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Posts Tagged ‘winter garden’

We begin with two guest photos by Steve McCormick of the Bayside Garden, probably taken on February 4.

Stunning!

Tuesday, 5 February 2019

I stayed in all day watching Gardeners’ World on youtube, a treasure trove of old episodes from 1991, when Geoff Hamilton was the amiable host. Allan took a walkabout when he got the mail.

A small snowperson at Thandi’s house:

Remnants of a snow angel:

A new garden on Spruce Street! Deer stroll throughout our town so the boxes are probably to keep them out.

His walkabout continued in our garden:

Ice gauges

He had company.

….And an audience.

I wondered if the snow would melt enough for us to install our pond. The liner was scheduled to arrive on Thursday. With more cold weather predicted, we might have a frustrating wait. Meanwhile, I was perfectly happy immersing myself in British gardens.

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Monday, 18 December 2017

At the Ilwaco Post Office, Allan delivered our card:

inside, Allan’s sketch

He saw a cute dog waiting outside:

The postal staff told him that this is the busiest day of the year.  In our small town, we have to get our mail at the post office (no home delivery).  I remember in Seattle that the busy holidays would have lines out the door.

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We all have to go there for our mail. They should get more than two cards!

When the rain stopped in the early afternoon, I went outside with the intention of raking some of last year’s debris out of the garden and chopping it into the compost bins.

We’d had this much rain.

After deposting a wheelbarrow load of debris into a compost bin, I was inspired to dig up an ornamental grass that was now languishing in the west bed too close to Leycesteria ‘Jealousy’.

I gave that up for a moment and decided to move a pink and white old rose that had become lost and invisible in the middle of the bed.

This particular old rose, maybe Rosa ‘Mundi’ used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery, a former job of ours (that is now handled by Todd, brother of artist Eric Wiegardt).  I removed the rose from the gallery for two reasons.  First, the deer discovered that garden so every year the rose got eaten to a nub.  Second, I planted it when the building was pink, and the rose color did not go with the latest gallery color, a pale sort of pea green.

Back when the gallery was pink and blue:

In 2007 or so, the gallery became a sort of faint purplish colour (not lavender) that still worked with the pink theme.

In 2009, it became a pale green and most of the pink theme did not look right anymore.

So the sad deer-chomped rose came home to live with me.

Now it has been moved to a spot where some gold Helenium and gold foliage shrubs are no doubt going to clash with the pink and white flowers.  I can pick the roses for bouquets if the combination is too painful.  This placement will enable me to watch the rose for rampant blackspot and to decide if it is worth keeping.

new home for a rose (where the soil is most ruched up)

Allan walked out the back door just when I was heading into the garage for the heavy pick to get out the big grass.  Lucky me, unlucky Allan.  He agreed to help me by hoiking out the grass and digging out two clumps of boring orange daylily and one big clump of grass infested shasta daisies.

An extra tall Boltonia asteroides went into the middle of the bed. The grass went toward the north edge of the garden, in the hole the boltonia came out of,  to balance another white and green variegated grass. A bit of shasta daisy went where the daylily came out, and Allan helped me do a better job of standing up the columnar apple I had transplanted into the west garden bed not long ago.

before

after

It was a tremendously satisfying work session and solved several problems that had been bothering me all summer.

After dark, which comes at 4:30 now, I read the shortest book of my reading year:

At 31 pages, this darling book is to be a gift for Dave and Melissa (who I am sure don’t read this blog, so don’t spill the beans).  They have a nice flock of chickens.  I read Lovgreen’s book in the 1970s and have always remembered its charm.

I have requested her memoir, As Far As I Can Remember, via interlibrary loan.

In 1982, I visited a friend who was renting a small house on Bainbridge Island.  Imagine my amazement and thrill when it turned out to be Minnie’s old house.  How I wish I had taken pictures of the house and landscape… Those were the days when film was precious and blogging was a thing of the far future.

All I have to show of that day is this photo of me and my significant other, Bryan, sitting in Minnie’s house.

1982

Today, in the evening, Allan wrapped all the presents.  He does a good, neat job.  My wrapped presents come out like bundles.  Some friends found this endearing, or so they said; this year, only Montana Mary got the bundled style of wrapping.

I can now show you how perfectly the little truck I got at NIVA green goes with a Christmas card from The Card Lady.

Tomorrow, much excitement awaits because we will go to see the new Star Wars movie with Dave and Melissa.

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Monday, 6 March 2017

I woke to sunshine and thought we could work…until I took a look out the window.

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view out the south cat door

Never mind.

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Skooter, staying in.  (Allan’s photo)

Allan took some snowy garden photos:

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I see a black spotty hellebore leaf that should be removed.

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hypericum

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When he went to the post office and dropped off three books at the library, he took more photos of the community building garden’s crocuses.

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Meanwhile, I was reading.

IMG_0352.JPGIt was difficult to leave the book for an early evening meeting of the Living Liberally Pacific County group.  I had only heard of Swallows and Amazons in the past year and was recently reminded of it by a mention on the Tootlepedal blog. 

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At Adrift Hotel in Long Beach


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Folks barbecuing nearby in icy wind.


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determined to wrest all enjoyment from their vacation


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into the meeting room we go

After another productive political meeting, Allan and I repaired upstairs to the [pickled fish] restaurant.

I’d been wanting to try absinthe for some time, because I’m a fan of artemisias in the garden.  It is made from Artemisia absinthium, which you can read about here. [pickled fish] serves it “in the traditional way”, involved a decanter, a spigot, and the melting of a sugar cube.

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absinthe: licorice, sweet, strong


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delicious fennel sausage pizza

Upon departure, I was especially struck by the beauty of the planters in the foyer.  Perhaps the absinthe enhanced my appreciation.

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some artemisia (but not absinthium)

Swallows and Amazons

During the day and into the night I read Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome.  How did I miss this 1930 classic as a child, especially since I had then sought out British children’s book authors (like Edith Nesbit and C.S. Lewis)?  As I read today, I occasionally felt verklempt about being old.

A few favourite bits from this delightful adventure of children camping on an island in the Lake District:

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…….

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……..

Oh, to have a mother as open to her children having adventures:

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…………….

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I have learned that the book is the first of a series.  I will be reading more of them.

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public service announcement

Maggie Stuckey, author of one of my favourite kitchen gardening books, The Bountiful Container, is going to be speaking at all four Timberland libraries on the subject of vegetable gardening in containers.  While I would most like to attend the talk at our local Ilwaco branch, it conflicts with an ACLU training session, so we will go to the Ocean Park one.  Allan took this photo at the library today.

 

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Thursday at Ocean Park, Saturday at Ilwaco

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Wednesday, 6 February 2016

The weather did continue in a rainy mode and a reading day was welcome.

This glorious book consumed my next two and a half days:

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Because I stopped every few pages and googled images of and more information about many of the places Bryson described, it was a deliciously slow read.  As I read, I was of course CONSUMED by the agony that I did not move to the UK when I had the chance (when I was married to a Leedsman.) I thought I could not because of being an only child, but in later years I could have brought my mum there as a dependent. (So Google told me on one of my side trips from the book.) O to be in England! I had the same reaction years ago whilst reading Bryson’s Notes From A Small Island.

“Nothing is more….

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This book also gave me similar angst and longing when I read it years ago (and then followed it with everything else this author had written):

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Smokey continued to recuperate in the convalescent room during the day, with his mother, Mary, to keep him company.

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Thursday, 4 February 2016

The Road to Little Dribbling consumed my day except for a walk out into the wet garden to pick a bouquet for the evening.

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west side, back garden

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center bed with white crocuses

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Lonicera fragrantissima (winter blooming honeysuckle)

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rain puddle by the bogsy woods

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Hellebore Losttagii

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I had to wade in deep to get some Cornus ‘Midwinter Fire’ twigs

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a bouquet for our evening outing

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double hellebores

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some silver painted twigs for the center

The evening occasion was a belated birthday dinner for Todd.  I found an old card of mine with a photo of Oysterville in springtime.  The twig frame came from Microsoft Photodraw, a simple program with the best frames I’ve ever found anywhere.  I’d love to find an app that has frames like this.  It also had a seashell frame and others that I loved.

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Salt Pub

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Allan’s photo

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Allan and I arrived early for the set up of a long table with our bouquet.

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Allan’s photo

We gathered at the Salt Hotel Pub.  Todd, who expected the usual garden gang of me, Allan, Dave, and Melissa,  was pleasantly surprised when Teresa from the Planter Box and Steve and John of the Bayside Garden arrived.

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martini and lemon drop

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Todd shares flower photos from a recent trip to Hawaii (Allan’s photo)

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I had the 3 cheese mac with kale caesar salad…perfection!

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oyster deviled eggs with microgreens from Pink Poppy Farm

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new on the menu: clam chowder

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John, Steve, Todd, Allan, Dave, Melissa, restaurateur Julez, Teresa

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photo by Julez Orr

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birthday present time with a man who knows how to enjoy a festive occasion

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Steve and John look at one of the presents, The Art of Gardening (about Chanticleer) (Allan’s photo)

Teresa had kindly bought her grandma’s recipe spice cake and I had ordered a round of chocolate cupcakes from Pink Poppy Bakery.

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Julez brings the birthday cupcakes

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Todd will get his wishes

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Allan’s photo

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The evening was a delight for all….until Melissa saved her cupcake for later at home, where her dog, Coulee, ate it, paper and all, as I was informed in a sorrowful text!

Friday, 5 February 2016

Another rainy day saw a trip to Oceanside Animal Clinic for Frosty’s check up.

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Allan’s photo: “Little Eddie”

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Little Eddie, a member of the Oceanside Animal Clinic staff, checked up on Smokey (who is in the carrier).

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Allan’s photo

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a sign in the exam room reminded my of Coulee’s cupcake theft

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Poor Smokey did not want to leave the carrier.  He made himself so very long. (Allan’s photo)

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naptime in the vet’s office

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Allan’s photo. Office work here requires some careful stepping.

Poor Smokey had to have his abscess lanced again, and again was praised for his good behavior.  Five more days of convalescing must follow, with ointment twice a day, and then perhaps he can get back to patrolling the garden.

I finished The Road to Little Dribbling, and a book of short stories of Lorrie Moore, and another book that was not good enough to even mention.  An intense windstorm in the afternoon made reading especially pleasant.  I took a video of the garden in the storm, which I posted on our Facebook page here.  I noticed while panning across the patio that one of my old wooden plant tables is on the verge of collapse.

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table is a goner

That is a project for another day.

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Calvin helped me read today.

Update: On Saturday, Todd and Melissa and Dave had a gardening job together, and Todd brought her one of the leftover cupcakes to make up for the one Coulee ate.  I was ever so glad to hear that because Pink Poppy makes a scrumptious cupcake.

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1 January, 2015

We had been looking forward since early December to a New Year’s Day brunch at the bayside home of Steve and John.  Their social events never give me any advance anxiety, probably because the ones we attend are all about gardening.  I will say that I feel that I have to exercise my brain really hard to keep up, especially when Seaside gardener Pam Fleming is another of the knowledgeable guests.  It’s good for the old brain cells to work hard.

The sun was bright, almost too bright for photos.

bay

bay

fluffy Pinus palustris with the bright stems of Acer palmatum 'Bihou'.

fluffy Pinus palustris with the bright stems of Acer palmatum ‘Bihou’.

As I wrote this, I got all excited at the fluffy, appealing pine  called palustris, which usually means a plant will grow in wet soil. Then I looked it up on Wikipedia and learned that “the scientific name meaning, “of marshes,” is a misunderstanding on the part of Philip Miller, who described the species after seeing longleaf pine forests with temporary winter flooding.”  So I won’t try it in the boggy back garden.

I should have asked for an exactly ID on this.  Will add later!

I should have asked for an exactly ID on this. Will add later!

above: Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm, windmill palm or Chinese windmill palm)

dramatic winter shapes

dramatic winter shapes

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

one ridiculously early rhodo flower

one ridiculously early rhodo flower

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I simply had to Waterlogue it.

I simply had to Waterlogue it.

They say you can really see the structure of one’s garden in black and white, so let’s have a look at it altered with the BeFunky app (which has some enjoyable effects even though I think the name of the app is silly).

looking good indeed for winter structure

looking good indeed for winter structure

west side of the house

west side of the house

To the north, I saw a bald eagle sitting with his back to me.

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I turned from my Lumix pocketcam to “Spot”, the lens-scratched Canon camera with a more powerful telephoto.

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Coral bark maple near the front door

Coral bark maple near the front door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a pink camellia, taller than the house and in full very early bloom

a pink camellia, taller than the house and in full very early bloom

 

In we went.  I had hoped to bring a few hellebore seedlings, but at midmorning they were still solidly in the ground, so I could only bring a small bouquet of intensely fragrant Lonicera standishii, whose tiny white blossoms do normally bloom now.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Lonicera and some corkscrew rush in glass jar

Steve putting the finishing touches on brunch

Steve putting the finishing touches on brunch

I sat at the end of the counter and noticed, as I always do there, how perfectly the front door frames the coral bark maple.

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When Pam arrived, the devices all came out and assorted plants were looked up.

 

Lonicera standishii was one of the plants explored online.

Lonicera standishii was one of the plants explored online.  (left to right, Allan, John, Steve, Pam)

 

Behind orange mimosas, Steve looks up a plant on his phone.

Behind orange mimosas, Steve looks up a plant on his phone.

back to chefing

back to chefing

his signature appetizer with carmelized onions and gorgonzola chees

his signature appetizer with carmelized onions and gorgonzola cheese

A gardening book was produced...

A gardening book was produced…

recently inscribed by Ann Lovejoy, whom we all adore.

recently inscribed by Ann Lovejoy, whom we all adore; this had been a gift from a Bainbridge Island friend.

I took a look out the north window to see how the pump house’s green roof is doing.  The weather has been hard on the California succulents.  Pleasingly, some survive.

greenish roof from north window

greenish roof from north window

a detail from the room

a detail from the room

a new sculpture which may go outside in fine weather.

a new sculpture which may go outside in fine weather.

Here are two crow paintings, probably both by local artist Pat Fagerland.

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This one is most definitely a Fagerland.

looking down to the fireplace seating

looking down to the fireplace seating

which I felt would look good in Waterlogue!

which I felt would look good in Waterlogue.

The table was set on the lower level and we settled in to the repast and more plant talk.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Rather cosmically, just last night I had been reading about black eyed peas and New Year’s Day.

from The Warmth of Other Suns...

from The Warmth of Other Suns…

black eyed peas for New Year's Day

black eyed peas for New Year’s Day

The thought had crossed my mind that I should eat some black eyed peas today for luck, yet I had none and no idea where to get any.  And here, in our delicious brunch, the traditional black eyed peas played a part!

with quiche and spicy sausage...

with quiche and spicy sausage…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, with Pam’s addition of black eyed peas salad front and center; it is her good luck tradition, too!  I also think there were black eyed peas next to the quiche, so we’ll double our good luck.

and a bowl of fruit, including crisp Asian pears.

and a bowl of fruit, including crisp Asian pears.

the view toward Willapa Bay

the view toward Willapa Bay

The tide was going out.  During the recent high tides, the water came all the way up to that tree.

I looked at the lichen dangling from the tall tree and thought that the “snow” on the indoor Christmas tree sort of echoed that ornamentation.

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The tide was going out.

Willapa Bay

In summer, Steve and John can see flickering campfires over on Long Island.

We repaired to the study to look at a Powerpoint presentation created to showcase the upcoming inaugural Peninsula Rhododendron Tour.  While we gathered, Allan took some photos from the window:

birdfeeder, Allan's photo

bird feeder, Allan’s photo

window view

window view, Allan’s photo

window view

window view, Allan’s photo

The presentation, created with wit and style, would attract any rhododendron fan to the peninsula.  Steve and John had recently presented it to the American Rhododendron Society’s Portland chapter and may show it to a chapter up in Seattle.  You will want to mark your calendars for May 2.

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This tour will be in addition to the July 18, 2015 Music in the Gardens tour.

The presentation explored the timeline of the American Rhododendron Society itself…

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rhodos

The local connection was explored via the history of J. Harold Clarke, who was the grandfather of Steve Clarke, known to us in our day as the plantsman extraordinaire of Clarke Nursery.  Steve and John’s property and that of their neighbour, Ron Barclay, were part of the original Clarke Nursery.

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Note the mention of a rhodo names after our Steve Clarke.

 

The story was set off beautifully by the eastern view from the study windows.

The story was set off beautifully by the eastern view from the study windows.

Both properties are rich in species and hybrid rhododendrons and will be the centerpiece of the tour, along with a breakfast lecture by Steve Clarke.

A series of photos told the story of the transformation of Steve and John’s property from a woodland full of ivy and salal to a collectors’ garden, revealing treasures of old rhododendrons and other plants along the way.

I recall visiting last spring and being bowled over, almost literally, by the fragrance of a particular rhododendron.  I now know this it is not ‘King George’; it is ‘Venus’.

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not 'King George': 'Venus'

not ‘King George’: ‘Venus’, taken last April 22.

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After the well done and informative show, we found that daylight was almost gone.

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the tide is further out

The inside wall of the upper level mimics the shape of the windows in a most satisfying way.

The inside wall of the upper level mimics the shape of the windows in a most satisfying way.

the glow of the house as we depart

the glow of the house as we depart

and an almost full moon over the roof

and an almost full moon over the roof

When we arrived back in Ilwaco after dark, we saw the peace sign alight over the home of Don Andersen and finally managed to get a photo of it for this year.  It’s one of our favourite seasonal displays, along with the Christmas star over Jessie’s Fish Company, which we noted has been turned off for the year.  Allan walked up Elizabeth Avenue to get the pictures.

Elizabeth Avenue, looking north from Lake Street

Elizabeth Avenue, looking north from Lake Street

the Andersen peace sign

the Andersen peace sign

The peace sign, black eyed peas, and brunch with three of our favourite gardeners are surely all good portents for 2015.

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It certainly is a difficult time of year to find time to just read!  There is so much to do in our beachy towns over the holidays.

Thursday, 18 December 2014

I seemed to find all sorts of little chores to do (and presents to wrap) over the afternoon of Thursday.  I even took a short walk as I have not been getting any gardening exercise due to rainy and windy weather.

When I turned the corner on Pearl Avenue, half a block away, the wind from the south was so strong that my walk became a brief one.

at the meander line, looking west

at the meander line, looking west

and east toward our bogsy woods

and east toward our bogsy woods

The same photo, with painted photo effect by Waterlogue.

The same photo, with painted photo effect by Waterlogue.

I hope this winter to do a post on my other blog about the meander line, the irregular imaginary line that runs east-west between the town and the port.

I made it as far as Don Nisbett’s Art Gallery on Waterfront Way (because I knew there would be cookies).

Don was talking enthusiastically to some high school students who wanted internships.

Don was talking enthusiastically to some high school students who wanted internships.

marina view from the gallery windows

marina view from the gallery windows

I returned home to snoozing cats, who continued to lack a lap to sit on as Allan and I were off out to a watercolor art show just round the block at Grays Harbor Community College’s local annex.

Miss Mary, snoozing

Miss Mary, snoozing

Calvin

Calvin

We found the block long trip, at dusk, to be so wet and wild that we got thoroughly drenched.

Looking west on Lake Street...

Looking west on Lake Street…with Allan just leaving our gate.

Allan's photo, looking east

Allan’s photo, looking east

The watercolours by instructor and students were displayed in the hallway of the college.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

mingling, with art instructor Carol Couch on left

Allan’s photo:  mingling, with art instructor Carol Couch on left

We were pleased that our friend from Seaview, Patti, was at the event, as well.  You might recall that Carol Couch’s studio was one of the venues on the recent studio tour, where we had bought a couple of her prints.  I am hoping to take a class from her, perhaps this winter.  She assured me that she takes rank beginners. Even though I have been enjoying creating, well, fake watercolours from photos with the Waterlogue app, I still would like to learn to create the real thing.

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Patti wisely had her high water pants on.

Some cookies, crackers and cheese had been laid out in the student lounge.

Some cookies, crackers and cheese had been laid out in the student lounge of the small college building.

The outdoor seating area, shieded from wind, shows how damp the weather was at dusk.

The outdoor seating area, shieded from wind, shows how damp the weather was at dusk…looking southwest across the port parking lots.

Since it was Thursday, we went out again later to the Cove Restaurant’s fish taco night (where Allan actually got a tasty $2 fish taco to go with the rest of his meal; I’ve been sidetracked every time  by the ahi tuna dish).  The roads were like lakes, with sheets of rain water driven sideways by the wind.

Allan's photo: looking in the front window of the Cove.

Allan’s photo: looking in the front window of the Cove.

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The restaurant had a musician playing and was so busy that we sat at the counter, an excellent spot for watching the kitchen and getting to have quick chats with Wendy and Sondra when they get a moment to rest.

at the counter

at the counter, with restaurateur Sondra and her sister Wendy at work

view from our counter seats into the busy dining room

view from our counter seats into the busy dining room

George Coleman skillfully entertained with seasonal tunes.

George Coleman skillfully entertained with seasonal tunes.

I’d been craving Chef Jason Lancaster’s food as we had not been in for three weeks.  (Last Thursday’s storm had closed the restaurant down, and the previous Thursday it had been full to overflowing.)

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We shared Prawns Solo and Allan had a fish taco and the udon noodle bowl.

We shared Prawns Solo and Allan had a fish taco and the udon noodle bowl.

Chef Jason says that the sauce in a noodle bowl is better absorbed and enhanced by udon noodles than by yakisoba noodles.

I was thrilled that his delectably prepared ahi tuna was on tonight's menu.

I was thrilled that his delectably prepared ahi tuna was on tonight’s menu.

schmoozing with Jason about food (Allan's photo)

schmoozing with Jason about food (Allan’s photo)

the dining room, still aglow as we were among the last diners to depart.

the dining room, still aglow as we were among the last diners to depart.

After the evening of Thursday, January 1st, the restaurant will be closed for the rest of January.  We hear they will be open for feasting on New Year’s Eve (but won’t be staying open till midnight!)

Friday, 19 December 2014

Friday was a much needed reading day…

I read this and China Bayles mystery.

I read this and China Bayles mystery.

One Perfect Day was written in the droll style of the New Yorker, and made me glad that the wedding I attended last summer was a true home made garden wedding, untouched by the wedding industry.

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excerpt

Saturday, 20 December 2014

After a Friday of just reading (pure delight), we devoted Saturday to holiday errands.

We had had a pineapple express of rain overnight, as the view of our back garden shows.

We had had a pineapple express of rain overnight, as the view of our back garden shows.

When we went down to the Saturday Market, we heard that the water had been up over the Jessie’s Fish Co loading docks.

We came just after high tide.

We came just after high tide.

It would have looked like this photo from a 2011 edition of the Chinook Observer:

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Inside the Saturday Christmas Market, our mission was to buy a few gifts and to stock up on some frosted cookies from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Pink Poppy owner Madeline Moore

Pink Poppy owner Madeline Moore

lemony frosted cookies

lemony frosted cookies

Local potter Karen Brownlee had a booth today.

Local potter Karen Brownlee had a booth today.

shopping at Lisa Gillespie's booth

shopping at Lisa Gillespie’s booth (Allan’s photo)

double storm flag (Allan's photo)

double storm flag (Allan’s photo)

a delivery to and a present from Don Nisbett (Allan's photo)

a delivery to and a present from Don Nisbett (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo by Don's gallery

Allan’s photo by Don’s gallery

On the way north on a present-delivery run, we popped into NIVA green for reasons we cannot specify here (as our reason had to do with Christmas shopping).

inside NIVA green

inside NIVA green

Heather asked me if I would help out with the NIVA green Facebook page.  She actually asked “How much do you charge?” which is a novel question indeed and one that I much appreciated!  I told her that I had just read that book about the wedding industry in which one wedding planner would not name a price but would wait till the immediate afterglow of a perfectly beautiful wedding and then ask the mother of the bride “How much was it worth to you?”  Anyway, I look forward to being able to add some photo content to the page, as Heather herself is busy creating and acquiring objects of art.

Heather Ramsay sets the world on fire.

Heather Ramsay sets the world on fire.

Heather Ramsay table lamps

Heather Ramsay table lamps and faux heater (Oh how I love them, especially the “heater”)

all sorts of charming little gifties

all sorts of charming little gifties

We left NIVA green to deliver presents to the hydrangea house, Andersen’s RV Park, and Klipsan Beach Cottages.

a mossy wall at the hydrangea house.

a mossy wall at the hydrangea house

the footprints of homeowner Lisa and Buzz's dog, Maddie (Allan's photo)

the footprints of homeowner Lisa and Buzz’s dog, Maddie (Allan’s photo)

I am pretty sure that the owner of Andersen’s doesn’t read this blog; if she does, she is going to see just one day early what her Christmas present is: a delightful history book about trailer life.

bungalows

Onward we drove to Klipsan Beach Cottages, where the garden was well decorated for the season by owners Mary and Denny.

the view west from Mary and Denny's house showing the road to the cottages on the ridge.

the view west from Mary and Denny’s house showing the road to the cottages on the ridge.

KBC

KBC

view in the east gate of the fenced garden

view in the east gate of the fenced garden

photo enhancement by Waterlogue

photo enhancement by Waterlogue

in the garden

in the garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

by the office door

by the office door

inside the office

inside the office

Mary and Denny's tree

Mary and Denny’s tree

flowers

 

Allan's photo: Bella, me, Mary

Allan’s photo: Bella, me, Mary

some pets for Bella

some pets for Bella

We did not linger long as three of Mary’s sisters were there and bustling preparations were underway for more family to arrive.

As we arrived back in Ilwaco, we saw that a large Santa had arrived two blocks west.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

In the evening, our friend J9 joined us at the Sou’wester for a musical play performed by Nick Jaina.  We had been quite taken with him when we saw him on another stormy weekend over a year ago.

Sou'wester Lodge, Allan's photo

Sou’wester Lodge, Allan’s photo

I always love the glow of the vintage trailer court at night.

I always love the glow of the vintage trailer court at night.

souwester

Sou'wester sunporch, Allan's photo

Sou’wester sunporch, Allan’s photo

tonight's event

tonight’s event

Innkeepers and guests were just finishing their dinner in the lodge kitchen.  (Allan's photo)

Innkeepers and guests were just finishing their dinner in the lodge kitchen. (Allan’s photo)

We were offered clam chowder; Allan accepted and said it was delicious.

Allan noticed the "how it works" sign on the living room turntable.

Allan noticed the “how it works” sign on the living room turntable.

With J9, we sat on a couch and waited for a few minutes..

With J9, we sat on a couch and waited for a few minutes.

photo courtesy Sou'wester

photo courtesy Sou’wester

From the Sou’wester event description:  With Nick Jaina “recently back from New Orleans, we have a rare opportunity to witness this thought-provoking performance from one of our favorite artists-in-residence and performers. Please be in your seats by 8 pm.

The Hole in the Coffin is a 50-minute story told through words and music by Nick Jaina about a strange experience he had in New Orleans of going to the funeral of his hero and ending up inside the coffin with a gun and a bible. He tries to unravel the information he is given, reconnect with his former love, and piece together the perfect love song.”

Nick Jaina sang and spoke of mysterious happenings on a visit to New Orleans.

Nick Jaina sang and spoke of mysterious happenings on a visit to New Orleans.

While I am not big on New Year’s resolutions, after this riveting performance I resolved to further my efforts to get out to more Sou’wester events in the future, even though it is so hard to leave the house in the evening once one gets settled in.

The performance inspired a thoughtful mood that distracted me from purchasing a copy of Nick’s book.  I must find out if the Sou’wester has it for sale or else order it online.

jaina

Since I was so impressed last year with a song he wrote about lost love, I am particularly interested in his survey on “the ability of love songs to woo anyone, featuring interviews with people [he’s] written love songs about.”

At home, we added some one more photo to our collection of Ilwaco’s homes for the holidays.

our house (Allan's photo)

our house (Allan’s photo)

We would now have four days to relax before the next round of holiday events.

 

 

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Sunday, 8 December 2013: at home

still a cold view to the south

still a cold view to the south

looking down from the south window

looking down from the south window

Allan had to thaw out the hummingbird feeder.

Allan had to thaw out the hummingbird feeder.

I did not set one toe outside. Instead, I spent the day rearranging my room so that I have a sideways window view from my computer desk, and setting up a new reading nook (probably a cat nook) in my room.

with picture from my friend Mary F and a Joey Ramone doll made by my friend Montana Mary.

with picture from my friend Mary F and a Joey Ramone doll made by my friend Montana Mary.

The reading nook was accomplished by removing a large quantity of gardening books from a big pressed board bookshelf that sat, unattractively, in that corner. The day before, I had acquired a new bookshelf at the North Coast Antique Mall in Seaview and used it to reorganize my garden books. One more low double shelf under the window would get them all into the same area of the house. (And two big bags full went to Olde Towne Trading Post.)

On staycation , I get a lot more done on Sundays and Mondays when Olde Towne Café is closed!

still seeking perfect sized shelf for under the window

still seeking perfect sized shelf for under the window

Monday, 9 December 2013

The snow melted so I took a walk through the front and close-in back garden.

Dichroa febrifuga

Dichroa febrifuga

Rubus lineatus

Rubus lineatus

Melianthus major

Melianthus major

front garden Hebe might perk up.

front garden Hebe might perk up.

I think Allan's Hebe will be fine.

I think Allan’s Hebe will be fine.

back garden: cat paws on the frozen water box

back garden: cat trackss on the frozen water box

Looks hopeful in the greenhouse

Looks hopeful in the greenhouse

Frosty in his BirdsBeSafe collar

Frosty in his BirdsBeSafe collar

The kale is definitely sweeter, just as it is supposed to be after frost.

The kale is definitely sweeter, just as it is supposed to be after frost.

more hebes looking pretty lively

more hebes looking pretty lively

temperature still mighty cold

temperature still mighty cold

Allan's birdbath

Allan’s birdbath

After our brief walkabout, Frosty seemed happy to be back indoors.

his favourite perch in the living room

his favourite perch in the living room

I love the new orientation of my desk so that I can see out the window, sideways. I had resisted moving the rolltop desk because the corner of it blocks a small bit of window. It was worth it. The view is sort of like this:

view actually standing at the open window

view actually standing at the open window

My eyes see it more like this, zooming in on Jessie's star.

My eyes see it more like this, zooming in on Jessie’s star.

In reality, it is like this (slightly after dusk) with one window blown with moisture.

In reality, it is like this (slightly after dusk) with one window blown with moisture.

At the end of the day, I attended a memorial tree lighting at our local hospital, an event which deserves its own entry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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