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Posts Tagged ‘garden touring’

Wednesday, 4 July 2018

We continued our garden tour day with a relaxing late afternoon and evening at

The Bayside Garden.

Here is their map of their garden.  You can see this park-like collectors’ garden on July 21 when it is on the local garden tour; tickets available here.

rhododendron trio by the front door

The new boxes right along the property line are in the next door garden, which will also be on the tour.

John

the irrigation pond

After the earlier part of the day had been hot and muggy, we now had a cooling and quite pleasant rain.

There are many plants from Xera Plants in this garden, and Xera owner Paul Bonine got to see how they are faring at the coast.

John and Paul

Evan, Paul, and Ann

deer protection

Evan botanizing

Steve says “Bartlettina sordida (Dirty Thoroughwort or Blue Mist Flower) — Mexico native;  Rare in cultivation!”

This shiny little fellow is R. ‘Rwain’ (rhododendron without an important name)

Paul, Steve, Ann

R. sinogrande

Allan’s photo

R. rex ssp. fictolacteum

dogwood by the pond, close up

R. ‘Grandma’s Hat’

That’s Hydrangea ‘Lemon Daddy’

R. makinoi

my favourite: R. degronianum ssp yakushimanum x R. pachysanthum

newly planted area

Rhododendron ‘Cupcake’

other side of tidal stream

Acer platanoides ‘Rezak’

ladies in waiting

on the pump house roof

We repaired to the east side patio and sat.

our view

a gift from a friend

Ann and Paul

delicious morsels. The flower pot arrangement was also a gift from a friend.

martinis

Ann, Evan, and Paul were going to see the fireworks in Long Beach at dusk, and we had been touring for so long that they did not have time to go back to Ann’s family vacation house in Naselle (half an hour away).  Steve and John kindly rustled up a delicious pasta dinner to keep us all fortified.

photo by Ann Amato (Evan, John, Steve, Paul, me)

The end of a perfect day:

Steve’s photo: me, Allan, Evan (Plant Lust), Paul (Xera Plants), John (Bayside Garden), Ann (Spiffy Seeds/Cistus Nursery)

 

 

 

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Sunday, 24 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

We skipped the next garden, the garden of John Wott, because of this in the description (and because Alison had toured in not long before): “This garden is not ADA accessible and will require entrance via steep stone steps.” We would not have time to see all of the gardens anyway, and the one I wanted most to see was the last one, not this one….although it did sound excellent because “the plants were largely selected by Dan Hinkley.”  You can read about the garden here in the Outlaw Gardener’s blog post, which does show the steps (steep and uneven but with a railing).  I am sure the homeowner must have another way in…Does he really carry his groceries and furniture up those steps? And plants and soil? I do wonder.

We next visited two gardens right next door to each other, always an ideal situation that I have wanted, but time is short if there is any chance I might get it in this lifetime.

Kim’s garden

driveway

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

back garden

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

big metal boxes by back porch

Allan’s photo

Look, a refrigerator!

My wee summerhouse would be set up for couch reading also.

further along

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The garden is bigger on the inside than it looks on the outside.

the other side of the house

I’ve loved these big troughs ever since seeing them used in Eugene gardens in 2008.  A decade has passed and I still have not acquired any.  They are kind of pricey.  And yet I spent the equivalent amount on other things…

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the side garden; I like this very much.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We then walked along the sidewalk to the next door garden.

Ryan and Ahna’s garden

-ney included nandinas, heucheras, and euphorbias. Japanese blood grass, black-eyed Susan, and Concord barberry add pops of color.”

Allan’s photo

no railings

I went back out and in the lower gate.

shed with butterfly roof

By where we parked, I asked Allan to take a photo of this gate:

The garden I most wanted to see was the last one of the day; it was just eight blocks south and four blocks east of the house I grew up in (my parents’ house, not my grandma’s house).  However, Alison was concerned that her vehicle was overheating so we went back to the hotel instead.  Lesson learned: Like going to the Withey Price garden first on Sunday, always go to the one you most want to see first.  I used to walk so extensively and restlessly around the parental home’s surrounding blocks that I must have walked by the last house of the tour many times as a teenager.

Here is the description:

Fortunately, you and I can see it twice second hand on the Outlaw Gardener blog, right here and here.  This garden had so many of just the sort of thing I love that I think it would have taken first place as my favourite private garden, so be sure to tour it vicariously through Peter’s post.

I do not think I will go to Seattle again so I am grateful for the virtual tour.  What’s more, here is some history of their two gardens, before they lived together.

When we got back to the hotel after touring, Alison had decided to drive home later in the evening after her car cooled down.  I actually considered, despite traffic phobia, that Allan and I might have time to hop in our van and drive back to the last tour garden before it closed.  Phobia won, and we might not have made it in time anyway.

The idea of leaving for home and skipping the Monday tours was so tempting, but two things kept me there.  I wanted to attend the guided tour of the Anderson School gardens the next morning, tour at least two of the Puyallup open gardens, and I wanted to go to Old Goat Farm nursery on the way back home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 24 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Geometry in Motion Garden

approaching the garden

At the neighbours’, where a real estate open house was in session, lemonade was for sale under an umbrella.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

small lawn in front garden

bright front porch

front garden

burbler

many tour guests

In walking along the easy path on one side of the house, I was amused by the window wells.

approaching the back garden

the water feature and its reflections

at one end of the water feature

 

The pot of sarracenia floated freely in the water.

garden admiration

back porch

back wall of house

at the back of the garden

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I enjoyed the next set of window wells on the way out.

plants to enjoy from a basement room

more supplicating hands

a narrow, level path and dappled light

plants tucked in wherever possible

Now for some more exploration of the front garden, while most of the tour guests have gone to the back.

Before going to the next garden, I admired the house across the street:

I like the windows.

 

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Sunday, 24 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Jorgenson Garden

We now come to my favourite private garden of all those we toured on the  2018 Hardy Plant tour days.

Ah…just the sort of garden I like best.

treasures in the parking strip

rose and more next to the driveway

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

front steps

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

It was hard to get photos in the extremely bright afternoon sun, but trust me, the front slope was full of just the sort of plants I like.

Allan’s photo

happy me just stood here for awhile

If only I had one (or more) of each.

People were doting on the very aromatic Salvia clevelandii, smells so good

I finally left the sidewalk and went up the stairs to the front porch area…

And decided to go around the other way rather than go down these steps (which were not difficult, but still…)

I empathize with the man with a cane going down very carefully. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I had had some rude responses in other gardens when I politely bucked the flow to go the way that was easiest for me.  More on this in the post with which I will conclude this tour sequence!  Here, there were no problems as I entered the back garden by the “wrong way”.

hardy schefflera in the back garden

a small garden packed with fascination for me

packed with tour guests also

Allan’s photo

I was in a tizzy over this, a gomphrena, yes?, little bitty and I want it!!

Rambling Rosa banksiae way up a tree caused a sensation with tour guests.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Lady Banks rose is thornless. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photos; I totally missed this part.

soothing shady sit spot

Coming around the side of the house…I had been well aware all day that it was Pride Day in Seattle.  It would have been great to be able to be in two places at once and go to the big parade, which I had attended so many times in its early days.  It was good to see the flag in this garden.

with lilies in bud

looking back at the lawn

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

through the gate to the front garden

Allan’s photo

O how I wish I could grow eremerus at home…they seem to need more heat than I can provide…..or something.

Lobelia tupa

I have occasionally had success with this plant but never managed to get it through the winter.

a new batch of tour guests in for a treat

I like what I like and that garden is just what I like.  And I like to see small gardens; I tire quickly of grand estates.

See more at the Facebook page of Jorgensen’s garden design company.

 

 

 

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Sunday, 24 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Sandy and Sterling’s Garden, Seattle

That is Lake Washington in the distance.

See where that woman is casually standing? That spot was open to a drop-off and, to me with cane and brace, the gravel slope was slippery and unstable.  I would have put a railing along the house…for someone like me.  Afraid of slipping in a way that would make it hard to work next week, I retreated to the shade of the very front of the porch.  This little front courtyard (not accessible to tour-goers) had a shallow reflecting pool that was attracting much attention from others who had stepped onto the porch out of the hot sun.

The docent demonstrated how the panels, created by the owners’ son (as I remember) could be adjusted for different light.

Ten steps through the open door of the house was the deck with a view.  I have some thoughts about semi-disabled garden touring at this point, one being that two days of garden touring had been physically harder than two weeks of working.  More on this in my concluding post about this tour weekend.

The next garden was said to be two blocks away so I decided to walk there while Allan and Alison toured the back garden and deck.

Here is Allan’s walk through this garden:

This was no problem for normal people. (My words, not Allan’s)

back garden

Below were our seminar speakers from Ireland, June and Jimi Blake.

Jimi and the cool water.

and June.

returning to the front garden

a tour guest with a smart shade umbrella: onward!

 

 

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Saturday, 23 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Soul Garden, Edmonds

…flowering currants and lots of small Japanese maples to flow and weep over the boulders.  Hellebores bloom in winter, and rodgersia send up their plumes of pink flowers in springtime.  This garden was featured in Val Easton’s NW Living Column, April 10. 2015.

Allan’s photo

the front garden

entering the back garden

Allan’s photo

 

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the kitchen garden, above the little waterfalls

Allan’s photo

an easy path above the waterfall

looking down into the little stream

waterfall (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

the pond

Allan liked the hose reel firmly mounted to the house.

I loathe free standing hose reels; this looks much easier.

at the back of the garden

tour guests consider the labyrinth

testing

I mean no disrespect when I write that someone would find it hard going to get me to walk a labyrinth instead of either gardening or reading a book.  Maybe I should have tried it instead of lurking around the edges.  You can read more about the gardener’s philosophy of labyrinth walking here, beautifully described.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Fortunately for me, there was an easier path than this.

interlude

On the way to the next garden, Allan photographed this seemingly abandoned greenhouse.

I wonder what the story is here.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 22 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Hampton Garden, Redmond

going in

We were pleased to see more flowers bordering the large expanse of front lawn.

Allan’s photo

I recognized painted sage in the planter in front of the porch and went to have a closer look.  Like mine lately, it was not colouring up in a showy manner.

Salvia viridis (painted sage); I wonder if it will show more colour soon?

painted sage, not what it used to be; the bracts don’t seem to colour up as in days of yore.

rose garden by the front porch

lawn border

more metal alliums—I want some! Sign says Allium metallica.

Allan’s photo

Allium schubertii seedhead with water bottle for scale

Allan’s photo

burbler

looking across the lawn

flower beds at the end of the lawn

Allan’s photo

a gorgeous iris

I like flowers.  I prefer a garden with perennials and annuals mixed with shrubs, even though it is more maintenance.

This made me happy!

This made me envious.  (I can’t seem to grow delphiniums.) Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Behind the flower beds, a fenced kitchen garden:

further along the side garden, pots of dahlias

another angle on the handsome delphiniums

We thought this might be a clever upcycled…something…to keep the strawberries off the ground.

By the side porch of the house, we found the chicken topiary with eggs.

On the porch:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the catio

Allan’s photo

garden shed in the side yard, next to a chicken coop

I have that same set of chickens, and they fall over all the time.  These were wired into the ground to stay put.

real chooks

a rose petal snack

vigorously digging a hole

Allan’s photo

After the chicken coop came the shade garden.


a courtyard off to the side as one goes toward the back garden.

at the center of the paths

a perfect hosta

Allan’s photo

I looked beyond to find the work area, always of interest.

horse poop, I believe

how so perfect??

Behind the back garden was a barn and pastures.  One dark grey horse walked away from having its photo taken; another was being groomed.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

an enormous climbing hydrangea

behind the house

I love this cat sculpture.

more of the garden along the horse pastures

plates in a bike wheel

Coming around the house, another border featuring perfect hostas…

Allan’s photo

By looking hard, Allan found a few tiny holes in hosta leaves, just to make me feel less inferior.

Allan’s photo

the house from the hosta bed

perfect…how?

We had taken a long time touring this garden and admiring all the flowers and those perfect hostas.  We still had one more garden to tour today before the tour time ended.

 

 

 

 

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