Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘World Kite Museum garden’

Sunday, 11 November 2018

Good weather and fall clean up continued.  The days have been like the best of summer, sunny but not too warm.

Long Beach

My goal was to complete a few fall clean up areas and erase them from the work board.

We began with clipping catmint and pulling crocosmia and planting the Basket Case donation of sea thrift in the Sid Snyder Drive planters.

before

after

The ocean was bright blue and calm today.

the westernmost planter

gazania still blooming

The World Kite Museum garden, on the south side of Sid Snyder, got its fall clean up.

The museum dwarfs our pots and pocket garden.

before

after

The garden needs a lavender to match the one on the right side.

I like to leave a lot of seed heads standing, for birds, so did not cut back the oregano or lavender here.

We checked up on the Bolstad beach approach planters.  I did not mention last week that we planted some sea thrift out there.  I did not want to tempt the fate that has for the last several years made plants disappear by the day after I planted them.  It was worth testing it out with free plants from the Basket Case—and the plants are still there.  I am hoping that the thief has moved away.  Or reformed.  I am not hoping the person died, although I suppose that is a possibility.  I am also hoping said person does not read this blog.

Something strange happened.  I stood at the west end of the beach approach after pulling just a few weeds there and suddenly, I fervently wished it was February or March and that we were about to embark upon the ten to thirteen day annual first weeding of the beach approach garden.  I shocked myself with a feeling of joy at the prospect.  Peculiar.

looking east down many blocks of weeding

Apparently I still like this job.  That made me wonder how I am going to make the decision to retire from Long Beach!

We turned our attention to the fall clean up at City Hall (and the big popout nearby, where I clipped back some straying rugosa roses).

City Hall garden, north side

some late Welsh poppies

We next went to Coulter Park, where Allan pulled a vast number of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in a bed that became inaccessible after a ramp was built, unless you crawl through or climb over the railing.

before

after (Allan’s photo)

The ramp goes to the old train depot building which will house Shoeboxes of Joy between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Shoeboxes of Joy in the old train depot, 2013

We don’t have time to make a shoebox (for local seniors) so we just give a monetary donation by popping in with some cash on a day when the volunteers are working, after Thanksgiving day.

Cotoneaster berries in Coulter Park

While Allan yanked Crocosmia, I did the fall clean up on two blocks of planters.  The planters will need a go-round again after the first hard frost.

I found a rock.

The cosmos are coming out of all the planters now.

They have little left to offer.

a planter that still has much to offer

As I took photos, my Lumix—a refurbished one less than a year old—insisted several times that it be turned off and on again, and then came the dreaded message:

Looks like another Lumix bites the dust.  (The several new Lumixes I have bought have all done the same thing after a year or less.)  I am disappointed because I like its capabilities.

I switched to my phone camera.

Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’, before…

and after, again thwarted from being eight feet tall and wide.

Chrysanthemum and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

another chrysanth just now starting to bloom—how I love them!

I have read several blog articles on Garden Rant frothing over with chrysanthemum loathing.  Fie on that!  They are quite wonderful here, bloom for ages, and return reliably in the planters.  And I adore the scent of the foliage.

When I bought my grandmother’s house in 1980, I spent some time trying to find chrysanths that were like the ones she grew when I was a child, the tall ones, almost as tall as me.  Then I realized my memory was measuring them based on my height as a little girl.

The dusky pink one just north of NIVA green is slowly fading.

Across from Dennis Company, has been blooming for weeks.

I am not going to do any fiddly deadheading at this stage.  When the frost comes, or when we go to shop at Dennis hardware for some reason, I will take that whole plant down to the base at once.  Later.

My last individual task was to pull and clip the BadAster which has been moderately welcome to grow under a street tree.

The seeds blew down the block….

Allan and I reunited by pulling some cosmos at the front of Coulter Park.  A hebe had suddenly decided to hide the memorial.

fixed

After we dumped debris, we bought four bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost at Dennis Company.  The first three went to…

The Depot Restaurant

…where I had felt that mulch was needed after yesterday’s fall clean up.

before

after

The fourth bag went to…

The Shelburne Hotel

….to fluff up the area where we had dug out loads of Crocosmia corms to make a new fuchsia bed.  I am sure the soil had been thoroughly worn out by the vigor of crocosmia.

No wonder Allan is tired by end of the day.

That bale would be un-liftable had it been outside for awhile.  Dennis sells it from inside of a building, so it is dry.

very nice for the Hawkshead fuchsia I planted there yesterday…

While I did more tidying of the path and put river rock at the back of the fuchsia bed, Allan cleaned up a neglected area on the north side of the building.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

I noticed the canna is blooming in the full shade mini bog garden by the fine dining entrance:

The big dining room is open with its own menu on Friday and Saturday nights.

We did some more garden trimming until dusk….

Shelburne at sunset

the garden by lamplight )Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

…and then we were lured into the pub by the warm lights through the stained glass windows.

guests by the living room fireplace

I tried a Cranberry Shrub, delicious!

I told Brooke, the young bartender, that we were celebrating the end of Mulch Week.  She replied in her delightful manner, “I don’t know what that is, but yay!”…a reminder that not everyone knows our gardening terminology.

Caesar salad, delectable black garlic fried rice, fish and chips

my favourite dessert, the cream cheese blackberry tart

But oh, the dessert Allan had is new and so delicious, a rocky road semifreddo, like a frozen mousse.  It could almost divert me from the tart…This will be a difficult choice next time.

Allan’s photo

I reflected during dinner on how I feel that the Shelburne itself wants me to be its gardener, and how it missed me during the ten years when I left the garden (because of reasons).  I feel a connection with the place that I cannot explain.

At home, I was able to erase Coulter crocosmias, beach approaches, city hall, and kite museum from the work board.

I won’t say where, but today I saw the hidden stash of a homeless person hidden in a barberry patch…

I can only imagine the misery of making a camp in a grove of barberries because of the terrible thorns:

Tiny mean thorns all over the barberry grove.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Even though we had watered Long Beach and more on Monday, we watered there again because we won’t have time for the city gardens tomorrow before we leave for the Hardy Plant Study Weekend.

The Depot Restaurant

Even though ALL I wanted to do was water today so I could get home early (I hadn’t even packed yet!), I checked the whacked escallonia at the Depot garden immediately and saw that it was finally greening up.  I could not resist fixing its bad haircut look.

before

clamshell railroad driving tour sign

after

north side of dining deck

east side of restaurant

The Red Barn Arena

We skipped Diane’s garden and Klipsan Beach Cottages this week (because the garden owners will water) but thought we had better water the Red Barn plants.

no time to string trim the edge

Long Beach

I have been fretting over how the plants would do without a good watering between today and Tuesday the 26th.  Fortunately, cool weather and some drizzle is predicted.

Salvia ‘Black and Bloom’

Even after I had done a bit of trimming on the police station roses, I felt they needed cutting back today. Especially when I saw a family skirting by the part with wide roses and crocosmia.  The Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ just cannot be there.  This project would have to follow watering.

not the enough sidewalk

Someone left gifts.

I like the new paint job on the former Campiche Gallery building.

Here it was before:

Google street view

As you can see, the upper windows have been replaced and some of the gingerbread is gone.

In the planter across the street from that building, this ‘Popsocks’ cosmos…

made a good color match for this agastache:

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

another interesting ‘Popsocks’ cosmos

lavender, California poppies, Allium christophii

Even though most of the alliums have been broken or taken, there are still enough to elicit many questions from passersby.  One woman gave me an especially nice compliment, that she loves flowers and has been overjoyed walking around town.

We do get a lot of compliments.  Perhaps I should quote them more but it seems like boasting if I do.  I did get rather a backwards one today in a message from a friend whose gardening skills I admire: “I just so absolutely love your gardens at the port. They are so bright and lovely. I know you hadn’t planted the ones in the Long Beach planters but I wish those were as vibrant as your gardens in Ilwaco. They would have better uniformity.”  Hmmm.  It’s a compliment but not….not…quite.  I replied with thanks and added that a lot of the planters still have plants from volunteer days so some are rather shrubby.  I felt a bit flummoxed.

I do often think it would be good if someone else was coming along behind us to take over and do a fresh job on the planters, someone who would not be hesitant in what to plant, as I am, because of finger blight.

a bee on a heuchera (Allan’s photo)

Bees love our planters.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

one of the shrubby planters at its best (Allan’s photos)

Allan had to skip this planter and come back to it “when there were only four people sitting on it.”

We do have to ask people to move off the benches as we proceed through town with our hoses.

Allan’s photo

When I finished watering my half of the planters, I was pleased to see that Allan had finished his and was working on the rose pruning.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

While he cleaned up the sidewalk, I weeded the Veterans Field flag pavilion garden.

my version of a red white and blue garden: Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Salvia ‘May Night’ and a blue agastache

Finally, we watered the planters on the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach.

a dianthus in a planter that has been totally redone since volunteer days; some of the plaques are still attached.

echinops in a Sid Snyder planter (Allan’s photo)

the westernmost planter that needs to be bucket watered (Allan’s photo)

We were not quite done, because the World Kite Museum is on Sid Snyder and I realized we had not checked its little garden for at least two weeks if not much longer.

Fortunately, it looked fine.

I went home to pack and to water with six different sprinklers, one after another, while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters again.  We had been going to do that tomorrow before leaving, till we realized two things: It won’t make much difference if they get watered at eight o clock tonight or 11 AM tomorrow, and if we water tonight, we can recharge the water trailer battery so it is ready in case of emergency (like if we never return and someone else has to water!)

While watering the Ilwaco planters, Allan saw some excitement with our volunteer fire department.

Along with what looked like a training exercise, they hung a banner.

Thursday, 21 June 2018

Before leaving on our trip, we gave the Shelburne Hotel garden a good watering.

looking north

looking south

over the fence

It took a little longer than we had planned because Allan went upstairs to look at the pots on the various decks and balconies.  The plants up there are in sad shape.  We are waiting for new pots to appear and then we will address that problem.  Here are his upstairs views of the back garden:

in one of the suites

If all goes well, our next post should begin the story of our upcoming garden tour extravaganza.  We may publish the garden tour posts more than once a day to avoid having this blog fall a month behind real time.  I have mixed feelings about posting so often, but hey…I’m not forcing anyone to read it and I have an intense autistic need to post events in the correct order rather than saving tour posts for the wintertime.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Friday, 4 May 2018

Ilwaco Fire Station garden

Before work, we stopped by the Ilwaco Fire Station where councilwoman Missy “Lucy Dagger” had dug up most of the remaining L shaped area of weedy grass in our volunteer garden area.  We bucketed up the piled up sod and hauled it off to make it easier for her.

I had a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ to bung in there.

more to come!

The Depot Restaurant

The garden got a tiny bit of deadheading and some container watering.

Long Beach

We deadheaded the welcome sign, where the tulips are, unfortunately, almost over, and yet it is too early to pull them all and plant annuals.

Next on the list was The Big PopOut, a raised garden on Ocean Beach Boulevard

before


after (Allan’s photos)

I wish I had not planted rugosa roses in this bed.  More variety would be fun.  And I did not choose the so called dwarf pampas grass.

a white armeria finding room for itself in the wall


We missed the proper time to sheer the pampas all the way back. The roses will hide its skirts. (Allan’s photos)

We went on to touch up the garden at city hall, a block north.  It had held up well since our recent work there.

City Hall east side (Allan’s photo)


Geranium macrorrhizum (Allan’s photo) The leaves have the fragrance of pine.


new growth on hostas


Allan’s photos

Allan’s photo

This little park was planted by Gene and Peggy Miles.

We weeded the disheartening amount of scrimmy little horsetail in Fifth Street Park’s west side.  I was pleased that Allan found new growth on a Sambucus ‘Black Lace’ that someone had broken off to the ground over the winter.

SW corner, before Allan weeded it…


and after (Hesperantha is a running problem here)

A few sweet peas are up….wish them luck against snails.

reseeded Cerinthe major purpurascens


The blue flowers are camassia.

I feel that the soil in the bed above has gotten quite poor.  Soil Energy is not enough.  I think I must add some bagged manure.  I could get horse manure for free, but it introduces the dreaded pasture grass.

We groomed the planters out on the Boldstad beach approach…

Looking east from the west end of the approach garden.

Oh, my…the big stands of wild beach lupines in the garden are covered in grey aphids.

This is a problem that I am leaving completely to nature.

one lady bug on aphid duty


another stand of lupines coated with aphids, and a couple of lady bugs.

The mugo pines in the long, dry garden look pitiful.

We will do more mulching out here when another pile of mulch is provided.

would love to fill in low areas with Soil Energy mulch

rugosa rose, lupine, and Juniper conferta spilling out


Allan found a rock.

…and then we tidied planters on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

Tulip batalinii ‘Bright Gem’ (Allan’s photo)


on Sid Snyder Drive

For our almost last thing, we tidied the currently quite drab garden at the World Kite Museum.

Allan’s photo


The pots look good.


those wonderful Bright Gem tulips

We accomplished the pruning job that I had noticed yesterday.

before


after

The south parking lot berm got the tiniest of touch ups.

At home, because I was a blog post ahead, I was able to sit down and watch some Gardeners’ World episodes before dinner…and at bedtime.

Monty likes agastaches!

Here is a alpine garden idea from 2015 GW visit to Slack Top Nursery.  I would like to replicate it.  My ground level scree garden has too much horsetail to be good.  I would have to use synthetic stone, though (“cottage stone”, I suppose).

Ah….

Have I shared the link to this video tour of Craigieburn garden?  Enjoy for the first or second time.

 I am looking ahead to Annuals Planting Time starting in about a week.

However, we will now take at least three days off.  We are still slightly poorly from our cold, and my garden is a disaster.  We’ll attend the Saturday Children’s Parade in Ilwaco but not the big Sunday parade in Long Beach.  Tomorrow’s post: The Children’s Parade, shared from our Ilwaco blog.

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

As usual lately, workable weather gave me the big idea that I could cross four things off of the work list.

dsc00882

Iris reticulata at the Ilwaco post office (Allan’s photo)

After a brief post office weeding, we headed to Long Beach and began with the planters on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

Sid Snyder Drive

DSC06621.JPG

looking west on Sid Snyder

DSC06622.JPG

santolina and narcissi

DSC00883.jpg

clipping santolina (Allan’s photo)

 

DSC06623.JPG

I find it regrettable that this resort replaced drought tolerant lavenders and ornamental grasses with lawn.

DSC00888.jpg

planter, before (Allan’s photos)

DSC00889.jpg

and after

DSC06624.JPG

more narcissi.  I should have paused to break off those echinops stubs.

DSC00890.jpg

west end of Sid Snyder, south end of boardwalk, last planter

dsc06626

a short scenic break, from the boardwalk, because life is short.

DSC00893.jpg

interpretive signs on the boardwalk

DSC00894.jpg

dsc06629

whale sculptures

DSC00895.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC00896.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC00899.jpg

DSC00891.jpg

Discovery Trail (Allan’s photo)

Allan noticed two socks abandoned by a tourist excited to see the ocean.

DSC00904.jpg

World Kite Museum

Also on Sid Snyder is the Kite Museum. While we began a little touch up clipping on the small entry garden, museum store manager Patty emerged and I was able to ask what the plans were for a newly cleared entry area.

DSC06633.JPG

Kite Museum entry; our little garden is out of frame to the right.

The answer is that the museum will have a new bike rack and picnic table spot and some big flower pots.  Patty and I agreed that the row of tatty old hebes to the right should be pulled out, as the ones on the left side had been removed.  I like that idea even more if someone other than us does the digging.  Then our little garden will show better.

DSC06631.JPG

before, with shabby hebes to the left that will be gone

DSC06632.JPG

after

Allan did all the work while Patty and I discussed big ideas.  She knew we were coming soon because she watches the work board on this blog.

Bolstad beach approach

DSC06634.JPG

west end of Bolstad

I had brought some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts from home to fill in these planters; last year we had a startling amount of theft of good plants along this approach.

DSC06640.JPG

an interesting display showing local volcanos (Washington and Oregon)

DSC06635.JPG

DSC06636.JPG

DSC06637.JPG

DSC06638.JPG

I myself have found pumice stone on this beach, probably from the 1980 eruption of Mt. St Helens.

In the second planter to the east, I found the first finger blight of the year.

blight.png

two recently stolen armeria (sea thrift) plants

Our thief is at it again.  I wish I could catch her.  I could tell her that sea thrift does not transplant well.  I put Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ in its place.  She may like that, too.

Allan had gone to the beach approach garden to clip ornamental grasses.  He brought the van back to me so that we could sit out a heavy rain squall.

DSC06643.JPG

looking east

Fortunately, it was but a squall and we were able to get back to work without misery.

DSC06644.JPG

lots of standing water in the dunes

DSC06646.JPG

beach approach garden, looking east

Today we were only clipping.  The big weeding of the beach approach garden still awaits us.  I do not think it will be as tough a job as usual; the weeds are not a thick carpet this year.

DSC06647.JPG

not too bad!

DSC06649.JPG

some poppy seedlings; I scattered lots of seedpods last fall.

dsc06651

looking west, rugosa roses

One of the things we will be doing along with the weeding is pulling out as many rugosa roses from right along the edge as we can.  So if any of you locals want some, let me know and I’ll tell you when that is about to happen.

DSC06652.JPG

What have we here? Deer or thieving human? I think someone was trying to steal bulbs that are planted deep.

DSC06653.JPG

Not very weedy.  I wish there were more poppy seedlings.  Maybe later.

DSC06655.JPG

Looking east.  A volunteer wax myrtle is fighting it out with an escallonia.

DSC06656.JPG

definitely deer eaten tulips

Parks Manager Mike drove by and agreed to get us a pile of Soil Energy mulch.  I am thrilled we do not have to drive up peninsula to get it ourselves.  We will bucket it from a pile in the works yard.

DSC06657.JPG

rugosa rose stems sticking out too far into the sidewalk area

DSC06659.JPG

a temporary fix by clipping

While I weeded and clipped in the planters, Allan had clipped tall grasses all along this garden.  It’s a tedious task.

beforeafter

before and after

beforeafter.png

before and after

beforeafter.png

before and after

beforeafter.png

before and after

DSC00931.jpg

It’s especially unpleasant to pull old crocosmia leaves from inside prickly roses.

DSC00932.jpg

This leads to thorns in the fingers.

DSC00929.jpg

planter work

Parking Lot “Berms”

We tidied up several Stipa gigantea and a few perennials on the north and south parking lot gardens, east of downtown.

DSC00933.jpg

Allan’s photos: Stipa gigantea before

DSC00934.jpg

and after

DSC00935.jpg

the north berm

DSC06662.JPG

last Stipa, south berm, before trimming

DSC06665.JPG

end of south berm

DSC06664.JPG

While pulling crocosmia, I found an old bird next.

I had had a dream today of getting the rambling roses pruned in Fifth Street Park. Since the temperature was dropping, a wind kicking up, and not enough time left, we did one more small project that had never even made it to the work board.

Minnie Culbertson Park

DSC06666.JPG

before

DSC06668.JPG

after, with a vigorous trimming of the lithodora

DSC06669.JPG

The first clean up column is almost done!

While we might be able to polish off the Port of Ilwaco spring clean up in one day or two, the weather forecast is dire so I cannot count on it happening tomorrow.

Read Full Post »

Friday, 20 May 2016

I awoke after five hours of sleep, thought briefly about the lost Golden Sands garden, and went back to sleep for two more hours.  The cycle of sleepless stress is finally broken.

Before work, Allan helped me place my mother’s birdbath in the front garden.  It will make a fine view from my writing desk.

Allan's photo: Two round marks in the center are from yellow duckies that sat on it at Golden Sands...where it was only filled with water on the days we worked there, or by rain.

Allan’s photo: Two round marks in the center are from yellow duckies that sat in the birdbath at Golden Sands…where it was only filled with water on the days we worked there, or by rain.

I found decorative glass pieces to put on those spots.

I found decorative glass pieces to put on those spots.

Mom's birdbath under the Tetrapanax 'Steroidal Giant'

Mom’s birdbath under the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’, from the window

On the front gate, we found a treasure:

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Later, an email revealed it was from Patti of the Seaview garden.  She’d also given us some cool rusty stuff earlier in the week after Melissa’s birthday party.

rust from Patti (Allan's photo)

rust from Patti (Allan’s photo)

At the library, I had a book to pick up: an interlibrary loan of book 4 of the Cazalet Chronicle.  We did some weeding along the sidewalk while we were there and I cast a stern eye on the clump of salal that wants to run to the right and interfere with the rhododendron.

I am sure its horrid roots are firmly entrenched under the sidewalk.

I am sure its horrid roots are firmly entrenched under the sidewalk.  I want it gone.

I placed the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (rescued from mowing in the Golden Sands lawn) atop the wall  and Allan planted it.  The ones that had not been mowed flat, he cut back hard to avoid them looking wilty to passersby.

placing Rozanne at the Community Building

placing Rozanne at the Community Building

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, a planting place for Rozanne

pulling bindweed

pulling bindweed

Long Beach

the welcome sign

the welcome sign

welcomeback5-20

after pulling some horsetail

after pulling some horsetail

Next on the Long Beach town list: weeding the big pop out.

It was a pleasantly cool day for comfy clothes.

It was a pleasantly cool day for comfy clothes.

after...just a little better.  The roses are rambunctious.

after…just a little better. The rugosa roses are rambunctious. I regret planting them here.

We checked on all the planters on the Bolstad approach.  A Mental Health Walk was planned along there for Saturday, sponsored by NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness).

lots of sand in planters closest to the beach (Allan's photo) due to recent winds

lots of sand in planters closest to the beach due to recent winds (Allan’s photo)

beach sand and verbascum (Allan's photo)

beach sand and verbascum (Allan’s photo)

This darling little dog was ignoring his guardian.  He came to us and Allan nabbed him and carried him back to her.

little dog on the loose (Allan's photo)

little dog on the loose (Allan’s photo)

I found some of the usual theft (which is one reason why the beach approach planters are especially challenging, the others being sand, salt, drought and wind).

one side: nice little golden thyme tucked in on the edge under the catmint

one side: nice little golden thyme tucked in on the edge under the catmint

other side: matching thyme is gone, and the catmint is a small division to replace one that was stolen earlier.

other side: matching thyme is gone, and the catmint is a small division to replace one that was stolen earlier.

Someone treats these planters as their own personal nursery of free plants.  I put golden thyme back on the shopping list, hoping the Basket Case still had some of the same cultivar.

Allan weeding

Allan weeding

big footprints in the sand

big footprints in the sand

a bit of weeding on the beach approach ground level

a bit of weeding on the beach approach ground level

I realized with glee that our weeding job earlier this spring had been so effective that we could probably touch up the entire beach approach garden in just one day.  Soon, I hope.

rugosa roses

rugosa roses

view looking east

view looking east

the fairy door some good fairy added to a planter

the fairy door some good fairy added to a planter

am thrilled to see some of the poppy seeds that I planted have germinated

am thrilled to see some of the poppy seeds that I planted have germinated

How beautiful thyme is when it is left alone to establish rather than being swiped.

How beautiful thyme is when it is left alone to establish rather than being swiped.

DSC09045

DSC09044

To my delight, I found another fairy door in the garden.

telephoto so as not to disturb the occupants

telephoto so as not to disturb the occupants

roses that were cut back to the ground not long ago

rugosa roses that were cut back to the ground not long ago

reminder to self while parked near city hall: must remember to weed that tatty garden of not much up head on the corner

reminder to self while parked near city hall: must remember to weed that tatty garden of not much up ahead on the corner

Jo’s Garden

We planted a plethora of painted sage in Jo’s garden.

Jo's center courtyard

Jo’s center courtyard

center courtyard daylily

center courtyard daylily

northwest garden bed

northwest garden bed

The center of the shasta daisy patch is lower than the edges.  I think it because the Cow Wow! mulch got spread more thickly along the edge.

Plants respond to Cow Wow.

Plants respond to Cow Wow.  The center is lower.  Phlox is along the fence.

west garden bed

west garden bed

north side of house

north side of house, looking east

center courtyard

center courtyard

guest cottage

guest cottage

painted sage (Salvia viridis) added to entry garden

painted sage (Salvia viridis) added to entry garden

salvias planted (Allan's photo)

salvias planting before (Allan’s photos)

and after

and after

With all this planting of salvia viridis going on, I had better show new readers what it looks like:

Salvia viridis

Salvia viridis

I was relieved to see that the entry garden had begun to grow out of a mysterious problem of repeatedly dying foliage.  Jo was not at home till later today, but she texted me that she had figured it out.  She had sprayed with that anti-mosquito recipe that has been making the rounds on Facebook, with ingredients including mouthwash and epsom salts.  In the areas she sprayed, the plant leaves were burned.  Mystery solved!  Beware of where you spray that recipe (and note that Google will tell you it’s not very effective, anyway).

The big Annuals Planting Time is officially over for work, leaving only the rest of my annuals planting at home.

Basket Case Greenhouse

We couriered the cheque for plants from Long Beach over to the Basket Case Greenhouse.

in the perennial house

in the perennial house

Geranium 'Orion', supposed to be even better than 'Rozanne'

Geranium ‘Orion’, supposed to be even better than ‘Rozanne’

I recommend these echibeckias for long season of colour, even though they were not hardy for me.  I was going to plant eight of them at Golden Sands!  OH WELL!

I recommend these echibeckias for long season of colour, even though they were not hardy for me. I was going to plant eight of them at Golden Sands! OH WELL!

With all the salvias out of the van, I actually had room to buy my two hanging baskets!

perusing the Blooming availability list, and remembering (finally) two hens and chickens for Diane's little planter

perusing the Blooming availability list, and remembering (finally) two hens and chickens for Diane’s little planter

I did get one golden thyme, then ran out of steam to go back to the beach approach and plant it.

World Kite Museum

We added Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost to improve the garden.

DSC04242

It takes an effort to get the tightly compacted mulch out of the bale.

It takes an effort to get the tightly compacted mulch out of the bale.

Our friend Patty, the museum store manager and official Garden Waterer, came out to admire.

Our friend Patty, the museum store manager and official Garden Waterer, came out to admire.

Ilwaco

In order to not have to water on Sunday, we drove around to all the Ilwaco planters and added just enough water to make them happy, without getting out the water trailer or the usual 20 buckets for bucket watering.  Thanks to rain this past week, they each needed just an empty Costco sized mixed nuts jar dipper full of water.

freshly planted not long ago

freshly planted not long ago

I did not plant any nasturtium seeds in the planters this year because last year, the deer feasted on them.

By the boatyard garden: someone had picked a bouquet and then abandoned it in a planter...which is not the meaning of the signs that read "please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy"!

By the boatyard garden: someone had picked a bouquet and then abandoned it in a planter…which is not the meaning of the signs that read “please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy”!

boatyard garden, looking south

boatyard garden, looking south

DSC09076

north fence...once upon a time I had a garden along here, too.

north fence…once upon a time I had a garden along here, too.  It got dug up when new utility lines were installed.

east: the leaning tree garden and one little planter

east: the leaning tree garden and one little planter

DSC09084

center: Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

center: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

south end of boatyard garden

south end of boatyard garden

Salt Pub

After a brief time at home, I went out again to meet Our Kathleen for dinner at Salt Pub.  Allan stayed home because he was loading up his boat for a sailing adventure in Portland tomorrow.

Salt

Salt Hotel and Skookum Surf (surfing lessons)

I had just had time to pick a bouquet, something I try to do weekly for Salt because I value the place highly.

I had just had time to pick a bouquet, something I try to do weekly for Salt because I value the place highly.

my delicious chili

my delicious chili

Kathleen's nachos

Kathleen’s nachos

We had the baked to order cookie with ice cream for dessert; so good, and the end of such an eventful work week, that I forgot to take a photo.  We had been so deep in conversation that I had not even photographed the view of the port.

the moon over Salt after dinner

the moon over Salt after dinner

later, on my lap: Smokey and Frosty

later, on my lap: Smokey and Frosty

Now for two days off in my garden.  I have a desire to not leave my property even for the Saturday Market.  Meanwhile, Allan will be off on a Saturday adventure.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my  mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 71):

May 20:  1:00-7:40 with time out to eat.  HOT  Spent almost all afternoon planting flower seed (finally).  I love doing this job outside so it doesn’t matter if I’m sloppy.  Then I spent the evening sorting my seeds into: Do now, do next, do later i.e. plant in fall, winter, etc.

1997 (age 73):

May 20:  ?-5:30  Dahlias were my #1 job for today but it was raining.  It cleared up in early afternoon so I went out and got all the dahlias planted!  Then I started pulling the bedraggled forget me nots, the yellow invasive plants and sweet woodruff.  I am going to plant some seeds in front to see how they do.

1998 (age 74):

May 20: cool-rainy.  I had the blahs today.  I really didn’t want to go out but I did around 2:00.  I potted some tomatoes and needed more room in the greenhouse so I dragged the “window box” begonias out.  (Don’t ask me how I managed that.)  I replaced the tubs of tulips with the begonia boxes.  Then it started raining.  I also moved several trays of tomatoes to the greenhouse to be repotted (maybe tomorrow).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 19 May 2016

I woke after five hours of sleep with the feeling of a broken heart.  Of course, my first thought was about the lost (to me) garden at Golden Sands, and the astilbes and lilies that were about to bloom.

I had not yet written the post about it, the one you may have read yesterday.  I would not have time for that catharsis for at least three days (as this blog tends to run four days or more behind).

When I did publish yesterday’s story, I appreciated your many comments, both here and on Facebook. I especially liked this, written by Carol Sheaffer, who perfectly and poetically expressed my vision for that garden:

Your plantings and dedication were given to/for the seniors to experience a peace filled vision of beauty to help with their own memories and day dreams.”

Exactly.  The words of comfort, inspiration about letting go, and appreciation that poured in both here and on Facebook were a great help to me…but that was in the future on this particular Thursday.

I had recently read an article about how helpful gardens are to people with dementia.  “Doctors should prescribe gardening for patients more often”, in The Guardian.  A friend with severe chronic pain pointed out correctly that gardening is not a tonic for that, nor, in the experience of friends of mine, is it a reliable cure for deep depression.  What spoke to me in this article was this:

“Outdoor spaces including gardens can reduce social isolation among older people as well as help patients recover and manage conditions such as dementia, according to the influential King’s Fund health thinktank.  ….

Dementia patients can benefit from being near a garden and one study cited in the report found a 19% reduction in violence in patients staying in garden sites and a sevenfold increase in violence in the non-garden sites during a year. Many studies suggest that a garden changes how residents, staff and visitors interact in the long term and can help people reconnect with their past interests.”  This could have been an argument (among many!) successfully presented to the powers that be that pulled the plug on the Golden Sands garden.  It is one of the many reasons that it would be a shame to have that garden decline.  I still hope some knowledgeable volunteers step up to care for it, and that they (these imaginary volunteers) are allowed to keep it as a flower garden that evokes memories of gardens past.

However, it is done.  Once I got up and went out to check on my mother’s three transplanted shrubs (two roses and a rhodie), I felt fine again except for sleep deprivation.  

Mom's "Red Velvet" rose in the window this morning (her name for it, don't know the actual name).

Mom’s “red velvet” rose flowers in the window this morning (her name for it, don’t know the actual name).


Mom's rhodie looks fine, with no wilt at all.

Mom’s rhodie looks fine, with no wilt at all.


the "red velvet" rose this morning

the “red velvet” rose this morning in the garden


Her melianthus major also looks fine even though a big piece of the root broke off in transplanting.

Her Melianthus major also looks fine even though a big piece of the root broke off in transplanting.


the middle garden with Allium albopilosum

the middle garden with Allium albopilosum

Last night, I finished Lust and Wonder by Augusten Burroughs.  I liked it, although I felt sorry for his former significant other who got written about rather harshly.  And I don’t like the way he judges people by their appearance.  What I liked best were his passages about being a catastrophizer. My own tendency to catastrophize is why I had hoped that my fears that the garden would be lost to me were just another case of me imagining the worst.

DSC08963

DSC08964

DSC08965

DSC08967

I also enjoyed the following passage because of the many times that Allan and I are almost hit by bicycles tearing down the sidewalks (illegally) in Long Beach.  We much prefer skateboards because we can hear them coming.

DSC08966

Last night, I had forgotten to update the work board.  Here is what remained this morning:

DSC09010

We took with us lots of painted sage, the special cosmos ‘Seashells’ and ‘Double Click’, and the tray of Cosmos ‘Sensation’ mix that had been intended for Golden Sands, with the intent of finding other homes for them.

Ilwaco

We planted one of the extra cosmos six packs down at Mike’s garden.

The post office garden has no room for more.

The post office garden has no room for more.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


DSC04170

adding some more painted sage at the post office


Allan planting two Helenium at the boatyard garden.

Allan planting two Helenium at the boatyard garden.


at the boatyard (Allan's photo)

at the boatyard (Allan’s photo)

I had considered adding just a few painted sage at the boatyard.  However, next week we will be doing a thorough pre-Memorial Day weekend weeding of horsetail.  IF we have any sage left, that would be the time to add some.  Meanwhile, we went to Time Enough Books and added a few to the garden boat.

moving on in a light mist

moving on in a light mist

The Depot Restaurant

The Depot got its painted sage and Cosmos ‘Seashells’ and ‘Double Click’.  I also found a home there for one of the mown-down Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I had rescued yesterday.

Allan's photo: It replaced part of an area of Schizostylis.

Allan’s photos: It replaced part of an area of Schizostylis.


a new home for one chopped back Rozanne.

a new home for one chopped back Rozanne.


pulling bindweed

pulling bindweed in the rain


north side of dining deck; one of the big logs has been pushed in by a nosy vehicle.

north side of dining deck; one of the big logs has been pushed in by a nosy vehicle.  No plants were harmed (yet, but I do catastrophize about what would happen if the log gets pushed further in).

Long Beach

The planting session in Long Beach, during which I hoped to get all the painted sage into the planters, started in a cold and gusty rain.

Cornus 'Hedgerows Gold' added to Fifth Street Park.  It will have to grow taller to show up well.

Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’ added to Fifth Street Park. It will have to grow taller to show up well. (Allan’s photo)

The rain lightened to a fine mist, easy to work in, and perfect planting weather.  Nothing needed to be watered in; the soil was damp way down, we did not have to hook up the hose to each planter, and it could not have been more wonderful to plant. We accomplished our mission of finishing every planter.  I even had ONE bidens with me to replace one that I found stolen.  If any more get stolen, I am out of luck as I have used every bidens available at local nurseries.

I noticed that the foliage on the occasional annual had turned purple, indicating it is still too cold for their comfort at night.  It was not endemic so I won’t worry.  If all were like this, I’d be in a right old state.

a purpled, pinched back cosmos

a purpled, pinched back cosmos


and an annual salvia gone purple leaved

and an annual salvia gone purple leaved


Reminder to self: shear these rugosa roses back from the sidewalk edge.  These were cut to ground level in March.

Reminder to self: shear these rugosa roses back from the sidewalk edge. These were cut to ground level in March.


Basket Case basket by the police station

Basket Case basket by the police station

Because the planting had gone so well, we had time to weed the planters on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

a planter we dug out and replanted last fall

Allan photographing a planter we dug out and replanted last fall


variegated thyme (Allan's photo)

variegated thyme (Allan’s photo)


I love santolinas in a beach planter.  But why is there only one catmint?

I love santolinas in a beach planter. But why is there only one catmint?


Mature thymes are so gorgeous if they make it past the tiny, cute, and easily stolen stage.

Mature thymes are so gorgeous if they make it past the tiny, cute, and easily stolen stage.


thyme (Allan's photo)

thyme (Allan’s photo)

We had timed the day to finish it with cleaning up the entry garden and planting some cosmos and painted sage at the World Kite Museum.  Allan’s photos:

before

before


before

before


The soil in this small bed is intensely rooty, perhaps from the escallonia roots invading from the side.

The soil in this small bed is intensely rooty, perhaps from the escallonia roots invading from the side.  Despite all the rain, it was dry underneath, and not from lack of hose watering.


Snails love to hitch a ride on the bottom of the six packs of plants.

Snails love to hitch a ride on the bottom of the six packs of plants.


after

after


after.  I decided it badly needs mulch...tomorrow.

after. I decided it badly needs mulch…tomorrow.


Shrubs on either side are poking up with their roots.

Shrubs on either side are poking up with their roots.  They will enjoy the mulch, too.


after work: still misting

after work: still misting

We left the the Kite Museum with time to dump our load of debris at Long Beach city works yard.  On the way there, in the pocket garden at Culbertson Field, I saw some dead bulb foliage that necessitated an emergency weeding stop.  We ran out of time for our debris dump.

The Cove Restaurant

We arrived at our weekly dinner with Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) only a few minutes late.  Outside, Lacey the golf course mascot loved getting a belly rub.

Lacey

Lacey

DSC04196

DSC04201

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Sondra's garden at the restaurant entrance

Sondra’s garden at the restaurant entrance, nicely mulched


I had very much been looking forward to this cider.

I had very much been looking forward to this cider.


Annika was singing.

Annika was singing.


artichoke fries

artichoke fries


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Sondra making us laugh (Allan's photo)

Sondra making us laugh (Allan’s photo)


Melissa's elegantly presented dinner

Melissa’s elegantly presented dinner


after dinner (Allan's photo)

after dinner (Allan’s photo)

Because it was still just light when we left the restaurant at 9:00 o’ clock, we went to the works yard after all and had the satisfaction of getting rid of our debris.  (We have our own key, since our hours differ from that of the city crew.)

almost full moon over the works yard

almost full moon over the works yard

At home, the work board shows that Annuals Planting Time is almost over:

DSC09012


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

May 19: Robert’s birthday—Omaha Steaks.  Drs appt and errands—dentist office, vets for Tabby’s Advantage, Tim’s for Rx and Gordon’s [Nursery].  [Robert was my spouse and co-gardener during those years.]

1998 (age 74):

May 19:  I decided to plant some of the petunia seeds concentrating on the basket petunias at about two and I got tired of sitting so I went out and started repotting tomatoes and pepper seedlings.  Alan [a neighbor] came over and was real interested and he planted some tomatoes and sieved the seed in the wheelbarrow.  He said he would hang my baskets next week.

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Friday, 30 May 2014

Larry and Robert’s garden

Even though we had the whole of Long Beach town to check, we simply had to do some weeding at Larry and Robert’s garden just five doors down.  I found the casualty of a gold leaved hardy fuchsia and sacrificed the one that I had in a pot at home to replace it in order to keep the front garden in balance.

Allan weeding

Allan planting a hardy fuchsia

the east side, weeded

the east side, weeded

the corner garden looks good...

The corner garden looks good…

with Allium schubertii

with Allium schubertii

but I feel it needs more plants, as will the west side garden bed when we get it dug out (next week, I hope!)

but I feel it needs more plants, as will the west side garden bed when we get it dug out (next week, I hope!)

Ilwaco planters

We replaced five more Erysimums in the Ilwaco planters before going plant shopping for the Larry and Robert project.

We parked by the boatyard to redo one of the planters by Eagle Street.

We parked by the boatyard to redo one of the planters by Eagle Street.

I have a finger blight story to share about the boatyard garden.  A few weeks ago, I wondered why it was not blooming yet.  Today I read this story in a thread on Facebook about stolen planters, and it all became clear.  This is despite signs that say “Please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy.”

A passerby’s story from the last week in April: ” The week before Loyalty Days and the Blessing of the fleet I was driving to Ilwaco. Walking along the road next to the boat yard were 2 adult women and 4 children. The children we picking every one of the flowers in the flowerbeds. Not just one or two, but each child had a handful of the beautiful flowers that The City of Ilwaco pays to plant and maintain. The flowers were so pretty and would have been delightful for everyone to enjoy, especially for the Kids parade and Blessing of the fleet visitors…… but they were ALL PICKED. A friend of mine also saw them picking and stopped to say something about leaving them for all to see and was told by the two moms that “Kids Pick Flowers” and that there was nothing wrong with them doing it.. They had their permission to have a field day and strip all the flowers. Two of the kids actually came up to her car and hissed like a cat and said go away, we can do whatever we want.”

I wonder what would have happened if Allan or I had been there and said we were the gardeners????

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Allan switched the Olde Towne Café compost bucket while I added a few more trailies to the planter on that block.

Allan switched the Olde Towne Café compost bucket while I added a few more trailies to the planter on that block.

The café was bustling.

Basket Case Greenhouse

Next we simply had to go to the Basket Case to check out the new shipment of perennials!

I needed one of these pink Gauras to balance out a planter in Long Beach.

I needed one of these pink Gauras to balance out a planter in Long Beach.

I acquired a selection of cool perennials to add to Larry and Robert’s garden next week.  Among them:

Phygelius 'Yellow Trumpet'

Phygelius ‘Yellow Trumpet’

and some Dianthus

and some Dianthus

and some Eupatorium ‘Gateway’, Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and more.

and for me, a chocolate flower

and for me, a chocolate flower

and some sweet basil for my little greenhouse

and some sweet basil for my little greenhouse

There are still loads of annuals available.

There are still loads of annuals available.

I’ve been trying to explain to our client Erin just how big the tiny tulip tree that she had us plant in her back yard is going to get.  So I took this photo of Allan photographing flowers of the specimen just north of the Basket Case.

Liriodendron tulipifera

Liriodendron tulipifera

and its flowers

and its flowers

Long Beach

By the time we got to Long Beach, we had only three and a half hours to do the whole town before a dinner engagement.

We began with a boost: A quick stop at Pink Poppy Bakery’s shop by the Long Beach arch for four little lemon curd hand pies.  Allan got a photo of Madeline’s mixer tattoo.

a baker's friend

a baker’s friend

After we snarfed the hand pies, Allan weeded Fifth Street Park while I walked four blocks worth of planters, then we did the two north blocks of planters together and checked the ones on the beach approach streets.  A miserable cold 20 mph north wind blew throughout the whole Long Beach job.

In the southernmost planter, I tried an experiment and cut back just the front half of the Sedum 'Autumn Joy'.

In the southernmost planter, I tried an experiment and cut back just the front half of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

the rose in the planter by frying pan part of Fifth Street park is doing its one time set of blooms.

the rose in the planter by frying pan part of Fifth Street park is doing its one time set of blooms.

pretty while it lasts; then I will cut it all the way back.

pretty while it lasts; then I will cut it all the way back.  The sign goes back to when volunteers did the planters.

flowers, and folks getting the classic frying pan tourist photo.

flowers, and folks getting the classic frying pan tourist photo.

I was pleased to see that where someone picked the verbascum stalk a little while back, new buds have formed.

I was pleased to see that where someone picked the verbascum stalk a little while back, new buds have formed.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' and 'Jade Frost' in that park garden bed

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and ‘Jade Frost’ in that park garden bed

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

and a bee

and a bee

Three allium albopilsoum twined together

Three Allium albopilsoum twined together

Basket Case baskets at the police station

Basket Case baskets at the police station

That rose on the Funland south wall, planted by me years ago.

That rose on the Funland south wall, planted by me years ago.

berries and cream

berries and cream?

Fifth Street Park garden

Fifth Street Park garden

Captain Bob's Chowder, behind the park

Captain Bob’s Chowder, behind the park (with Allium bulgaricum)

Allan suggested we check the kite museum garden; I was tired and could not make words so we had to turn around the block and go back to it.

Kite museum garden looking pretty fine.

Kite museum garden looking pretty fine.

We almost forgot to check the Depot garden, but remembered in time.

Depot in early evening light.

Depot in early evening light.

Ilwaco

We had just enough time to plant two more Erysimum, acquired today at The Basket Case for that purpose, into two more Ilwaco planters, before meeting Olde Towne Luanne for dinner at Pelicano Restaurant at the Port.

Erysimum 'Jade Frost' outside the building that houses Marie Powell Gallery and Pelicano.

Erysimum ‘Jade Frost’ outside the building that houses Marie Powell Gallery and Pelicano.

We were treated Luanne to celebrate her just having completed a personal move to live in Ilwaco.  We are so pleased to have her nearby during non-working hours.  Our conversation was so lively (as just seeing her and especially getting out of the horrid cold wind revived my ability to make words) that I forgot to take any photos of the scrumptious food until dessert.

the view from our table of someone enjoying the window view (tables for two)

the view from our table of someone enjoying the window view (tables for two)

We shared all three of the Pelicano desserts.  Chocolate pot de creme, lemon tart, homemade meringue cookies with homemade ice cream sandwich

We shared all three of the Pelicano desserts. Chocolate pot de creme, lemon tart, homemade meringue cookies with homemade ice cream sandwich

Best of all, we had got enough done so that we could ALMOST take the whole weekend off.  (Allan will have to try out the water trailer for watering the Ilwaco planters, and I have to spend a few hours doing billing for May.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »