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Posts Tagged ‘World Kite Museum’

Wednesday, 20 November, 2013

The morning was so cold that I was glad we were starting with a project other than bulbs:  picking up a trailer load of cow fiber.  At our post office stop, I noticed a cat face on a pumpkin at the house next door.  I think it is new.  It must be a Thanksgiving rather than a Halloween pumpkin.

still seasonal

still seasonal

At the Planter Box around 11:30 AM, we saw evidence of the cold.

pond

Raymond loaded us up with four Bobcat scoops of dairy manure, carefully maneuvering around our small and rather fragile trailer.

incoming

incoming

Allan scraped the pile level with each scoop.

leveling off

leveling off

The sun, while it did provide welcome warmth, glared in an irksome and blinding way all day long from its uncomfortably low wintry angle.

scoop number four

scoop number four

getting the last precious bit of cow poo out of the scoop

getting the last precious bit of cow poo out of the scoop

the beautiful pile of beautiful dairy manure

the beautiful pile of beautiful washed dairy manure

Back to Long Beach:  At the World Kite Museum on Sid Snyder Drive in Long Beach, we planted Narcissi, Alliums christophii and schubertii, species Crocus and Iris reticulata.  I had been afraid the ground would be frozen.  It was stiff, but diggable.  The nice layer of mulch on top will keep the bulbs snug.

mulch

It is a small patch of garden for such a big building.

in context

in context

Brainstorm:  The strip of lawn along the sidewalk should be removed all the way along where the Hebes are planted.  I have thought this before.  Perhaps, if we can get the go ahead, we will do that in February.

That grass needs digging out!

That grass needs digging out!

There is also a ridiculous spot inside the Escallonias that needs to be newspapered and then mulched to save someone from having to try to get a mower or strimmer into there.

an unfortunate grassy patch

an unfortunate grassy patch

From the Kite Museum, we went back to Diane’s garden and laid mulch all down the bed where we had planted bulbs yesterday.

during, and after

during, and after

deliciously fluffy now

deliciously fluffy now

We had enough mulch for the blueberry patch but not enough for a small bed against the northeast corner of the house, an area where extra plants get popped in.

Oops!

Oops!

I could get free horse manure from right next door at the Red Barn just for this spot, even though I do find horse manure to be horribly weedy.

The Cow Fiber we had used at the Kite Museum would have been the perfect amount for this spot, dag nab it.

Surprised that it was just a bit past one o ‘clock—How had we gotten so much done in two hours??—we went back to The Planter Box for another load.

The difficult to work in angle of the sun made pots of Bright Lights Swiss Chard live up to their name.

Bright Lights Swiss Chard

Bright Lights Swiss Chard

as did Heather 'Wickwar Flame'

as did Heather ‘Wickwar Flame’

ornamental cabbages for sale

ornamental cabbages for sale

I wandered to the back of the nursery because the reflections in the big pond had caught my eye.

pond

trunks

sketchy

sketchy

We drove all the way to The Wiegardt Gallery simply because it would be such a satisfying mulching job to accomplish.

along the front of the gallery

along the front of the gallery

newly cleared beds, "bulbed" last week

recently cleared (of Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson) beds, “bulbed” last week, mulched today

The sun finally went down behind some trees, reducing some of the glare.

sun

Even though it was barely three o’clock, the temperature began to drop.

We could not bear to quit work quite this early in the day, even though I had recently checked my email and learned that the 30% off final end of season bulb sale had begun on the Van Engelen website!

So we went to Jo’s and did some pulling of cosmos.

before and after

before and after

I can see Joe got tired of waiting for us and cleaned out her own window boxes.  She likes annuals to be removed and perennials cut all the way down in fall.  We have a long way to go on this garden clean up.  Today we only lasted an hour because our hands got so cold, the sun was setting, and the bulb sale was on my mind.

I pulled the last of the Salvia viridis

I pulled the last of the Salvia viridis

many weeds await our return in slightly warmer weather

many weeds await our return in slightly warmer weather

birds on one of Jo's feeders

birds on one of Jo’s feeders

We rushed home, as we would need to go out again at five, and I placed a quick end of season sale for my garden:

bulb order

I will be very curious about whether or not they will ship the Alliums.  The catalog says they won’t, but I have heard they DO ship them to the Seattle area.  This is the first year there has been a restriction of Alliums shipped to Washington.  I have also heard that Western Washington state Costcos and other stores have had Alliums for sale.  I did not even really mean to order any.  My fingers just had to click on my favourite Allium at 20% off, and I did not realize what I had done till the order was finalized.  Our area has no commercial onion crop, so perhaps that is why the company is selectively shipping Alliums.

At a little after five, we were back out for an art gallery opening at The Cove Restaurant featuring the art of our friend Jean Nitzel of The Picture Attic in Long Beach.  As the event was so successful and crowded, we toured the paintings but did not linger.

a happy crowd

a happy crowd at jean’s art opening

This little bird:  sold.

This little bird: sold.  Photo by Robbie Richeson

Yesterday at the sushi benefit, landscaper Ed Strange had told us about a wonderful new Mexican dinner night on Wednesdays at The Lightship Restaurant and we wanted to try it out.  We suspected Ed would be there, and he was indeed.

Our Ed Strange

Our Ed Strange

Ed wants to get the word out about this excellent weekly dinner so that it is successful and stays with us.  Here we go:

Mexican Fiesta night has not been "discovered" yet.

Mexican Fiesta night has not been “discovered” yet.

As Ed had promised, the chef made fresh guacamole at tableside.

fresh quacamole for each table

fresh quacamole for each table

the ingredients

the ingredients

guac

guac

couldn't be fresher

couldn’t be fresher

All of the food was delicious…prepared from the chefs’ grandmas’ traditional recipes, Ed told us.

food

chicken molé and steak fajitas

We will return next week to try other items on the Wednesday night Mexican dinner menu.

On the way home, we saw that the lights on the Long Beach clam and world’s largest frying pan have been lit.

holiday lights

holiday lights

Especially exciting to me are the ground level lights to the left.  They mean the underground wiring and lighting are done in that garden bed, and tomorrow we can finish planting the Long Beach bulbs.

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the scourge of horsetail

the scourge of horsetail

This morning I woke too early and observed a lack of rain. Lay awake torn between being glad to catch up on work and wishing I had a rainy day off to read more of Tootlepedal’s blog. (On a sunny day off, I have to work out in my garden.) Then came the rain, and with it, more sleep, but I woke again to sunshine and a work day.

We began in our town by deadheading narcissi in the street planters. When we parked next to the boatyard to care for the planters at the intersection of First and Eagle, I was saddened but not surprised to see horsetail popping up in the new section. No time to deal with it today, though.

But the narcissi looked lovely.

boatyard narcissi

boatyard narcissi

Then on to weed the Time Enough Books garden (where I did not notice that the heron is tipped over til I looked at the photo just now!). I am not so egotistical as to paint my name on the boat; that was bookstore owner Karla’s idea!

Time Enough Books garden boat

Time Enough Books garden boat

Species tulips bloomed in the Port Office garden (and I did not even think to check the new garden on the other side of the building!):

north side of Port Office

north side of Port Office

The deer that wander the meander line along the Port parking lots have not discovered the tulips!

I like my little rivulet of grape hyancinths:

Muscari

Muscari

more species tulips by Don Nisbett Art Gallery

more species tulips by Don Nisbett Art Gallery

A digression: As I walked the short distance to our next curbside garden , I reflected on what a shame it is that no one has bought the empty Harbor Lights Motel. It could be such a cute motel (although the lounge and restaurant are what have the harbour view), and many of us locals would so welcome a view lounge that is not a dive. I would like one that did not play canned country music. The old one had some…incidents…such a someone being thrown off the balcony. Just in case a reader who dreams of a harbourside motel might see this, here is the information you need:

Harbor Lights for sale

Harbor Lights for sale

Equity Properties Northwest: 360.253.1212; Woodford 360.501.5500

Just past that empty building, we weeded the new gardens by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

gardens new last fall

gardens new last fall; I forgot to straighten the photo.

In the lower right is a container holding a mix of Zeba Quench and Doctor Earth All Purpose Fertilizer for the planting of some new Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’ and Armeria.

fat low buds of species tulips—wind resistant.

fat low buds of species tulips—wind resistant.

with cute wavy foliage to boot

with cute wavy foliage to boot

white narcissi

white narcissi

Then we went to the Depot Restaurant garden in Seaview. The bulbs look good in the garden we expanded last May:

Depot bulb display

Depot bulb display

I planted, in the new herb garden by the kitchen door, some oregano brought down from Marilyn’s garden in Surfside (she being the mother in law of Chef Michael).

On the way to our next job, we dropped some more plants by Nancy’s garden. I am snagging the best of the best from the Basket Case Greenhouse’s selection for her. This time, we added 3 Delphinium ‘Butterfly Blue’, 3 Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’, a Phygelius ‘Cherry Red’, a Brunnera ‘Looking Glass’, a Heuchera ‘Stormy Seas’, and some free divisions fo golden marjoram, pineapple sage, and white phlox. Another friend of Nancy’s had planted some scilla in the main new garden bed and I said “No, no, no!” because I know how invasive it is. Most of my clients are trying to get rid of it. I suggested it go off at the end by the salmonberries, and the suggestion was well-received.

Nancy's new bed

Nancy’s new bed

Of course, some people might think the grape hyacinth that I planted are also invasive…eventually…but their foliage is not as apt to smother other plants.

Nancy's tulips

Nancy’s tulips

Muscari

Muscari

Narcissi with multiple flowers in two colours!

Narcissi with multiple flowers in two colours!

On our last visit, I failed to get a good photo of the new patio and berry patch in progress:

Nancy and Phil's new patio

Nancy and Phil’s new patio

And her excellent edible garden, where she is miles ahead of me:

the edible garden

the edible garden

It would have been nice to stay for coffee, but we moved on because we had not checked on The Anchorage this week and I do try to get to each resort garden once a week. (This week, though, we did not make it to Klipsan Beach Cottages at all, but I know they will take care of anything that looks terrible.)

On the way, traffic through Long Beach was spring break slow, enabling me to photograph a couple of our planters from the car.

Fifth Street

Fifth Street

Bolstadt

Bolstadt

I do hope people are enjoying the nicely weeded Bolstadt Beach Approach garden that we recently spent so much time on.

We made a stop at The Planter Box to buy some amendments for an area at Anchorage where the soil had been looking beaten down.

at the Planter Box

at the Planter Box

When I have time, I will comb through their plant selections for Nancy’s garden. This is definitely where I will be getting my tall cosmos and my painted sage, both of which they are growing from seed.

Clematis armandii 'Snowdrift'

Clematis armandii ‘Snowdrift’ at the Planter Box

At the Anchorage, we spread the nice soil amendment…

Gardener and Bloome Soil Building Compost

Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost

and I contemplated how much I dislike Sweet Woodruff, another groundcover that many love but I have come to loathe.

Sweet Woodruff and wild beach strawberry both annoy me in the garden.

Sweet Woodruff and wild beach strawberry both annoy me in the garden.

Here is a photo for Kathleen Shaw to show just where the trilliums are located. (The Anchorage is her home from home till the happy day for all of us when she can move here.)

where the trillium do grow

where the trillium do grow

I do not like that broken paver, but I did not put it there, so I had better leave it alone.

Allan made a bamboo and string trellis for our traditional sweet pea spot in the office courtyard.

this year's trellis

this year’s trellis

Maroon and Yellow Tulip 'Gavota' goes well with brick.

Maroon and Yellow Tulip ‘Gavota’ goes well with brick.

Fritillaria meleagris 'Alba' in a container by the office.

Fritillaria meleagris ‘Alba’ in a container by the office.

the center courtyard

the center courtyard

I swear I did not mean to line those tulips up like soldiers. I suspect that Allan planted them!

When we departed, Allan suggested that we at last remember to check on the Kite Museum garden and I am happy to say we found only a little bit of cutting back of perennials (especially a Gaura), nothing too embarrassingly neglectful.

I do so much like these Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’.

Ocean Magic grape hyacinth

Ocean Magic grape hyacinth at Kite Museum

I forgot to take a photo of the entire little garden till we were about to drive away.

little kite bed

little kite bed from the car

And then, home. On the way to the Port I had been struck by how good Larry and Robert’s narcissi look so I walked the half block from home to photograph them in the last light, in case tomorrow’s storm beats them up.

the new garden boat

the new garden boat

the narcissi show

the narcissi show

That new Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ had better be leafing out. I need to take a closer look soon. Mine is just barely budding so I hope this one is ok.

I could not get past the Hornbuckle garden without some photos….

Tom and Judy's tulips

Tom and Judy’s tulips

their new porch peace sign: very nice

their new porch peace sign: very nice

and more Hornbuckle tulips

and more Hornbuckle tulips

(I hear they are redoing their back patio water feature. Photos will come…)

At home, I picked a bouquet of tulips for my neighbour, Nora….. I have photographing my garden in bits and pieces all week for tomorrow’s entry.

And that was an easy day. Why, some might ask, would I think it was easy when we went to so many places? Because the wind was only somewhat annoying, and had no rain with it. Because it is much easier to scat about between jobs than work all day doing the same thing (like on the beach approach). Because I got to sleep in, and got to visit with two friends.

The only bad thing about today is that by the time I have finished this, I have no time left to read another month of the year 2011 in Tootlepedal’s blog. Perhaps tomorrow there will be a rainy gale and I can read the entire rest of that year (April through December). He writes prolifically every single day so it will take awhile…and then there will be all of 2012 to enjoy.

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Kite Museum

In late June, the World Kite Museum hired us to reclaim a tiny little garden that we had helped make years ago.  The idea had been that volunteers would maintain it, but over time it had reverted to pure grass and weeds.

26 June, 6:30 PM

26 June, 6:30 PM

Being terribly busy, we started the project in the early evening.  I am pleased to report that the weedy grass peeled off fairly easily, and we had thought ahead to bring some soil and plants with us, so the results were swift.

9 PM the same day

9 PM the same day

24 August

24 August

Diane’s Garden

In September, we weeded a strip along the road at Diane’s garden on Sandridge Road.

the beginning

the beginning: mid September

The weather was so hot and dry that we waited till late September to plant.

late September

late September

The whole project was inspired when Diane saw this heather for sale at The Planter Box and wanted to showcase it in a new garden.  Because there was not enough for the whole long stretch (and also because I prefer variety), we added Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and some lavenders to the mix.

pale pink heather

pale pink heather

late September

late September

At Diane’s request, we edged it with river rock from Peninsula Landscape Supply.  Later we planted many the Narcissi bulb so we are hoping for great things in spring of 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Immediately upon my return from the Sylvia Beach Hotel, Allan and I plunged into three projects that had been pressing upon the schedule: A new bed at the World Kite Museum, a new bed at a private home in Vandalia, and helping with landscape installation at the new Willapa Behavioral Health Center.

WKM bed before and during; this will be a bright colour spot

World Kite Museum director Kay Buesing lined up volunteers to help us with stage one of the new gardens, designed by Kathleen Sayce.

volunteer gardeners at World Kite Museum

The volunteer crew did not sit down on the job despite how it looks.  Right, the bed finished, and thickly planted with narcissi from that very last bulb order from Colorblends.  (I’d never ordered from them before, and was thrilled to find a Colorblends coffee mug and a crumpled newspaper from Amsterdam in with the bags of tulips and narcissi.)

Next, we put in a new bed of grasses and perennials at a private home next to the small Ilwaco airport. The ground had already been tilled.    All we had to do was acquire the plants, rocks, and topsoil, and then mulch, make a decorative rock border, and plant.

Garden bed, before and after; the wee stakes mark clusters of bulbs.

That’s me working…and our client coming home in his plane.

Finally, for the last of the special fall projects, we helped install plants for the wetland mitigation landscape at the new Willapa Behavioral Health building.

Willapa Behavioral Health swale planting project designed by Kathleen Sayce and installed by Doug Ray of Carex Consulting

The wettest spots in the swale were planted with Redtwig Dogwood and Darmera Peltata.  All native plants in appropriate drainage areas should thrive and be restful to the eye.  Meanwhile, Allan and I had earlier planted a patch of narcissi by the front entry and roped it off.  We found the ropes down but after a little altercation (not quite fisticuffs!) with the builders, we got the ropes back up and an agreement that it would not be walked on any further!  I think the contractor fellow thought I was going to back down…ha!

[2012 note:  We have almost completely stopped taking any job where we plant up a garden and then don’t get to take care of it.  But after swearing I never would again, I have agreed to such a project in Long Beach because it’s small and interesting and I can tell the owners are real gardeners who WILL care for it.]

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