south side

south side

south side of stage

south side of stage

Ed Strange told Lynda that her garden was a “Neverland garden”.  She thought, “How nice, he means it’s a garden for children or fairies to enjoy” and he said that what he meant was that she will always have a new project and therefore never be done.

I so admire Lynda’s carpentry and design skills and the stage in particular.  Her garden is one that would intrigue me to take a closer look if I glimpsed its intricacies as I walked by.

interlude

Lynda’s garden is on the east side of the Tides West neighborhood, and the next tour garden is on the west side.  We like when tour gardens are close to each other.  After crossing the highway, on the way to the next garden, we passed this garden which is one that I would like to explore:

looks interesting!

looks interesting!

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for Water Music Festival

Goelz Garden

photo 2

We had driven right by this garden many times without realizing what a beautiful landscape is  there.  The Goelzes do all the work themselves and have created a peaceful, spacious space for wandering and entertaining.

as one enters through the front gate

as one enters through the front gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a sign on the porch

a sign on the porch

around the side of the house

around the north side of the house

north side garden bed

north side garden bed

looking due north to a long pergola

looking due north to a long pergola

dahlias along the pergola

dahlias along the pergola

pergola4

pergola3

To the north of the pergola, a Eucalyptus grove leans gracefully over the music tent.

To the north of the pergola, a Eucalyptus grove leans gracefully over the music tent.

When Nancy and I pre-toured the garden, we were told that one or more of the eucalyptus trees had fallen in a winter windstorm years ago and then had regrown from the base.

The music at the Goelz garden was performed by the Mozart Chicks.

music

“The Mozart Chicks started as a duo and multiplied into a trio, then a quartet, and finally a quintet over the past 12 years.  They all live on Long Beach Peninsula and each has her foot in various other musical groups as well as other pursuits.

Their instrumentation is an unusual one, but Hannelore Morgan, the group archivist, has managed to find some wonderful arrangements of pieces that span many musical periods. “

mozart

 

chicks

Tootlers make me think of my favourite blog, the Tootlepedal blog.

Tootlers make me think of my favourite blog, the Tootlepedal blog.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view east from the musicians' tent

view east from the musicians’ tent

seating area at the east end of the lawn

seating area at the east end of the lawn

Allan's photo, looking back toward house and music tent

Allan’s photo, looking back toward house and music tent

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a fort at the east end seating area

a fort at the east end seating area (Allan’s photo)

I saw local writer Sydney Stevens and her husband strolling toward the musician’s tent across the lawn.

sydney

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo from one of the island beds

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view

looking east-ish

island beds in a vast lawn

island beds in a vast lawn

looking south below the house

looking south below the house

The natural pond lies to the east of the house.

The natural pond lies to the east of the house.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

That's Allan taking a photo.

That’s Allan taking a photo.

goelz

with a viewing dock on its west side.

with a viewing dock on its west side.

dock6

dock5

dock2

The pond is a natural one and its water level falls over the course of the summer.

bridge

The little island is what makes this pond the best I’ve seen on the peninsula.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

sland5

island

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

island2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

island3

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The pond is encircled by a walking path.

The pond is encircled by a walking path…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

..and the pond has landscaping and seating all around.

..and the pond has landscaping and seating all around.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

chair

looking toward the bridge from the back of the pond

looking toward the bridge from the back of the pond

pond4

 

ond6

 

Allan's photo: When we returned to this garden in the afternoon, we were pleased to encounter Prissy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

Allan’s photo: We were pleased to encounter Prissy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart. (Prissy and me, in the distance, discussing plants.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo during his stroll all the way around the pond.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

P7190157

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: garden detailing all the way around

Allan’s photo: garden detailing all the way around

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, coming around the south side of the pond

Allan's photo of bird sculptures made of river rocks

Allan’s photo of bird sculptures made of river rocks

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo.  (He walked the pond path while I was busy chatting with Prissy.)

Allan’s photo. (He had walked the pond path while I was busy chatting with Prissy.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

On the south side of the garden between the house and the pond, the owners had created a garden area especially for their daughter’s wedding.

with a fire circle

with a fire circle

fire2

tree

 

and water features in the area where the wedding was held.

and water features in the area where the wedding was held.

a waterfall

a waterfall

with stream

with recirculating stream

leading to a fountain

leading to a fountain

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Note that there absolutely no liner showing under the rocks; I admired that very much when Nancy and I pre-toured the garden.

tree2

Around the south side of the house, with some shade from tall trees, a bank of hostas.

Around the south side of the house, with some shade from tall trees, a bank of hostas.

the back steps

the back steps

and here we go out the gate..

And here we go out the gate and on to the next garden.

 

 

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