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Posts Tagged ‘yellow cosmos’

Tuesday, 30 June 2015

Jo’s garden

There’s never any aggro in Jo’s beautiful garden, which we weeded and groomed today in preparation of Jo and Bob having the usual houseful of guests for the 4th of July.

guest cottage windowbox

guest cottage windowbox

entering Jo's garden

entering Jo’s garden

to the right

to the right

verbascum and Nicotiana 'langsdorfii'

Nicotiana ‘langsdorfii’ and  verbascum and Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Allium albopilosum and schubertii

Allium albopilosum and schubertii

diascias

diascias and annual geraniums

gate to west garden

gate to west garden

opening the gate

opening the gate

center courtyard

center courtyard

north wall of house, center courtyard

north wall of house, center courtyard

container by Basket Case Greenhouse

container by Basket Case Greenhouse

looking west

looking west

Here’s something cool and amazing:  One of the cosmos came out yellow.  There is a tall garden cosmos called ‘Yellow Garden’ that I have grown before, but it did not bloom till October here so I only used it one year.  (The Planter Box started it for me.)

yellow cosmos

yellow cosmos

If this were in my garden, I'd be hoping to collect seeds.

If this were in my garden, I’d be hoping to collect seeds.

Bees like all colours of cosmos.

Bees like all colours of cosmos.

The work session at Jo’s took a few hours, and ended up with the pretty much perfection you see above.  Jo and Bob were on a trip to Montana so we did not get to see them or their darling dog, Coco.

The Anchorage Cottages

The Anchorage is also a pleasant and aggravation-free job.  We groomed the gardens and planters in the happy atmosphere of a quiet, popular cottage resort.

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

sit spots among the flowers

sit spots among the flowers

The "Peruvian daffodil" in the center planter has been a big hit with guests.

The “Peruvian daffodil” in the center planter has been a big hit with guests.

one of the old signs

one of the old signs

Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' by the office

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ by the office

office courtyard with thriving sweet peas

office courtyard with thriving sweet peas

Petunia 'Pretty Much Picasso' and Viola 'Etain'

Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ and Viola ‘Etain’

Port of Ilwaco

We cheerfully began watering down at the Port of Ilwaco.

April of the port office staff waters this garden on the south side.

April of the port office staff waters this garden on the south side.

hanging baskets from The Basket Case Greenhouse

hanging baskets from The Basket Case Greenhouse

by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

a grey evening at the port (view from port office)

a grey evening at the port (view from port office)

We have the curbside gardens along Howerton Avenue at the port planted with drought tolerant plants so that (except for new plants) they need watering but once a week.

watering (telephoto by Allan)

watering (telephoto by Allan)

hauling hose to hook up at the next garden (Allan's photo)

hauling hose to hook up at the next garden (Allan’s photo)

This evening, we watered the gardens north of Ilwaco pavilion, the Nisbett Gallery, the port office, Time Enough Books, The Salt Hotel and the garden by the empty building next to the Salt Hotel; Salt is kindly letting us use their water to keep that one alive.

Allan's photo: the son of the owners of Salt Hotel, helping out.

Allan’s photo: the son of the owners of Salt Hotel, helping out.

Salt Hotel helping

Salt Hotel helping

Meanwhile, Allan had hauled 20 buckets of water from the boatyard to the east end garden bed, the one that has no hosepipe anywhere near.   Then we went to the garden bed where the port office staff and port manager had, two weeks ago, gotten an assurance that we could use the business’s hose to water once a week.  I’d had an email to that effect, that even stated that if the building owners put a lock on the faucet, we would be given a key.  I felt so happy that the problem had been resolved.  However, when we approached the hose, the same person who last time told me “You want me to subsidize you for being old” (when I said that, at age 60, I was not up to hauling 40 pound buckets of water from elsewhere to water that garden) emerged to say we could not use it.

I explained that the plants were dry and distressed.  He said he had watered three days ago and that “it rained”.  (Believe me, the few drops of rain were not enough to help any garden, but I chose not to engage on that issue.)  I said I needed to get some water on the plants because they were very stressed and added that it would save money if we did the watering because we knew which plants to target and which needed less water. He said he found me difficult to deal with because I was telling him what he needed to do. I said no, it is what I need to do, get some water on the plants.  (I felt desperate because a couple of the plants were screaming to me for help.)  He then looked said “I don’t trust you because you told me that last year someone told you it was okay to use our hose.”  As I often do, I tried to defuse my shock with some (no doubt not funny) humor.  Allan was standing right next to me and I said “Well…How about it I throw Allan under the bus because he’s the one that was told last year that it was ok to use the hose, so if you want to distrust someone, don’t trust him, but trust ME and let me water the plants.”  But then something exploded inside my mind, and I got my spine back, and I said, “You say that I am difficult to deal with, but you have been very rude to me.  Two weeks ago you told me I wanted you to subsidize me for being OLD. Now you are saying that we are liars.  You’ve never let me explain to you that we have promoted your business on Discover Ilwaco.  You are not treating me like a human being.  Now I am going to walk down to Salt Hotel, because they are civic minded, and I know that they will let me use THEIR hose to water the garden in front of YOUR building.”  It is interesting to look back and realize this was the first time he had not interrupted me (and I wasn’t shouting).  I walked away, and of course the owners of Salt let me use their hose, because they know that beautiful gardens benefit us all (down to the very bees who frequent the portside gardens).

(I thought later, what did I mean by “not treating me like a human being”?  Human beings frequently get treated badly.  I suppose I meant not treating me according the the precepts of the Society for the Humane Treatment of Gardeners.)

By the way, Allan had gone to city hall and found out that 50 gallons of water allegedly costs a great big 26 cents, so each garden would cost a maximum of $4 to $5 extra per month to water from June through September. Probably less on an established bed with no new plants. Might I add that every day we carry, and usually use up, between 10 and 15 gallons of our own water on other people’s gardens.

us, hauling our own water to other people's gardens

us, hauling our own water to other people’s gardens

I was deeply shaken by being told, by someone who does not even know my name, that he does not trust me.  (And yes, we were told we could water that garden last year, and did so openly and obviously all summer long during hours when the business was open.)

Even though I can be articulate in a situation like that, afterwards I cry.  I managed to wait till we had the garden watered with the Salt Hotel hose. We then went to weed the garden at the east end.  Even though Allan had already watered it, I added my tears.  In fact, I blubbered.  I realized that my feelings were hurt. It was physically painful to be treated like someone dishonest and worthless.

east end curbside garden, watered with my tears

east end curbside garden, watered with my tears

east end garden (Allan's photo)

east end garden (Allan’s photo)

parsley and Stipa tenuissima (Allan's photo)

parsley and Stipa tenuissima (Allan’s photo)

I felt defeated.  If this sounds familiar, it is because I already wrote about it in this blog on the day it happened.  I wonder if other public gardeners run into business owners who cannot see that gardens beautify a town and benefit all the businesses?  It’s discouraging to have two businesses at the port this year with an anti-garden attitude.

I am determinedly reminding myself that two bad apples do not spoil my whole barrel and that the wonderful business owners who do care far outweigh the naysayers.

I went home and purchased two squares for the community sourced capital fund for Salt Hotel.  The campaign runs through June 22, so there is still time to participate, which I encourage locals to do.  Here’s the link.  The motto of the community sourced capital program speaks strongly to me: “Fund the world you want to live in.”  I want to live in a world with people who care about beauty, gardens, bees, community, civic mindedness, sharing.

salt

Tomorrow: I try to get a grip, shake off my malaise, and enjoy gardening again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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