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Saturday, 11 April 2015

I had two goals this weekend: to not leave my property and to get a great deal of weeding done.

Allan spent one of the weekend afternoons weeding his garden area and part of ours, and the other on a non-boating excursion (tomorrow’s post).

Allan’s photos of his garden:

left: Thalictrum ‘Illuminator’

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Hart's tongue fern before weeding

Hart’s tongue fern before trimming

and after

and after

Asplenium scolopendrium 'Laceratum Kaye'. Kaye's Lacerated Harts Tongue Fern.   Pam Fleming ID'ed this; Allan had been calling it spinach fern.

Asplenium scolopendrium ‘Laceratum Kaye’. Kaye’s Lacerated Harts Tongue Fern. Pam Fleming ID’ed this; Allan had been calling it spinach fern.

after trimming

after trimming

Alaska fern before

Alaska fern before

after

after

my reading day

admiring Allan's garden from the front porch

admiring Allan’s garden from the front porch

Rain squalls prevented starting till early afternoon.

Rain squalls prevented starting till early afternoon.

kitchen window view

kitchen window view

I had hope because the sky was light around the edges.

I had hope because the sky was light around the edges.

book

I started to read a new library book and was immediately smitten with the story, a memoir by Amanda Palmer, the singer-songwriter of the Dresden Dolls.  I am in the dark about the last 20 years worth of alternative music, which used to be my lifeline. My ignorance is not from getting old; it’s because I lived with someone who increasingly used music as a method of sleep deprivation; when he was angry and drinking, he would play loud music all night (and then sleep in while I went to work). I learned to crave and love silence so very much that I have since then not wanted to have music on in the house. The 3 AM loud music chap and I parted ways over ten years ago. It’s sad, really, to lose the desire to listen to music. Allan listens in his workshop or on headphones. I often think if I became an invalid, I would use the time to catch up. Anyway, I watched three Dresden Dolls videos (Mechanical Boy and Anachronistic Girl and another one by just Amandaand read a bunch of her lyrics in the book and now I’m a fan, although probably a fan who can’t just sit and listen. I would go see her in concert for sure, if I lived in a city. Wish she would perform at The Sou’wester.

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She named her band after one of the most memorably harrowing and agonizing scenes I have ever read in a novel, one that made me cry buckets and that I don’t want to think about because it makes me too sad.

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Being that memorable is the power of good writing; I believe it was in high school or soon after that I Slaughterhouse Five.

This is what music used to do for me:

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And when I listened to songs by Amanda today, I knew that it still could.

Having been married to a Leedsman for a couple of years (1987-1990) for a number of reasons, one perhaps being his accent, I enjoyed this about her courtship with author Neil Gaiman:

accent

my weeding day

Much as Smokey and I would love to have continued to read, the sun came out so by 1:40 I was outside.  My first thought was to weed in the front garden.  It’s embarrassing that people can see weeds when they look over the fence.  I remember a friend and I making fun (between ourselves) of a professional gardener whose garden was all weedy.  He was kind of a mean fellow, so we had our reasons to make fun, but looking back on it, we were just being mean ourselves.  It amused her, and she was going through a terrible time, and I would have done much to amuse her.  I would have put on a clown nose and danced a jig…or participated in a private mean-fest about the guy’s garden…just to make her laugh for a minute.  (Usually I feel sympathy when I see someone’s weeds.)

It is, we all know, much better to refrain from meanness, even in self-defense.  Now it would be karmic justice if someone looked over my fence and make fun of this pro gardener with a zillion weeds.

  With good intention, I took some before photos:

northeast corner with much "stinkmint"

northeast corner with much “stinkmint”

slightly weedy east bed

slightly weedy east bed

an area of bad grass.  And I want to move that heather.  Try though I might, I just cannot like heather in a garden bed.

an area of bad grass. And I want to move that heather into a pot. Try though I might, I just cannot like heather in a garden bed.

weedy path to the water meter

weedy path to the water meter

Two things changed my mind and sent me to weed in the back garden instead.  One:  It was a busy Saturday on the street with lots of people (which is perfectly reasonable), and I felt a need for quiet gardening.  Two:  I remembered that I still need to fertilize the back garden and that I can’t until I get some carpets of weeds out.

This called for a whole new set of before photos.

On the way: a pause for epimidium appreciation

On the way: a pause for epimidium appreciation

Actinidia polygama on the shed

Actinidia polygama on the shed

before, east bed

before, east bed

the scrimmy little horsetail is popping up, along with new lilies

the scrimmy little horsetail is popping up, along with new lilies

from inside the weedy east bed, with Allan mowing the lawn

from inside the weedy east bed, with Allan mowing the lawn

I started with the area above because it is a hellish spot.  Once upon a time, in a budgetary crunch (because I was trying to put all extra money to getting our new house paid off…and I succeeded), I added some free horse manure to this area.  It began as a “clean” debris pile of autumn clean up garden clippings on top of newspaper, and I swore I would not let the bad aster or Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ get in there.  Now I have an area with a very nasty grass from the manure AND with Bad Aster and Lucifer!

four hours later

four hours later

Allan had weeded the raspberry row under the clothesline.

Allan had weeded the raspberry row under the clothesline.

Oh! And another thing I did:  See the purple leaved honeysuckle climbing the clothesline poles at both ends?  I had suddenly had a brainstorm when looking out my bedroom window in the morning that it is a great view blocker, so I dug up some rooted pieces and planted them along the east and west side fence where I want to block less than stellar views.

After weeding, I had a look round the bogsy wood garden for plants from Todd and found some that are emerging.

a pulsatilla

a pulsatilla

another "Todd Plant"

another “Todd Plant”

todd3

The wind had tilted the Bogsy Wood sign.

The wind, not Smokey, had tilted the Bogsy Wood sign.

As you can see, some areas are not as thick with weeds as others (thank goodness).

looking north from the bogsy wood garden

looking north from the bogsy wood garden

evening light on the garden boat

evening light on the garden boat

the best plant table

the best plant table

looking southwest: looks great if you can't see the weeds close up

looking southwest: looks great if you can’t see the weeds close up

Allan had put out his mother's ornamental pot, that we use as a water feature.

In Allan’s garden: Allan had put out his mother’s ornamental pot, that we use as a water feature.

6:15 PM (Allan's photo)

6:15 PM (Allan’s photo)

The weather called for one more good day on Sunday (good for weeding, not reading) and then a storm on Monday (please! so I can finish that excellent book!).

my blogging companions

Saturday, 11 April 2015

When Garden Tour Nancy texted me from the spring seminar near Astoria, I suddenly realized that I could ask her to guest blog!  I did not go for two reasons:  The first seminar is too early for me, and I urgently needed to weed my own garden.  I am not much for growing veg, as I keep filling every space with ornamentals (a few of which are also edible); that would have made the topics educational for me, had I gone.  By the time I asked her to guest blog, she was already in the “Growing Healthy Soils” lecture, so most of the photos were taken toward the end of the event.

Any comment that I could not resist interjecting is in [brackets and italics].

Master Gardener Spring Seminar

poster

fairground location

fairground location; That is the Columbia River separating Washington and Oregon.

food web

From the event description: “North Coast Food Web is teaming up with Clatsop County Master Gardeners for Spring Into Gardening this year, all in celebration of Food, Glorious Food! Growing workshops, cooking demos, food tastings, lots of vendors selling plants, gardening gear, books and more, plus we’re hosting Meet Your Farmer at Spring Into Gardening! Come out and meet over a dozen local farms, many of them selling plants and products, and find out how they grow and how you can buy from them.”

an overview, photo by David Reid from the Facebook event page

an overview, photo by David Reid from the Facebook event page

“Spring Into Gardening” by guest blogger Nancy Allen 

Spring into Gardening always has an all-day, complimentary buffet decorated with fresh flowers.

Prairie Fire crab apple

Prairie Fire crab apple

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buffet

buffet, with Gluten Free options

plant sale

Debbie Haughsten and Darlene Houser provided a cheerful welcome and advice to all at the plant sale..

Debbie Haugsten and Darlene Houser provided a cheerful welcome and advice to all at the plant sale.

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photo 3

Joanie Chapel's award-winning dahlia bulbs sold out quickly.

Joanie Chapel’s award-winning dahlia bulbs sold out quickly.

raffle

There were lots of great gifts for gardeners in this very popular large raffle.

Long-time Master Gardener of Astoria, Chris Bennett works at the Tongue Point raffle table.  The Peninsula's late Bob Caswell won this raffle twice in years past.

Long-time Master Gardener of Astoria, Chris Bennett works at the Tongue Point raffle table. The Peninsula’s late Bob Caswell won this raffle twice in years past.

[The winner of the Tongue Point raffle prize gets eight hours of gardening by the Job Corps students.  The thought occurred to me to go just to enter this; I could have unleashed the crew to clear out some of salmonberry in the bogsy woods!]

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[Above:  a donation from our neighbours, the owners of Starvation Alley Farm, purveyors of fine organic cranberry juice.]

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photo 5

 Vendors

The show features many  vendors:

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Why didn't I buy these lovely red coral bells?

Why didn’t I buy these lovely red coral bells?

Leo D Mock promoting his book titled Compost, By Any Other Name, Makes Good Dirt

Leo D Mock promoting his book titled Compost, By Any Other Name, Makes Good Dirt

Cute totes from grain bags

Cute totes from grain bags

Green Angel Gardens

Green Angel Gardens

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Garden furniture from Tongue Point

[The above photo is the one that Nancy texted to me, thus inspiring me to ask her to do a guest story.]

photo 4

Ilwaco’s Jim and Vera Karnofski’s Biocharm Farms

[For our tour of BioCharm farms, click here.]

photo 5

Washington State Master Gardeners had a booth and a very popular peony sale.  They have had over 700 peony sales this year!

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peonies

peonies

photo 3

Skamokawa Farmstead Creamery

Skamokawa Farmstead Creamery

Skamokawa Farmstead Creamery will be selling again at the Long Beach Farmers Market and also starting a program where visitors to the creamery can feed the baby goats!  And yes, I bought some of the garlic dill Chèvre.

Starvation Alley Cranberry Farm

Starvation Alley Farms

Starvation Alley Farms

Starvation Alley Farms

Starvation Alley Farms

Starvation Alley Farms

Food! Glorious Food! lecture

Two local farmers, Teresa Retzlaff and Kelly Huckestein described the most successful food to grow here on the North Coast.  First they presented a long list of vegetables and berries that are easy to grow here at the coast. Next a much shorter list of semi challenging foods to grow here. Finally a group of foods called Heartbreakers because they are so difficult to grow here. They recommend letting the farmers grow these for you. We’re talking tomatoes, peppers, and basil.  All of their PowerPoint slides will soon be available at the Clatsop County Master gardeners website.

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Food Demonstrations

Each demonstration was 15 minutes. The audience got to taste everything. First, Merianne Meyers cooked braised greens.  Next was asparagus with onion-lemon vinaigrette.

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As soon as I finished my generous helping of rhubarb cake, I had to dash back across the bridge to the peninsula.  I made it just in time for the lecture of the Cantankerous Farmer versus the Ilwaco Railway and Navigation Company given at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum by local historian Michael Lemeshko.  My full and entertaining day ended with a folk concert at the Peninsula Art Center, followed by dinner prepared by husband Phil.

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Shrimp scampi for two.

 It was delicious.

Grazie mille caro mio~!

Next day, in the garden: (Below) My garden art purchase, found at one of the vendor booths.  At one time it had eggs you could drop through the head.  Push the hen down, and an egg will pop out the front!

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Friday, 10 April 2015

Because the prediction of bad weather had become less dire by yesterday evening,  I was not entirely counting on a reading day.  We arose at the usual time and assessed the weather.  Just before breakfast, the various weather apps suggested rain would begin in 54 minutes.

I just could not relax because I knew how happy I would be to cross one more garden off the work list…and Mayor Mike’s is small and only a few blocks away.  When I told Allan that I did not want to drag him into a miserable weather experience. Even so, he agreed to give it a try.

Mike’s Garden

We were fortunate and got the fertilizer spread and worked in, and the garden and path weeded, and even weeds along the outside edge of the low outer wall removed, before the rain (which means the rain came about an hour later than predicted).

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden, looking south

The big red thing is an outdoor storage unit, due to home remodeling.

The big red thing is an outdoor storage unit, due to home remodeling.

one of Mike's lilacs

one of Mike’s lilacs

Pulmonaria (lungwort, spotted dog)

Pulmonaria (lungwort, spotted dog)

looking north from the front entry

looking north from the front entry

tree

Ilwaco Post Office garden

We went to get our mail. Even though a light rain had begun and the wind was kicking up, I surprised Allan by getting out of the van at the post office with a bucket of fertilizer.  I wanted so much to apply it and let the rain wash it in gently for the sake of not disturbing  assorted seeds I had planted.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Tulip 'Chinatown' (Allan's photo) (with white stripe on leaves)

Tulip ‘Chinatown’ (Allan’s photo) (with white stripe on leaves)

I’ve noticed that the tulip foliage looks much better this year than the last two springs when we had lots more rain and they got terribly splotched and battered.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo.  Thatis a lily that has gotten so tall under the "o".

Allan’s photo. That is a lily that has gotten so tall under the “o”.

While working at Mike’s, I’d had a brainstorm:  Garden Tour Nancy and I had a date to have lunch on Sunday.  But what if the weather was better on Sunday?  I don’t trust forecasts to be accurate, and I feel I should be weeding somewhere (perhaps my own garden) in workable weather.  I had texted her and she had agreed to have lunch instead today, so Allan drove me up to her house in Long Beach…after I had quickly changed into clothes that did not have the faint smell of Dr Earth fertilizer.

As we drove down Lake Street, the rain began in earnest.

As we drove down Lake Street, the rain began in earnest.

42nd Street Café

a nice warming pot of tea

a nice warming pot of English Breakfast tea

Much to my surprise, my birthday was not over!  Nancy brought me a bag of birthday gifts.

bag

They included a most excellent book about books, Book Lust by Nancy Pearl, and an Annie’s Annuals catalog from which I was instructed to choose 6 plants, one for each decade.  (More on this later.)  And some eggs from Nancy’s flock of hens; I wish that heavy rain had not prevented me from getting some photos of them and the garden before lunch.

eggs

eggs

We split an order of beignets, “New Orleans famed fritters, with a hint of spice, doused in powdered sugar”.

My friend J9, who lived in New Orleans for a decade, agrees that these are quite good.

My friend J9, who lived in New Orleans for a decade, agrees that these are quite good.

We each chose the same entreé, the Russian vegetarian scramble.

with red potatoes, fresh dill, mushrooms, and green onions

with red potatoes, fresh dill, mushrooms, and green onions

After a good long talk and being the last people in the restaurant at luncheon closing time, Nancy drove me home and I had at last an afternoon to finish the novel I’ve been reading.

From no puddle to this much had happened while I was gone.

From no puddle to this much had happened while I was gone.

The wind got to over 30 mph in the late afternoon.

The wind got to over 30 mph in the late afternoon.

Erasing Mike’s garden from the fertilizing list was a moment that made having gone out to work worthwhile.

getting shorter...for now.

getting shorter…for now.

Next week, we will be focused on getting Long Beach town and the Port of Ilwaco ready for the Razor Clam Festival.

razor

Not only does Long Beach abound with events, but the Ilwaco Saturday Market will be in session for that one Saturday  (with their weekly schedule beginning on May 2) so we will have many garden areas to fluff up.

satmarket

reading time at last

First, I perused the Annie’s Annuals catalog and picked out my six plants (perennials rather than annuals) from Nancy:

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 I chose Penstemon palmeri, Penstemon ‘Stapleford Gem’,  Dianthus ‘Thea Marie’,  Fuchsia ‘Mrs McDowell’,  Salvia patens ‘Cabrillo Giant’,  Eccremocarpus scaber ‘Pink Lemonade’, and two alternates in case any of those are sold out:  Erioganum grande var rubescens ‘Red Buckwheat’,  Fuchsia ‘Galfrey Lye’.

Then on to the last third of my book:

Funny Girl by Nick Hornby

I’m predisposed to like fiction or non-fiction by this author, one of my favourites.  I especially love his non- fiction about books and music, and his novel High Fidelity is one of my  favourite modern novels (and the movie made from it is wonderful).

All the cats were pleased with my afternoon off.

cats

Calvin

Frosty's tail does not a book marker make.

Frosty’s tail does not a book marker make.

Three take away passages from the novel about the creation of a 1960s English telly sitcom:

How to have a good relationship:

In a restaurant catering to entertainment industry luminaries, a writer for the sitcom says to his wife that other patrons are thinking,  “Who let them in?  They’re not beautiful or famous.”  She says, “Thanks,”….

tony

Later, on the subject of old age, a subject that has always been of interest to me because of my closeness to my grandmother and her friends, and one that is getting even more interesting the older I get:

It was absurd that they were getting old.  Absurd and wrong.  Old people had black and white memories of wars, music halls, wrteched diseases, candlelight.  Her memories were in colour and they involved loud music and discos, Biba and Habitat….”

It was a different world they lived in now, [she] caught herself thinking, and then she told herself off.  Of course it was a different world.  Don’t be so banal.  Obviously 1980 was different from 1930, 1965 was different from 1915, and so on.  Oh, but dear God….to a twenty-two-year-old now, 1965 was like 1915 had been to her when she was starting out.  It wasn’t like that, though, was it?  She saw pictures of The Beatles and Twiggy everywhere.  Nobody had wanted to think about 1915 in the 1960s, had they?  And then she remembered the Lord Kitchener posters that used to be everywhere.  It was all so confusing.”

I am hoping for a reading day tomorrow and an at home gardening day on Sunday.

Thursday, 9 April 2015

Diane’s Garden

Our first job of the day was to apply Dr. Earth fertilizer to Diane’s roadside garden (and to add a couple of pink and purple Agastaches).

I had gotten Diane’s permission to cut down some old stumps by the house wall and plant some perennials along there.

Allan did the chainsawing (Before, Allan's photo)

Allan did the chainsawing (Before, Allan’s photo)

after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

back porch planters, deadheaded

back yard planters, deadheaded

by the back steps

by the back steps

Tulip 'Chinatown'

Tulip ‘Chinatown’

The Red Barn

We had parked next door at the Red Barn Arena as it is too hard to turn our rig around in Diane and Larry’s parking lot.  (She’s a champion barrel racer and has a big horse trailer!)

I was inspired to pop two Gaura ‘So White’ into the planters by the Red Barn entry drive.

the luscious inside of tulips in the entry planters (with Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve')

the luscious inside of tulips in the entry planters (with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’)

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The tulip, 'Peppermint Stick', is red and white on the outside.

The tulip, ‘Peppermint Stick’, is red and white on the outside.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Basket Case Greenhouse

We made what lately seems to be our usual daily stop at The Basket Case to pick up the rest of my nicotianas and to stock up on a few plants for the Ilwaco planters.  Two or three Ilwaco planters that have been almost hidden against a couple of businesses are supposed to be moved to where they show better.  I want to be poised to add some hardy plants to them when they appear in their new locations.

a member of Basket Case staff (Allan's photo)

a member of Basket Case staff (Allan’s photo)

hanging basket being purchased

hanging basket being purchased

Owner Fred advises it is still too early to hang baskets outside and have them thrive.

A chicken was on the loose from the neighbour’s coop.  Such a lovely chicken, I will even use our one blurry photo:

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Shelly of Flowering Hedges stopped by and we had a quick natter about the joys of gardening for a living.

Shelly of Flowering Hedges stopped by and we had a quick natter about the joys of gardening for a living.

We both enjoy it very much, whatever our expressions might say!  (Shelly used to be co-owner of the beloved and much missed Pelicano Restaurant in Ilwaco; her spouse Jeff McMahon was the talented chef.)

Andersen’s RV Park

Allan and I spent the rest of the afternoon at Andersen’s RV Park.  I spread the Dr. Earth fertilizer around everywhere except the rugosa rose areas (they are vigorous enough!) and where I had planted poppy seeds.  The sweet peas are coming up. Take my word for it; they are just the tiniest green threadlike sprouts, barely breaking ground.

Allan finally had time to remove a nasty patch of the bad aster at the south end of the picket fence garden.  Below, the bucket is by the area he cleared.

Allan's photo with some lilies.

Allan’s photo with some lilies.

Allan's photo, during, with his tools of choice.

Allan’s photo, during, with his tools of choice.

after

after (Allan’s photo)

The Bad Aster will not be allowed to return here as long as we have this job!  (Allan's photo)

The Bad Aster will not be allowed to return here as long as we have this job! (Allan’s photo)

I planted a few of last year’s sweet pea seeds along that stretch of fence.  I want to see if they will germinate.

Allan also weeded one of the raised beds at the south end of the house.

before, Allan's photo

before, Allan’s photo

after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

I weeded out a patch of bad aster mixed with white phlox, of which there was way too much of a good thing, at the north end.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

picket fence bed, after

picket fence bed, after

my project after lots of hard work with the heavy pick

my project after lots of hard work with the heavy pick, and the last of the mulch pile

Allan did some weeding in the Payson Hall clubhouse planters while I raked in fertilizer in all the rest of the beds.  (He also weeded by the clam cleaning room; the park was full of people here for spring break and clamming.)

Payson Hall planters (Allan's photo); Lorna likes lots of annuals for summer colour so they are before their seasonal prime.

Payson Hall planters (Allan’s photo); Lorna likes lots of annuals for summer colour so they are before their seasonal prime.

Payson Hall anemones, Allan's photo

Payson Hall anemones, Allan’s photo

ranunculus, Allan's photo

ranunculus, Allan’s photo

California poppy, and an Allium emerging (Allan's photo)

California poppy, and an Allium emerging (Allan’s photo)

Zillions of poppies have reseeded.  They will have to make way for some annual plants later.  I see a nasturtium! (Allan's photo)

Zillions of poppies have reseeded. They will have to make way for some annual plants later. I see a nasturtium! (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo, anemones

Allan’s photo, anemones

narcissi on the outside of the picket fence, still going strong

narcissi on the outside of the picket fence, still going strong

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Long Beach

Because we had acquired some plants for the Fish Alley planters in Long Beach, I wanted to get them planted rather than have to unload and reload them into the van some other day.  We bypassed the Cove Restaurant and got down to Long Beach town at about six.  We added soil and then Gaura ‘So White’, some variegated thyme, and some “hens and chickens” sempervivum which I deeply hope will not get stolen.  They seem to tempt finger blight in the extreme.  These planters are planned for drought tolerance as they must be bucket watered.

Allan bucket watering the new plants.

Allan bucket watering the new plants.

Fish Alley

Fish Alley

long shadows of evening

long shadows of evening

On the way out of the alley, I noticed some gorgeous variegated Euphorbias in the planters of the townhouses next door.

a line of planters with Euphorbias

a line of planters with Euphorbias

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I was thinking how much I would like to find some of these for me, when I noticed a big hole in the planter closest to the street.  Some wastrel had stolen one of the beautiful plants.

finger blight!!!

finger blight!!!

The thief left a hole where the plant had been.

The thief left a hole where the plant had been.

I felt much sympathy for whoever had sought and planted these lovely plants and I hope the toxic euphorbia sap gives the thief a big blister.  Allan said “They took it to go with our hens and chicks that went missing from Fish Alley.”  We left to drive back north to the Cove.

City Hall garden, right around the corner

City Hall garden, right around the corner

The Cove Restaurant

A bit before seven, we arrived at the Cove for our Thursday tradition.

The Cove at Peninsula Golf Course

The Cove at Peninsula Golf Course

Owner Sondra had found time to trim her sword ferns!

Owner Sondra had found time to trim her sword ferns!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Is a “Chef’s Mercy Menu” a thing in the UK or Australia?  Here it means a changing menu depending on the chef’s whim, unlike the standard unchanging menu of the weekends.

behind the bar

behind the bar

You can see how fast and hard the staff was working.  That’s Chef Jason at the pass.  The servers were a flurry of motion behind the scenes but as soon as they entered the dining area they glided with serenity and grace.

delicious ahi tuna, accompanies by $2 each yummy fish tacos (not pictured)

delicious ahi tuna, accompanies by $2 each yummy fish tacos (not pictured)

Our (telephoto) view while dining:

Late evening golfers and dogs

Late evening golfers and dogs (Allan’s photo)

a little fluffball (Allan's photo)

a little fluffball (Allan’s photo)

One dog went swimming in the water hazard! (Allan's photo)

One dog went swimming in the water hazard! (Allan’s photo)

Some bird art from the Cove:

Only the ladies get to see this one...It's in the loo.

Only the ladies get to see this one…It’s in the loo.

hallway screen

hallway screen

and another

and another

At home, I am erasing fertilizing jobs from the work board faster than I’m adding them:

The nightmare of weeding the beach approach still looms.

The nightmare of weeding the beach approach still looms.  Added Mayor Mike and the Port to the fertilizing list.

Earlier today at Andersen’s RV Park, one of the staff mentioned that the Razor Clam Festival is next weekend (the 18th).  Allan said to me that we must get Long Beach ready in time….as if that was news.  I asked him if he had looked at the monthly calendar recently, which is below the work board.

the calendar

the calendar

The festival will take place in Fifth Street Park and Veterans Field, and has been marked in red.  It is also why we prioritized weeding the parking lot gardens recently, as many people will park by them.

razor

Wednesday, 8 April 2015

Ilwaco

We had an ambitious agenda today, starting with deadheading some narcissi that I noticed during yesterday evening’s drive by of the Howerton Way gardens. (I simply had no energy then to get out of the vehicle and pick off the dead flower stems).

By the Loading Dock Village building, I found room in the garden for three Agastaches (hyssops), which I hope will do well with minimal watering.  In his excellent book High and Dry, Robert Nold warned that they need more water than most people think, so this is a test of their endurance. 

three hyssops added

three hyssops added

I do wish we could just weed all along the port this week.  I saw little creeping sorrels coming back, and pulled some.  However, fertilizing elsewhere must take a priority as a good rainy (reading! I hope!) day is due on Friday and would nicely wash it all in.

same bed: Blue Ceanothus, blue sky

same bed: Blue Ceanothus, blue sky

same garden bed: narcissi

same garden bed: narcissi

Further west by the Ilwaco Pavilion and restrooms:  Oh how mildly infuriating to see all the ‘Baby Moon’ narcissi blooming now, when in other years I have always been able to count on them being in bloom for the parade on the first Saturday in May.

my favourite of all the Howerton Way garden beds

my favourite of all the Howerton Way garden beds

Narcissus 'Baby Moon' and santolinas

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ and santolinas, dianthus, etc

I will be curious to see what IS in bloom for parade weekend in Ilwaco and Long Beach!  One glimmer of hope is that this California poppy was already flowering in this same little garden:

California poppy (probably 'White Linen')

California poppy (probably ‘White Linen’)

reseeded from last year

reseeded from last year

If the ones reseeded from last year start to bloom this early, and the ones I sowed this year come on later, we should have a long lasting poppy show.

I long for a day to weed the boatyard; I will fertilize lightly as we go, when that happy day arrives, to work it in well so loose dogs don’t dig in it (or not too much, one hopes).

We drove by with no time to weed.  This cute boat caught my eye enough to get her photo taken out the van window.

We drove by with no time to weed. This cute boat caught my eye enough to get her photo taken out the van window.

At the post office, I got an exciting small box from Bluestone Perennials so we paused at home so I could free the plants.

plants

plants

photos from Bluestone Perennials....wowie zowie, eh?

photos from Bluestone Perennials….wowie zowie, eh?

And Sambucus 'Lemony Lace', makes my mouth water.

And Sambucus ‘Lemony Lace’, makes my mouth water.

In the garden, I took one photo before we headed back to our work day.

a deep red primula given to me by Jayne of Bailey's Café in Nahcotta.

a deep red primula given to me by Jayne of Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta.

The Depot Restaurant

The day’s fertilizing began at The Depot Restaurant in Seaview.

Depot garden with some narcissi and tulips

Depot garden with some narcissi and tulips

I wish we had time today to severely edit the ajuga.  Soon its day of doom will come. 

Ajuga (bugleweed) creeping forward from the back...

Ajuga (bugleweed) creeping forward from the back…

and backward from the front...

and backward from the front…

On the way to run two nursery errands, we paused long enough to photograph the tulips at the welcome sign.

welcome

back

The Planter Box

We needed to buy several more bags of Dr. Earth fertilizer.

Limonium Suworowii, for sale as you walk in.

Limonium Suworowii, for sale as you walk in.

rose

The Basket Case

After planting three Agastaches at the port, I had gotten anxious about running out of them, so back we went to The Basket Case to snag some and some more Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfly’ and ‘So White’.

more, more more!

more, more more! (Allan’s photo)

Fred totals up.

Fred totals up.  (Allan’s photo)

Now we could get back to fertilizing.  Because we had skipped Klipsan Beach Cottages yesterday, we headed there.  I am trying a new plan, just getting through as many gardens as possible without getting anxious about how far along we are.  It worked yesterday….sort of….

Klipsan Beach Cottages

At KBC, owner/manager Mary helped rake the fertilizer in, and that helped speed things along.  Allan and I did some weeding and deadheading and then took some photos for the KBC Facebook page (which I help run, along with many more).

boxwood and Euphorbia

boxwood and Euphorbia

Clematis (Allan's photo)

Clematis (Allan’s photo)

Clematis on a deer fence gate (Allan's photo)

Clematis over a deer fence gate (Allan’s photo)

In the fenced garden, two pots of Angelique tulips

In the fenced garden, two pots of Angelique tulips

In the fenced garden, Tulip 'Angelique'

Tulip ‘Angelique’

Tulip 'Formosa'

Tulip ‘Formosa’

multi flowering tulip 'Florette'

multi flowering tulip ‘Florette’

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

a tulip which has come back in the ground for over five years now

a tulip which has come back in the ground for over five years now

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)  (taken without each other’s knowledge)

one of two yellow tree peonies

one of two yellow tree peonies

tree peony flowers

tree peony flowers

I was thrilled that this year I was there during their bloom time!

I was thrilled that this year I was there during their bloom time!

Pieris by the lawn garden

Pieris by the lawn garden

more Clematis (Allan's photo)

more Clematis (Allan’s photo)

detail (Allan's photo)

detail (Allan’s photo)

Joseph's Coat rose (Allan's photo)

Joseph’s Coat rose (Allan’s photo)

shadows by the A Frame woods

shadows by the A Frame woods

Narcissi in the A Frame garden (Allan's photo)

Narcissi in the A Frame garden (Allan’s photo)

cool plant from Mary's brother (Allan's photo)

cool plant from Mary’s brother (Allan’s photo)

One of Mary’s brothers lives near Heronswood and is quite the plantsman.  He’s the one who gave her the yellow tree peonies and also the Cardiocrinum giganteum that bloomed last year, a choice plant with which his own garden abounds.

the garden below the house deck

the garden below the house deck

As we left, I lazily asked Allan to photograph two things that I spotted from the vehicle’s passenger seat:

a container planting by Mary by the office door (Allan's photo)

a container planting by Mary by the office door (Allan’s photo)

Easter decor

Easter decor

a narcissi with a darling tiny cup

a narcissi with a darling tiny cup

The smaller the cup, the more I like them.

The smaller the cup, the more I like them.

Anchorage Cottages

I had brought four window box inserts to see if they would fit.  They are too short to fill the length of the windowbox frames.

not gonna work

not gonna work

Manager Beth said she would order more of the kind that the bulbs are planted in.  Two of those in each frame fill up the whole length.  The bulb ones are sort of narrow which is why I was hoping the terracotta ones would work.  Oh well.  So…we fertilized and I planted Agastaches and Nicotiana langsdorfii.

My good friend Mitzu was there.

My good friend Mitzu was there.

m2

m3

m4

trying a new thing: Agastaches added to containers.  I think they will bloom most of the summer.

trying a new thing: Agastaches added to containers. I think they will bloom most of the summer.

Across the street: a classic scene of beach clothes drying in the sun on a white picket fence:

fence

Boreas Inn

Allan was tormented when we drove up to the Boreas Inn’s west gardens to see Susie’s whirligig garden sculpture madly twirling.  He had bought himself one at a close out sale at Fred Meyer and his has never agreed to spin despite tinkering and oiling.

(Allan's photo)

Susie’s taunted him by whirling rapidly in very little wind. (Allan’s photo)

We fertilized and planted some Agastaches and some Nicotiana langsdorfii.  On the future work list is the task of  edging the lawn beds.

looking west

looking west

some stray narcissi in the long grass

some stray narcissi in the long grass

Long Beach

We had eight plants to plant in Long Beach:

two Champion hebes by the little monument in Coulter Park

two Champion hebes by the little monument in Coulter Park

three nicotianas at City Hall, where the red rhodo has popped into bloom overnight.

three nicotianas at City Hall, where the red rhodo has popped into bloom overnight.

City Hall

City Hall

City Hall...I love the foliage of the Aruncus (goatsbeard); I rescued this one from our old road when it was widened, years ago.

City Hall…I love the foliage of the Aruncus (goatsbeard); I rescued this one from our old road when it was widened, years ago.

and three nicotiana in Fifth Street Park, where I am determined to have them even though it was hard to squeeze them in.

and three nicotiana in Fifth Street Park, where I am determined to have them even though it was hard to squeeze them in.

home again

I managed to cast fertilizer around the front garden, and get magnesium sulfate on the roses front and back.  (The deer are still coming in and nibbling the front garden roses, hopping the low fence.)

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

I was quite excited to find, inside the front fence, a runner from the Tetrapanax!

(Allan's photo)  It's next to Melianthus major.  I may be sorry later but for now I love that the Tetrapanax 'Steroidal Giant' is spreading.

(Allan’s photo) It’s to the left, next to Melianthus major. I may be sorry later but for now I love that the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’ is spreading.

I did not have time to work the fertilizer in and only looked at the weeds.  It will get worked in by rain and later by me when I can finally have some weeding days at home.

Tomorrow: If we can spend most of the day at Andersen’s and get its gardens fertilized and weeded, I will feel we have put in a very good six days of work.

three jobs erased, and a couple added

three jobs erased, and a couple added

Further accomplishment:  We finished watching the latest season of Doctor Who tonight and will be able to return it to the library on time.

 

 

 

Tuesday, 7 April 2015

Leaving home…the front garden looked ever so enticing.

over the front gate

over the front gate

home tulips

I would love to spend the day weeding here, but work calls instead.

Last year, we did not fertilize any of the gardens, except for the fertilizer that we add to each and every new plant while planting.  I had fallen for the idea that if one mulches, one does not need to fertilize.  (This month, well after making the decision to fertilize more, I read a theory that gardens need more fertilizer if one mulches!) By the end of last summer, I felt that most of the gardens were not quite as good as they could have been had we applied Dr. Earth in spring.  So today we began the fertilizing round of almost all the clients.  Casa Pacifica won’t get fertilized because I believe it would inspire the dogs to dig in the garden, and I’ll have to have a serious talk with my good friend Coco the spaniel at Jo’s garden.

.Speaking of dogs, our first errand today was a stop at our accountant’s office where we had the pleasure of visiting Helen.

Helen, Jennifer's dog

Helen, Jennifer’s dog

In Jennifer's accounting office

In Jennifer’s accounting office

I have become quite irritated with my new (fortunately inexpensive) Olympus pocketcam, and have asked Allan to find me a camera like Spot, the Canon Powershot whose lens got scratched.  By the end of the day, every photo taken by the Olympus had to be fixed, and all the indoor photos are a lot or a little out of focus.  It is often tempting to acquire a really nice SLR camera, a digital version of the sort of camera I used to use in the days of film.  However, for work I really need a plain old reliable pocket cam.  My favourite of all the ones I have used was the Lumix and yet it was so delicate that three of them in a row had mechanical failures (System Error Zoom) so I need one that is tough enough to handle the gardening life.

Before we could begin the fertilizing, we needed to stop at

The Basket Case Greenhouse

to refresh our supply of Agastache (hyssops), one of my favourite perennials, and to pick up quantities of my beloved Nicotiana langsdorfii.

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii blooms all summer and the chartreuse goes with everything.

Fred had a new gnome for sale.

Fred had a new gnome for sale.

a new hen and chicks, too

a new hen and chicks, too

There are still some Jade Frost Eryngiums.

There are still some Jade Frost Eryngiums.

The annuals house. It is still too early to plant most annuals. (Allan’s photo)

 

 Marilyn’s garden in Surfside

We decided to start at our northernmost garden and work our way south.  My first thought was just to fertilize, plant some hyssops, and hightail it on to the next job.  Then I recalled that we had an almost empty wheelie bin which goes out Thursday morning.  I would not have time to fill it with my own weeds, so why not Marilyn’s?  So we spent an hour or more weeding, as well.

Marilyn's, looking south

Marilyn’s, looking south

Narcissi by the front porch

Narcissi by the front porch

midway along the garden path

midway along the garden path

looking north from the end of the path

looking north from the end of the path

more narcissi

more narcissi

an experiment: would the deer who live in this garden eat Dutch Iris?  Apparently not!

an experiment: would the deer who live in this garden eat Dutch Iris? Apparently not!

Applied a whole bag of this

Applied a whole bag of this

Meanwhile, Allan weeded and hacked out salal around the rhododendrons on the east side of the driveway.

During: Allan's photo

During: Allan’s photo (showing neighbour’s house)

and after, Allan's photo

and after, Allan’s photo

That area got this kind of fertlilizer

That area got this kind of fertlilizer

We are big fans of Dr Earth and consider it the very best fertilizer to use.

Oman Builders Supply Garden

Next we fertilized and added two Agastaches (‘Cotton Candy’ and ‘Summer Glow’ hyssops) to the little entry garden at Oman Builders Supply in Ocean Park.

OBS garden

OBS garden

This is just one amazingly huge Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

This is just one amazingly huge Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The Erysimum is getting old and woody inside but I should get one more season before it needs replacing.

The Erysimum is getting old and woody inside but I should get one more season before it needs replacing.

That is also one enormous hebe!

That is also one enormous hebe!

at the south end of the garden

at the south end of the garden

Next in the order of gardens going north to south would have been Klipsan Beach Cottages.  We skipped  ahead to Golden Sands because it was almost 3 PM by now and we did not want to be rushed at either job.  I am trying to be calm about how much we get done in a day instead of working in anxiety.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

The four courtyard quadrants, after mulching, and after today adding Dr Earth, should be taking off pretty soon.  So far, they still look a tad bit dull.  They each got a Nicotiana and an Agastache.  We fertilized and also applied magnesium sulfate to the roses.  The experts at Heirloom Roses say:

  • Magnesium (Mg): Crucial nutrient that promotes dark green leaves, intensified flower color, increased flower production, and can also help flush harmful salts through the soil. That’s why Epsom Salts (a form of Magnesium Sulfate) is a time-honored secret for rose gardeners. Apply at the rate of 1/3 to 1/2 cup per plant at the beginning of the growing season. 
SW quadrant

SW quadrant

NW quadrant

NW quadrant

NE ("mom's") quadrant

NE (“mom’s”) quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

Allan's photo of a tulip in that quadrant

Allan’s photo of a tulip in that quadrant

We were thrilled today that a volunteer had done an elegant pruning job of the two trees at the north end of the courtyard.

Now you can see through from the dining room to the gardens.

Now you can see through from the dining room to the gardens.

looking west from the dining room doors

Before: looking south from the dining room doors, the view had been heavily blocked.

looking north from the south end of the courtyard at the trees

before: looking north from the south end of the courtyard at the trees over a year ago

after pruning: so much better!

today after pruning: so much better!

Whoever did the pruning, thank you so much, because it is exactly what I wanted done.  The other solution would have been to remove the trees altogether.  I have felt for years that the residents need to catch a glimpse of colour in the garden to convince them to spend more time walking the courtyard path.

The garden is still so dull compared to mine, mainly because I try to keep the budget low and so I don’t buy quantities of tulips.  I have some Hellebore starts to plant soon, donated by Kathleen Shaw, and those should help by early next spring.

Since there is still not much going on outside, I photographed some of the darling sit spots on the inside of the building.  You may recall how the building completely enclosed the garden.

Golden Sands Assisted Living.  The courtyard shows so well on Google earth.

Golden Sands Assisted Living. The courtyard shows so well on Google earth.

The south end of the building has a seating area with a view of the garden.

south end sit spot

south end sit spot

The aunt of Phil, Garden Tour Nancy’s spouse, used to host a cocktail hour here once a week. Her name was Betty Robert, née Beal.  Her nickname was Betty Boop.  I wonder if that tradition goes on now that she has passed.

Betty standing next to her older sister, Eva, Phil's mom

Betty standing next to her older sister, Eva, Phil’s mom

the cocktail bar

the cocktail bar

The two long corridors have residential rooms on both sides, with an indentation halfway along for a nice cozy nook.

the west hallway's seating nook

the west hallway’s seating nook

another sit spot, by the northwest corner of the building

another sit spot, by the northwest corner of the building

the large common telly watching area

the large common telly watching area

I was pleased that Fox (Faux) News was NOT the news on the telly screen, and that as I took this photo a newscaster was saying in a positive tone that an anti discrimination act would “protect the rights of LGBT people”.  Yes!  My heart was warmed, as I never thought in my youth that I would live to see such glorious times.

On the north corridor is a library room which very faintly reminds me of the jigsaw puzzle room at the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

the library

the library

I’ve often thought I’d be happy here if I ever needed to go into assisted living.

Long Beach

We did not have time for any more big jobs, so I proposed that we plant a few plants in three different areas in Long Beach.  When we unloaded six plants at Veterans Field, I revised the plan to wait till tomorrow for the other spots.  A chilly wind made the work a touch unpleasant.

Allan planting in Veterans Field, which got three Dianthus 'Raspberry Swirls' and two more Salvia 'May Night'.

Allan planting in Veterans Field, which got three Dianthus ‘Raspberry Swirls’ and two more Salvia ‘May Night’.

Ilwaco

The final, small, bearable task was to add a few more plants to the planters at Ilwaco city hall.

at Ilwaco city hall

at Ilwaco city hall: added variegated lemon thyme, Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ and lavender

Decided to put a ‘Blueberry Ruffles’ lavender as the centerpiece instead of last year’s choice of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  The lavenders will be more drought tolerant and will not need deadheading.  I will probably start to miss the ‘Butterfly’ by midsummer.

at home

I was able to erase 3 fertilizing jobs from the work board!

I was able to erase 3 fertilizing jobs from the work board!

Just as I settled in to work on this post, Allan said “There is a really bright rainbow!”  He went out to take photos.  I went to the porch and was thoroughly gobsmacked by the beauty and thought of how neither of my cameras is satisfactory.  Then I remembered the iPhone!  So here are our photos, Allan’s with his Sony pocketcam and me with the iPhone 6.

my photos:

rainbow

You can see Allan, through the arch, taking his photos.

You can see Allan, through the arch, taking his photos.

rainbow

rainbow2

light on the bogsy woods

light on the bogsy woods

rainbow4

I had hurried over to Nora's back yard to get this view.  By now it was pouring torrential rain.

I had hurried over to Nora’s back yard to get this view. By now it was pouring torrential rain.

note the rain in the water box, lower left

note the rain in the water box, lower left

Torrents poured into all the rain barrels.

Torrents poured into all the rain barrels.

I should have thought of taking a panorama with the iPhone but I forgot about that possiblity.  The rainbows were huge.

Allan’s photos:

DSC00242

DSC00243

DSC00244

DSC00246

DSC00247

DSC00248

DSC00249

pink tree two lots to the east

pink tree two lots to the east

DSC00251

DSC00253

the former danger tree

the former danger tree

DSC00255

DSC00256

DSC00258

heavy rain

heavy rain

sunset

sunset

looking west down Lake Street

looking west down Lake Street

After all that excitement, and getting thoroughly drenched, and finishing this blog post, we will now return to our binge watching of the latest season of Doctor Who (which I am liking very much).  It is looking promising to get it back to the library before it becomes overdue.

Monday, 6 April 2015

Long Beach

Back we went to our third day at the Long Beach parking lot gardens, where yesterday we had left the south of the three long narrow beds unfinished.  First, we picked up our check at Long Beach city hall.

Long Beach City Hall with red rhododendron about to bloom

Long Beach City Hall with red rhododendron about to bloom

City Hall narcissi

City Hall narcissi

west side city hall

west side city hall

And then….the south parking lot berm, which we were determined to finish today, making today’s story pretty much similar to yesterday’s.  Fortunately, I enjoy most weeding unless it is in a difficult windy garden (like the Bolstadt beach approach garden which is hanging over our heads like the axe of doom).  Or unless I am dealing with a truly mean and tough weed like couch grass or bindweed or blackberry.

berms

bottom of photo, the three parking lot garden strips

before

before

before

before

after

after

the area that I just cleared a spot for pavers yesterday

before: the area that I just cleared a spot for pavers yesterday still needed more weeding

after

after

after

after

before

before, with Stipa gigantea ornamental grass

before

before

before: the south end

before: the south end

I considered leaving the cute quaking oat grass…and did not.

quaking oat grass with kniphofia from my mom's old garden

quaking oat grass with kniphofia from my mom’s old garden

To the east of where we were working sits this house:

house

I always remember the garden that used to be there, shown in this photo that I took in 1991.

same house, 1991, with garden and blue bottle tree

same house, 1991, with garden and blue bottle tree

We weeded for five hours straight, running into a really nasty area of couch (AKA quack) grass with long nasty white roots. I did a little research tonight and learned that in the UK it is called “twitch grass”; this finally explains to me why my Grandma called it “witch grass”.

From RHS UK: “The network of rhizomes become entangled in clumps of herbaceous perennials and among shrubs and fruit bushes causing great problems, as they are difficult to remove. Couch can easily spread from infested lawns into adjacent borders.

Couch is usually spread from garden to garden unwittingly when small sections of rhizomes become hidden among the roots of plants or in manures or soil.”

I learned that its botanical name is Elymus repens , so it is related to the beautifully ornamental, but also perniciously running, Elymus arenarius (Blue Lyme Grass).

The grass roots go deep and every tiny piece missed will start new plants.

The grass roots go deep and every tiny piece missed will start new plants.

It turned into a three Ibuprofen day.  (I’d forgotten the Tylenol so could not try to two ibu and one tylenol combo that seems to work better.) When we were stuck into the couch grass area, Allan expressed concern that if we teased out every white root, we would not finish the job.  I was determined to at least try.  The bearded iris in the couch grass was so full of the bad roots that I dug it right out.

iris

weed roots in the iris

weed roots in the iris

It was easy peasy to pull the grass roots out from the iris making clean divided pieces to reset.

clean rhizomes

clean rhizomes

This should have been done last month…so I hope they perk up after replanting.

Allan found a huge dandelion hidden in full shade under one of the trees.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While walking back and forth to the Fifth Street restrooms one block to the west, we each took some photos of Summerhouse’s tulips.  This is a vacation rental house owned by our former client Erin, who now has Flowering Hedge gardeners working for her home garden.  I think Terran and Shelly might take over this little garden, too, as we have dropped it due to simply having to cut back.

Summerhouse

Summerhouse

the garden, where we planted mostly yellow tulips

the garden, where we planted mostly yellow tulips

summerhouse tulips

summerhouse tulips

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Darmera peltata in Fifth Street park

Darmera peltata in Fifth Street park

And now for some more afters…because we did get done!

after2

This is the only garden where I am fine with orange montbretia! It beats out the grass.

before

another paver area, before

during (Allan's photo)

during (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

after

after

after

after

after

after

after

after

The second to last after photo showed a lost Allan tool!

The second to last after photo showed a lost Allan tool!

the end!

the end!

We had found it necessary to pull some landscape fabric from next to the railroad ties …original to when the ties were put in place.  These photographs taken while dumping our debris shows why:

permeated with roots

permeated with roots

roots going right through it

roots going right through it

See our old post What Not to Do with Landscape Fabric for more thoughts on this.

At the city works yard, we have added considerably to the debris pile over the last three days.

pile

We were quite tired, and did not try to do even one more small thing after dumping our debris.

Ilwaco

At home, while I was writing this post, Allan exclaimed “The sky is really pink”, and hurried outside.  I followed and saw the spectacular sunset.  He took all the sunset photos to share with you…except the last one, as you will see.

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

DSC00222

DSC00223

DSC00226

DSC00229

Lake Street puddle

Lake Street puddle

sunset over Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant'

sunset over Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

I snagged this last photo from Susie Goldsmith:  Sunset tonight from the Boreas Inn in Long Beach.

susie

photo by Susie Goldsmith

 

 

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