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Archive for the ‘private gardens’ Category

Tuesday, 5 Sept 2017

The grim and hateful news that protection is in jeopardy for young Dreamers (children of undocumented immigrants, teenagers and young adults who grew up here, knowing no other country) cast a pall over the day even though it was expected.  We hope this gets sorted out in the next six months.  We are proud of our state of Washington, which is resisting this decision. As President Obama said today, “This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people — and who we want to be.”

Allan and I have already helped pay the rent, as did other concerned locals, for a local family with children, whose breadwinner (a well respected community-minded man with no criminal record) was arrested by immigration authorities, and we will continue to help in that way as much as we can.

Today we did the job routine that has become our Wednesday rounds, in order to get as much if not all work polished off before Rod Run Friday. I like to have that day free to mentally rev up for photographing the Slow Drag at the Port of Ilwaco.

ash on a spider web from wildfires way upriver (Allan’s photo)

The Depot Restaurant

the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

north side of Depot deck


Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’ and Eryngium

The Red Barn Arena

also the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

near the garden (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

The usual weeding and deadheading and a bit of supplemental watering….

I was pleased that the new planting from last week had made it through the heat. (Allan’s photo)


belly rub for Misty


a different angle on the garden

My good friend Misty.

These, or at least some of them, are going onto the new septic raised garden soon.  Even in this shady corner, they were rich with bees.


Holly was on the front porch (Allan’s photo)


roadside garden


Cosmos (‘Daydream’, maybe)

Long Beach intermission

We drove west again to Long Beach to buy a chrysanthemum at Dennis Company (Basket Case is closed Tuesdays), pick up our check, and make a bank deposit.

Yesterday, I photographed almost all of the Long Beach planters after the sun disappeared behind a smoke haze and a lot of flowers had closed up.  Today, I photographed this one to compare in bright light.

yesterday, flowers closed because of dim light


today


City Hall north side. Allan picked the yellow leaves off of the rhododendron.


Basket Case Greenhouse baskets.

I am flummoxed by a new lens spot that is not responding to cleaning.  It is sort of funny how many pocket cams we own, each with some sort of flaw.

The Anchorage Cottages

We learned from the housekeeper, while doing the usual weeding and deadheading (but not watering)  that the most asked about plant right now is Leycesteria formosa.  She wanted an ID.  I gave her the common name and the info that the berries are edible and taste like burnt caramel, but with a bitter aftertaste.

Leycesteria formosa (Himalayan honeysuckle)


Leycesteria formosa

I also showed her how the Melianthus major in the center courtyard smells like peanut butter.

center courtyard


Melianthus major

And I showed her that the petals of yellow tuberous begonias taste like lemon.

tuberous begonia

The chocolate cosmos is already a regular feature at the Anchorage, and I promised that next year I would try to add a 7 Up plant (Stachys ‘Hidalgo’) to the array.

In deadheading the sweet peas, I saw this:

It was suggested that this might be the frog who lives in the key box (where guests are no longer allowed to drop their keys) but no, I looked…

key box frog is still there


Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’

window box from indoors (Allan’s photo)


Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ seeds mimicking the rope in the sign

I asked Allan to take the tatty old painted sage out of a pot and replace them with a chrysanthemum.

Allan’s photos

 Because I said sage and not sages, he left the white one in.  I pulled it, leaving the chrysanth off center.  Oh well!

Klipsan Beach Cottages

When we arrived at KBC, a guest had just checked in for a brief stay and introduced herself as a blog reader!  She was Dawn, sister of Debbie W who comments regularly, and although I had met both of them while touring recently near Menlo, my face blindness kept me from recognizing her.  It was a delight to see her at KBC (which she had read about on the blog, and had visited years ago).

me and Dawn: Hi, Debbie!

Allan and I did the usual deadheading and grooming and weeding, with no need to water (We love that!)

looking in the east gate


the bird bath view

After yesterday’s daytime scorching heat and evening wind, lots of leaves and fir needles had fallen into the garden.

Mary raking the paths


in the fenced garden


one of Mary’s roses


All summer I pull Japanese anemones, and then I love them when they bloom.


Podophyllum (Allan’s photo)


Bella on the lawn (Allan’s photo)


Bella in the basement as we left (Allan’s photo)

Port of Ilwaco

We decided to get a head start on tomorrow’s work by watering and weeding along Howerton Avenue at the Port, starting at the east end.

When we arrived home to pick up another hose, we found a shocking sight.  Our quiet, bucolic, country-feeling street had been painted with bright lines.  I do not like it.  Allan thinks it is going to speed up traffic instead of making it safer.

the way it used to be


now

Since the double yellow line means no passing, a traffic cop could write tickets all day three blocks west at the post office, where passing and U turns are frequent.  When I kvetched about it on Facebook, I learned that other residents (just some that I know) are also not thrilled.  We wished we had been asked or notified. It is what it is now.  (We learned the next day that the Department of Transportation done-it.) There is not enough paint remover to take us back in time.

It cheered me up to pet Rudder from next door.

At the east end of Howerton Avenue, I made the radical decision to simply skip watering the easternmost bed.  Some rain is predicted for later this week—not much, but enough to help this quite drought tolerant bed.  I think my snap decision was influenced by feeling disgruntled about the street painting job.

east end bed


Yesterday’s heat scorched even the armeria (sea thrift); watering today will not fix that.

If we get no rain, we will have to break down and water this garden on Friday.  It is the most difficult and requires the longest hose length.

We found a rock in a garden bed further west:

As I walked along weeding, I made mental note of plants I want to move in the fall, like this Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ that is languishing in the bed by the Fort George Brewery office.

sad Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

Further down the street, in my favourite bed, the same grass is doing much better.

by the Ilwaco pavilion, more sheltered from wind


a happier Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

I am not doing much clipping back today.  I want as much plant growth as possible in all the beds to keep people from standing upon them during Friday evening’s Slow Drag.

The drive-over garden has knit together again.


Port Office garden


low tide with haze, possibly from wildfire smoke upriver mixed with fog


can’t see the hills to the east at all


Howerton Ave: smoke or fog? We could smell smoke, faintly. (Allan’s photo)

Our friends in Portland and Olympia are experiencing heavy smoke and falling ash from the fire east of Portland in the beloved wilderness area of the Columbia River Gorge.  Some photos: here, and here (before) and here.

We left off at Time Enough books and will do the rest of the watering tomorrow afternoon and evening.

 

 

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Sunday, 3 September 2017

We left on our day trip before 10 AM, along with a bowl of tabouli and some chocolate cupcakes for a potluck and open garden over two hours inland.

My next door neighbour, Royal, saw us off.

Our route: We had another 15 minutes still to go when we got to Castle Rock.

The first part of our drive, east of the Astoria bridge: The Columbia River abounded with little boats fishing.  (Taken while on the move; we were on too much a mission to stop for better pics)

As we passed through Castle Rock, I glimpsed some enticing public gardens.  We will visit those in tomorrow’s post.

Our destination was the garden of Evan Bean, who has worked at Longwood Garden, Plant Delights (with our friend Todd), Cistus, and now works for Plantlust.com.  His garden, at his family home about 15 minutes east of Castle Rock, was open for garden bloggers and friends.

When we arrived, met by heat in the high 90s, a few other guests had already arrived, including Sean, owner of the fabulous Cistus Nursery and Jane of the Mulch Maid blog.

Allan’s photo, as we approach the kitchen door

Needing to adjust to the heat, we indulged in the delicious potluck offerings before touring the garden.  In conversation with Evan’s mum, Nancy, we learned that the two headed calf in Marsh’s Free Museum (Long Beach, home of Jake the Alligator Man), belonged to her grandfather’s side show. Her father, “Pony Bill” Giberson, had pony rides where the Long Beach carousel now sits.  (I thought I had this right, but Evan has clarified that “my mother’s father, Leonard, donated the two-headed calf. Her grandfather, Bill, had the pony rides.”)  Nancy herself has had a career in forestry, and encouraged Evan as a child to appreciate nature.

Fortified and refreshed, we plunged into the heat and a full tour of Evan’s garden.

the impressively small ladies in waiting collection

Garden writer Amy Campion in the greenhouse, with Evan reflected in the door

The greenhouse has a mister for the plants that Evan is propagating.  I am pleased and hopeful that Allan took an interest in how it works.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

plant babies

treasures

Near the greenhouse, Nancy showed us a stump that had resisted digging out, so they burnt it to represent nearby Mount St Helens and planted a Mt St Helens azalea in it.

burnt stump

Jane photographing the circular front garden bed.

Allan’s photo

The round bed was Evan’s high school senior project, on which he spent much more time than most seniors did on theirs.  He has enhanced and improved it since then.  (He’s now in his almost-late 20s.) It had much plant interest to offer us.  We walked around it admiring everything.

Sesli gummiferum (Moon Carrot), which I very much wish I had.

Notice all the pleasing rocks in the garden.

Jane noticing the details

continuing around

two kinds of ornamental oregano

Allan’s photo

The garden bed seems round but is actually more complex.

Allan’s photo

Having made it all the way around, I turned my attention to the bed by the house.

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some form of Melianthus next to the house (Later: Evan says it is Melianthus villosus.

easy access and I like the railings

The shade of the lower garden enticed me and others.  The rest of the garden that we will see is less than a year old, except, says Evan, “a section of the rhododendron border behind the hakonechloa bed, and a scattering of trees through the rest of the garden”.

the hakanechloa bed

By now, our friend Ann (the Amateur Bot-ann-ist) had arrived, with Paul Bonine, owner of the glorious Xera Plants, from whom I would buy one of every Xera plant if I lived in Portland.

Ann in the red checked shirt

The dry creek was installed to solve some drainage problems.

starry detail

sunny wall of house

In Evan’s words: “The annual wildflowers, and even some of the fast-growing perennials and subshrubs like Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, Salvia officinalis ‘Purpurascens’, and similar plants, were mostly put in place to fill in space and cover the ground to help reduce weeds while longer-lived plants grow. They were plants I could obtain cheaply and easily propagate more of. In some cases, I’m not even sure yet what the longer-lived plants should be, so they obviously haven’t even been planted. In most of the garden, the longer-lived plants will have to be ones that can adapt to dappled shade as the cork oaks and other trees grow. I picture layers of relatively drought-tolerant evergreen shrubs like Elaeagnus, Choisya, Mahonia repens and nervosa, mixed with a few tough, easy-care evergreen herbaceous plants like various carex for textural contrast, and here and there some deciduous perennials or ephemeral plants for added seasonal variation. Some of those plants are already in place. Some have yet to be selected and planted.”

the path back to the shady patio

 

As I knew it would be, this was the sort of garden where I could not identify a fair number of the plants.  Any mistakes are mine from when I was too shy to ask.

Tricyrtis ‘Blue Wonder’ (I asked Evan for IDs on some of these plants.)

Allan’s photo

heading into the sunshine

looking back from whence I came

The fence encloses about two acres and keeps the deer out. Evan’s mom, a forester, says that our west coast deer are lazy and that a six foot fence is enough. She also said they have a fear of breaking their legs.  Other species of deer WILL jump a six foot fence.

A group of gardeners clustered around this plant pronounced it some sort of gentian.  Evan later IDed it for us: Gentiana asclepiadea, the willow gentian.

a young castor bean

seed heads of Dranunculus vulgaris

Dranunculus vulgaris

Mimulus cardinalis

Calceolaria arachnoidea

I am smitten with this plant.

Evan recommends orange Calceolaria ‘Kentish Hero’.

kniphofia

castor bean with beautiful airy coreopsis

Brachyglottis greyi, or it might be Brachyglottis ‘Otari Cloud’, says Evan.

These beds which are full sun will eventually have a bit of shade.

Allan’s photo

more lovely free flowing coreopsis

Heptacodium miconioides, which I knew, because I have one, thanks to my friend Debbie Teashon of Rainyside Gardeners.

This little guy got lots of attention.


Evan says, “”The wildflower look is sort of nice, but really not my style. It’s a planned successional stage in the gardens development, filling in space while the real garden grows.””

I must have been mad during my phase of not liking rudbeckias.

This poppy got lots of attention.

Allan’s photo

new growth.  Later I got the ID from Evan: Glaucium flavum var. aurantiacum

The shady patio is where we would soon be sitting again.

Zauschneria

Allan’s photo

a hardy geranium of some sort

the path back to the shady patio

looking out from our shady chairs

Allan’s photo

patio corner

outside the kitchen window

When we walked down to our van to depart, Nancy walked with us and, because we showed interest, took us to the kitchen garden.  It is located below the garage because the rest of the property used to be so shady.

tomatoes

yacon

That was a fine day out, with more to come, as we will tour some Castle Rock gardens on the way home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Since early summer, I had been corresponding with Terri, the organizer of the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County garden tour, ever since contacting her to confirm the date of their 2017 tour.  She had invited us to come visit her garden sometime this summer.  When she sent me these photos in late June, I knew I just had to go there.

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Today Allan and I got up early and drove two hours to the garden.  The property is named for Cynthia Markham who first claimed it in the mid 19th century.  Long before that, these shoreline acres were probably walked by the members of the Shoalwater Bay tribe.

As we approached, down a long dead end road, I exclaimed in joy.

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I knew right away, from my first sight of the garden bed lit by sunshine at the end of the road, that we were in for something special.

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to our left along the driveway

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looking back along the driveway

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The old tubs used to be used for horse watering troughs.

Two horses grazed over the fence by where we parked.  We soon learned that they are named Woody and Gus after characters in Lonesome Dove.  The white horse, Woody, is 35 years old and Gus is about 26.

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Allan’s photo

We were greeted by Ilsa, a 15 month old recently adopted rescue dog who soon became my new dear friend.  She used to be a city dog and now lives in paradise.

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Ilsa turning back at the sound of Terri’s voice.  This is the entry garden that I had seen from far up the road.

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Ilsa and her tennis ball (Allan’s photo).  To the left of the driveway is a vast field of blueberries.

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a stand of persicaria backed with phlox

Terri welcomed us and we walked slowly up toward the house, admiring the long driveway garden at every step along the way.

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to our right

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To our left. Teucrium hyrcanicum “Purple Tails’. I thought it was a salvia.  Must have!

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that face! 🙂

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to our left: Verbena bonariensis and phlox

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to our right: I was amazed to learn that this huge plant is a persicaria, Persicaria polymorpha, which I must acquire.

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to our right, smokebush smoking

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Look closely and you will see that the top of the stump is planted with teucrium.

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In this area and elsewhere, several enormous trees came down in the Great Coastal Gale of 2007.  Although she and Bill had owned the property by then for many years and had cleared the rhododendron forest from being completely overgrown by bindweed and more, and had grown  vegetables, it was not till after the gale that Terri focused on creating the ornamental garden.

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To our right: We are still walking up the driveway!

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to our left

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Ilsa got ahead of us.

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Ilsa by the pond

Waldo Pond got its name from “Where’s Waldo?”, as in looking for the frogs on the lily pads.  We only saw one today.  Terri says they hop off into the garden during the day.

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by Waldo Pond

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Some water has evaporated over our dry summer.

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Just past the pond is the house and garage.

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garage wall

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We met Terri’s spouse, Bill, and went up onto the deck where a group of chairs sat around a fireplace.

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The loon is a recurring symbol here.

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(taken later in the day)

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I was so focused on the deck’s ambience and on the bay view that it took me till I looked at my photos to see the second story skybridge going between the house and the garage.

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On the deck overlooking Grays Harbor.

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The wide deck goes all the way around the house.

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outside the kitchen window

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Allan’s photo

After walking all around the deck, Terri and Allan and I embarked upon a tour of the winding paths through the garden along the north side of the driveway.

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The paths strayed hither and yon, opening up into small clearing and vignettes.

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corylopsis leaves catching the sun

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Hydrangea and fuchsia magellanica

Terri and I had already figured out, through her reading of this blog and through email correspondence, that we share similar taste in plants.

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As you can see, Ilsa accompanied us through the garden.

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lacecap hydrangea

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Hydrangea aspera

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Hydrangea aspera

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textural Corylopsis leaves

A clearing revealed Terri’s latest project in progress, made from broken concrete.

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Hydrangea paniculata

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gorgeous

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Some garden art found at Pier 1

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Lamprocapnos scandens

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Lespedeza thunbergii (Bushclover)

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Cotinus (Smokebush)

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We walked down a slope on a paths that was easy, with non slippery mulch and nice wide steps.

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To the north is the alder wood.  You can just see the top of Terri’s head!

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I think this is Arundo donax variegata.

Terri is going off of big grasses that flop all over the place.  The one above is well behaved.

A long river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ spills down the hill, about fifty of them, planted ten years ago. By this late in the summer, some of the crocosmia has flopped over the river of blue; Terri said she is planning to thin the crocosmia for that reason.

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with a scrim of Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’

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Allan’s photo

Below the Rozanne River lies the alder wood, also part of the property and also with paths.  We did not go into the woods because Ilsa is a newly adopted dog, and Terri does not want her to learn about those paths until she is sure to return home.

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to the west, the contained (by a concrete ditch, I think) bamboo grove (Allan’s photo)

Looking to the east, we could see Woody grazing in the pasture.

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Allan’s photo

As we climbed the hill again, I admired a low wall that I had walked right by before.

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made from a natural looking manufactured block, much better looking than “cottage” blocks.

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a sit spot

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colour and texture

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persicaria

When Terri and Bill’s children were young and they had first acquired the farm and were just spending weekends there from Seattle, they got rid of the television and have used the satellite dish as a planter ever since.  It conceals the access to the septic tank.

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approaching the house again

Their grandson loves the winding secret paths.  I was thinking how amazing it must be for children to visit there, something they will remember for a lifetime.

We took a short break for glasses of water in the kitchen.

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the old farmhouse kitchen ceiling (Allan’s photo)

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kitchen window (Allan’s photo)

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Allan noticed this interesting chair! Bill pointed out they were a north wind motif.

Refreshed, we embarked upon a walk toward the beach.  On the way, we admired more garden beauty.

To the south of the driveway is an enormous field of blueberries, transplanted from a farm and now a sanctuary for birds.

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next to the driveway fence

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Terri’s newest garden bed is a collection of pollinator friendly plants.

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echinaceas and more

Because the garden is not deer fenced, Terri has found an interesting way to repel deer.  She soaks tennis balls in deer repellent (heavy on the eggs!) and puts them on stakes around the garden.

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However, do you see Ilsa in the background?  She loves tennis balls and goes after the stinky staked ones.

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This open air pavilion is where an old forge used to stand, evidenced by piles of ashes found downhill.  I think it incorporates some of the forge building or an old carriage house.

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Allan’s photo

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the pavilion

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loon carving

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Bill and I

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looking east at the blueberry field from where the beach trail begins.

The many photos from our walk on the beach will be a bonus post, tonight.

Ilsa took a short nap upon our return from the beach. (Allan’s photo)

When we returned, Bill made us delicious burgers for lunch.  He called them smash burgers, made from a ball instead of a patty and smashed under a weight so that they are crispy on both sides.  That, and a salad made with avocado and endive that was eaten too eagerly to be photographed, went down a treat.

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quite honestly the best burger I’ve ever had

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Ilsa sits nobly by while we dine at a picnic table.

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our view toward Waldo pond

As I gazed from the picnic table to the pond, one small conifer shone like a golden torch.  It is not as evident in the photo as it was to my eyes.  You can see it next to an orb toward the left, above; it is Thuja platycladus ‘Weedom’.

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peach and apple cobbler for dessert

Soon after we had arrived, we had learned (to my vast relief!) that Bill and Terri share our thoughts about current events. That made for sympatico lunchtime conversation, which is a great comfort these days.

After lingering over our meal, we took a walk down the driveway to see the horses before saying goodbye.

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Some flowers on the way:

Verbena bonariensus

Persicaria (Allan’s photo)

Phlox (Allan’s photo)

The glorious Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’ again. Terri says it holds its colour for a long time. (Allan’s photo)

Buddleia (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Barn wall (Allan’s photo)

Terri and Gus

Gus enjoying carrots

Here comes Woody. (Allan’s photo)

Woody is mostly blind. Terri tossed down some carrots for him but Gus got them first.

Woody moved away. (Allan’s photos)

Later that night, Woody got apple peels to make up for it.

As we got into our van to leave, I noticed one more cool little tree.

Allan’s photo

It is Staphylea pinnata (European Bladdernut), one that is new to me.

We drove off from an idyllic, perfect visit with seedpods on the dashboard.


If you are smitten with this garden, you’ll have a chance to see it next July on the Grays Harbor Master Gardener tour. It is a garden I will be revisiting in my mind many times and will find well worth the drive to visit in another season.

Tonight’s bonus post: Our midday walk on the beach below the garden.

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden three: Bye Bye Deer

Note again that the garden description includes credit to the designers and caretakers. We admire and appreciate that so much.   I was especially excited to see this garden because one of its caretakers and plant designers is Jessica Schleif, who has been an inspiration to me ever since I saw her ad many years ago that read “Hand Tool Gardening”.

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The sidewalk garden beds

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the stairs up into the garden

Allan got a photo from across the street, from a garden which he was able to visit even though it was not one of the tour gardens.  (A bonus post, next!)

Up the stairs I went.

at the top of the stairs

to my right at the top of the stairs

I was drawn forward by the sight of a patio on the east side of the house.

informative material from The Xerces Society.

patio plantings

 

I backtracked to the front garden.

south side of house

Allan noticed the little ornamental pepper plant.

Allan’s photo

I continued to explore the front garden.

looking west

looking south: Jessica also works on the garden across the street.

Allan’s photo

I walked past the east side patio to the back garden.

another look at patio containers

in the shade of the back garden

view to the north of the Columbia River

looking northwest

You can see the Astoria bridge.

Allan’s photo

shady north wall bed with lilies yet to bloom

north side of house

Allan’s photo

back garden, looking east

the serpentine path

west side of house

white agapanthus

returning to the front garden; there is Jessica her ownself.

southwest corner of the garden

the front garden again

We walked round the garden again with Jessica.

Below where Jessica is sitting in the following photo is the garden debris area, and a planted slope which I wish we had walked around the block to see.

Jessica in the northeast corner of the garden

the debris area (Allan’s photo)

the planted slope (Allan’s photo)

Years ago, when Jessica first told me about her gardening, I loved that that she informed new clients that she would not haul debris away.  I thought at the time that her reason was because hauling is difficult, time-consuming, and requires a truck or trailer.  Today I learned that one of the main reasons is that she wants to encourage people to compost on site.

One last look at the front garden before we go:

looking west

Tonight, a bonus post for avid garden tourers.  We got to look at the garden across the street, another project of Jessica’s, even though it was not on the tour.

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Thursday, 10 August 201

Before we left for work, Devery brought us some of a big organic cabbage grown by a friend and told us that she had adopted a little Chihuahua pug dog, which I could meet at the end of the day.

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our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office…needs more santolina in the front.  Next year!

Long Beach

We had had a trace of rain overnight, not enough to save us from the watering of the Long Beach planters.  Today, the job went faster because it wasn’t street tree watering day.

First we deadheaded at the welcome sign.  Allan ran the string trimmer around it.

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Allan’s photo

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front

I wish I had taken a photo before trimming the corner plant of Geranium ‘Orion’.  I want to show how much better Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is.

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after trimming deadheads off of Orion

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Rozanne does not need deadheading and does not have a plain green center to the plant.

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Rozanne is bigger and bluer.

Rozanne, I let myself be tempted by someone else.  I wish I had nothing but you for the blue in the Long Beach welcome sign garden.  I regret that I strayed.

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back of sign with Rozanne at the ends and Orion in the middle.

In the fall, Orion is coming out of that planter and will be replaced with all Rozanne.

We split up to water the downtown planters.  Allan went north and I went south.

One of my first planters was by the carousel.

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The last two times I have watered the four planters within sound of the carousel, the music has been 80s—Girls Just Wanna Have Fun, You Spin Me Round (Dead or Alive), leading to almost painful nostalgia.  Today, the song was Karma Chameleon by Culture Club, reminding me intensely of the ten years that horror writer Wilum Pugmire lived in my attic.  We drifted apart after I moved (for a long time he did not even have email).  By leaving Seattle, I terribly disrupted his living situation (although it did turn out well in the end).

He adored Boy George and his attire evoked both Boy George and his other beloved icon, Barbra Streisand.

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me and Wilum almost exactly thirty years ago (1987) and Wilum in his full regalia

Sometimes the memories evoked by the carousel music are almost too much for me.

Moving on to the next set of planters, I was immensely cheered by these four fierce chihuahas.

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first three.

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Then a fourth one appeared.

As I watered the nearby planter, I saw many passersby amused by this quartet.  (The day was cool, almost cold, and the window was cracked open.)

I started thinking happily about my new neighbour, Devery’s chi-pug dog, whom I would soon meet.  I suddenly realized that he was the very same dog, Roy, that I’d noticed in the local humane society’s availability update.  He had appealed to me because I so like the Basket Case Greenhouse chi-pug, Buddy.  And now Roy would be my dog-neighbour! (Devery is calling him “Royal”.)

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I looked Roy’s picture up on the humane society Facebook page.

A little further on, I admired the latest tigridia blooms and noticed their crown-like center.

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Today’s tigridia

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At the south end of downtown, a sign amused me.  I’ve looked at it every week and never noticed the missing letter till now.

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I admired the excellent window boxes at Dooger’s Restaurant:

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from across the street

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and closer

And also the window box at Lighthouse Realty.

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Moving along…

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Gladiolus papilio

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the wildflower meadow look

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Lily ‘Black Beauty’ in Fifth Street Park

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Lilium ‘Black Beauty’; note the green furrows

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Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ and catmint

Photos from Allan’s watering walkabout:

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traffic jam

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Agastaches in Lewis and Clark Square planter

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Cosmos ‘Sonata’ and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

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Coulter Park: two fallen cosmos on the lawn

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Cosmos and Berberis ‘Helmond Pillar’

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snapdragons and agastache

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Geranium ‘Rozanne’

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Agastache

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Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and santolina

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Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

With the planters all watered in good time, we took a break at Abbracci Coffee Bar.

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Allan’s photo; we leave our gear on the tree bench

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Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery had just delivered a brown sugar cake.

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flowers in Abbracci

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all gone (Allan’s photo)

We finished up Long Beach with some clipping in Fifth Street Park.

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I don’t think this garden is as good as usual this year.

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The problem is the cosmos, which should be tall, are short.  It seemed to me earlier this summer that the beds were not getting as much water as usual.

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In fall, I am going to divide and spread around the heleniums…

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…even though they clash with the backdrop of insipid, mildewy pink Dorothy Perkins rose.

Allan sent this man to me for a plant ID.  It was, of course, for the tigridia (Mexican shell flowers).

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Allan trimmed back this lady’s mantle…

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Alchemilla mollis

…and noticed the interesting seedheads (or spent flowers):

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I thinned this batch a bit.  It still has enough yellow to stay till next week.

We were done with plenty of time for our Ilwaco work tasks.

Ilwaco

We drove past our house to have a gander at the progress of the playground at the end of town.  Or so we planned, till I looked down Devery’s driveway and saw her with her new dog.  “Back up!” I cried, eager to meet a new friend.  Never mind the playground for today.

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my new friend, Royal

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He’s so soft and sleek.

Royal was rescued from a kill shelter in California and brought to our local no-kill shelter, where he was lucky enough to be found by Devery.

Allan went to water the Ilwaco planters, while I weeded at the Norwood and the J’s gardens.

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our own front garden

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the second of four beds that are outside the deer fence on the west side of the house

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elephant garlic next to Devery’s driveway

I got back to work:

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The J’s roses

I am pleased that the new hydrangeas in the Norwood garden are putting out new flowers (after I had to cut off the too-floppy flowers they came with).

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Endless Summer hydrangea coming back into bud

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Norwood garden Agapanthus and lavender

Just as I was leaving Norwoods, I saw Jay himself arrive…with a puppy, making the sixth darling small dog of the day.

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eight week old Julius

At home, buddies Smokey and Calvin were snoozing together.

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My last garden event of the day: harvesting cukes out of the greenhouse.

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Meanwhile, Allan watered the Ilwaco street trees and planters and got the photos I wanted that show how the planters enhance the town, even though they are small and mostly located in a difficult wind tunnel straight up from the river.

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The city hall planters are fancier because the staff gives them supplemental watering beyond our two times a week.

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This one half died for some reason.  Has been recently replanted.  Allan thinks the trailing rosemary looks like a waterfall under the fish mural.

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Our Jenna gives this one by her studio supplemental water.  Something is chomping the nasturtium leaves.

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Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Now we have three days off and a garden tour to anticipate.

Friday, 11 August 2017

I mostly just finished a mystery I was reading, except for a pleasant interlude when good  friend Judy S. and her spouse Larry came to see our lilies and to examine our deer fence.  I did only a minimum of gardening (fertilized containers) and took no photos.

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Judy appreciating the Stipa gigantea

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and the Melianthus major’s peanut butter scent.

The J’s sent over some freshly cleaned and cooked crab that Jay himself had caught that day on his boat.  I so appreciate not being given a live crab!

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before they were cleaned and cooked and turned into crab legs and shared

Allan, a much better householder than me, decided it was high time to defrost the refrigerator.  (It is old and frosts up quickly.)

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The mystery was Double Booked for Death (Black Cat Bookshop Series #1) by Ali Brandon.  I liked it well enough to order the sequel, even though I much prefer when cats do not help solve mysteries.  At least this one was not a talking cat.

We had our weekly garden club dinner at the Cove with Dave and Melissa.

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in the entry foyer at the Cove

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rhubarb cake

Tomorrow: The Astoria garden tour, at last!

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 9 August 2017

We checked on the J’s hydrangeas across the street.  I admired my sweet peas on the fence, one of only three sweet pea successes for me this year.  (The others are the Ilwaco boatyard garden and the Anchorage Cottages.)

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J’s sweet peas

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inside the fence

We watered at the Depot Restaurant and I completely forgot to take a photo. I think that’s a first.  I blame thinking too much about my sore heel.  The lilies still looked fine and the Persicaria ‘Firetail’ was in full bloom.

On the way to the Red Barn, I got a photo that I’d wanted last week of an attractive Seaview garden corner.

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As you can see, we had lovely, cool, grey weather.  If some of the greyness was from smoke, it did not smell of smoke our make our eyes burn.

The Red Barn

Allan watered and deadheaded and photographed.

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Red Barn garden

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gazania

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oregano

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Diane’s garden

I deadheaded and fertilized the containers and tidied the corner garden.

I finally decided the fireweed (known in the UK as rosebay willowherb) had to be pulled from alongside the road, before it goes to seed throughout the garden.

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before

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after

The cloud of blue is the best Perovskia (Russian Sage) I’ve ever grown and it comes back every year with increased vigor.

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Holly was on the porch.

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Stargazer lilies blooming in the container garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We did the usual tidying.

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looking in the east gate

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in the fenced garden (under the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’)

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looking up from the bench

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Here you can see the bench under the Tetrapanax

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agapanthus

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lilies and veronicastrum

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Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

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This lily has been blooming for three weeks.

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Cosmos ‘Seashells’

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan saw a mother and kit raccoon outside the fence at the woodsy end of the garden.  They hissed.

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Allan’s photo

Long Beach

We headed south to Long Beach and got a head start on tomorrow (Long Beach day again) by weeding Veterans Field gardens.

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flag pavilion garden with Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

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blue provided by eryngiums (Allan’s photo)

I was pleased when the woman from across the street walked by and said how much she likes the little corner garden.  I had been thinking it still looked pretty tatty after the front of it was run through by someone (human or dog) much earlier this season.

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‘Jackmans Blue’ rue, eryngiums, drumstick alliums in the corner garden (Allan’s photo)

We watered the Sid Snyder planters.  The folks at one of the two horse ride establishments said to me, “You’re the only one we’ve ever seen watering these planters.”   Yep, I said, it is only me (or Allan.)

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Horses and dogs were done for the day and being loaded into their truck and trailer.

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the westernmost planter (Allan’s photo)

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We checked on the kite museum garden.

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Patty said they had been getting lots of compliments on the new look.

Here is a before photo, showing it looking pretty tidy because we had just string trimmed it.  The hedge to the left was made of tatty old hebes.  Ed Strange (Strange Landscaping) did the river rock work.

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deadheading

Ilwaco Boatyard Garden

We finished with what I thought would be a short session but turned out to be about an hour and a half of weeding at the boatyard.  As the annual poppies get removed, the garden is looking more architectural.

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looking south

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looking north

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stems of Stipa gigantea (Allan’s photo)

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flowers of Stipa gigantea (Allan’s photo)

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must have more lilies next year

If there is a next year for gardens….I have been trying to appreciate every flower and garden moment more than ever with the possibility lurking of a nuclear winter, thanks to the blustering uncontrolled president…of this country.

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boat work (Allan’s photo)

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cute boatyard dog (Allan’s photo)

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a sleek metal boat with headlights

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local fisherman and his very good friend Ernie

When I got home, I was pleased to find Smokey and Calvin snoozing together again.

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Friday, 4 August 2017

Before work, Jenna (Queen LaDeDa) came over to find out what plant cuttings she could have for a Jake the Alligator Man event costume: a “wild woman”.  While I did not have anything to make a mossy head dress with, we found all sorts of ideas while walking through the garden.  She will come tomorrow morning, probably before we wake, to acquire the materials, because it is too early to cut them now.

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Jenna and I on the hunt for plant costume ideas.

After she departed, I started to pick four bouquets for my favourite Art Night participants.  I ran out of steam after two bouquets.

Port of Ilwaco

I delivered a bouquet to Don Nisbett’s Art Gallery.  (He is Jenna’s spouse.)

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And to Salt Hotel.

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Allan watered the Time Enough Books curbside garden and did some other garden tidying in the area.

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We finished weeding the south end of the boatyard garden.

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battling the scrimmy little horsetail

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I pictured lots of people parading along here between a downtown gallery and the port this evening.

From a distance, Allan thought the name of this incoming boat was “Sleepwear”.

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Allan’s photo

Allan liked the idea shown below, of a rope tied to the hose on the boatyard faucet that people use to power wash their boats.  It keeps the faucet from being yanked by the hose, he says.

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While we had been near Time Enough Books, I’d seen shop owner Karla.   She said she would be at the museum this evening for their exhibit opening and so I thought I might just give a third bouquet to the museum.  We took a break to go home and make one more bouquet.

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Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

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Seaview

On the way to Long Beach, we stopped by the cannabis emporium to get me a product that the Freedom Market does not have in stock.

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Mr Doobie’s in Seaview

I’ve been taking a tincture called Ethos 2:1, mostly CBD, on the recommendation of a friend.  As promised, it does not get me high but what I think it has done is almost eliminate my back spasms.  I doubt it’s a placebo effect because I combine all new medications with a big dose of skepticism.

We acquired these photos, two blocks from the pot shop, of a garden I enjoy in passing.

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peeking over the fence

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Across the street from that garden, I asked Allan to photograph the deck railing that I quite like.  The garden is good, too.  We had a communication breakdown over getting a photo that included the garden on the corner of the property.  Maybe next week.

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Long Beach

Allan thought a drive-through coffee would be helpful for the day.

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Horses had been through the drive through before us!

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at the drive through window

I thought all we had to do in Long Beach was to give the planter at the end of Sid Snyder Drive some water (done!) and then dump yesterday’s debris.  On the way to city works, we found one more thing to do.

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Minnie Culbertson Park, before

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after

I had seen an ad in the local paper about a wee dahlia “farm” in the town. (I left off the line with the phone number:)

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Of course, we had to have a look.

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gardener Dale picking a bouquet for a visitor

He said there will be lots more dahlias starting next week.  He was also offering lots of little plants for sale in cute little containers:

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My grandma would have loved the wooden shoe.

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Allan’s photo

Dale’s pond had sprung a leak.  You can see it will be good-looking when re-filled.

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Basket Case Greenhouse

We needed soil and plants for an Ilwaco planter.

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new shade cloth entryway

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Allan’s photo

Buddy wanted to get in our van and Allan handed him to me.

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Roxanne and I joked that I was taking him home.

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I gave this little darling back most reluctantly.

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Klipsan Beach Cottages

We’d postponed our weekly cleanup of KBC because of Wednesday’s heat.  I clipped a whole lot of brown lady’s mantle out of the driveway garden and have no photos to show for that.  After working, we took photos for the KBC Facebook page (which I administrate).

The sky was still grey with a smoke haze from the fires in Canada.

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lawn border

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in the fenced garden

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I cannot ID this special plant, a gift from Mary’s plantsman brother, with golden yew.

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Veronicastrum and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ (kind of a fail photographing white, as usual)

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Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

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birdbath view

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Allan’s photo

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the pond island

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I see they bought those string lights that were “shiny objects” to me last time we went to Costco.  If I see them for sale again, I will not resist. Or maybe I will resist because we don’t have effective outdoor outlets.  Oh well!

The Anchorage Cottages

On the way south, we made the briefest stop at the Anchorage.  Since we had been there Monday this week, I felt we should do a second quick deadheading.

I am quite worked up about how this dierema is darker than any of my others.

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This thrills me.  I wonder if it would come true from seeds.

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in the office courtyard (Allan’s photo)

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When it was built, partly by moving WWII cottages from Cape Disappointment, the Anchorage was Ocean Front. Now, because of beach accretion, it is about a half mile from the beach.  A path leads through piney woods to the shore.

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Astilbe and Fuchsia ‘Pat’s Dream’

As I had begun to deadhead, I’d asked Allan to photograph an adorable caravan in the car lot at the corner.

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such a cute face

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I smile in response.

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Would make a great guest house.

Ilwaco

We drove past the boatyard garden to see the crowds of strolling art walk patrons that I had imagined…and saw no one at all till we drove past the galleries along the port.

We had every intention of immediately finishing the day by planting up the Ilwaco planter that got dug out, due to poor drainage, last weekend.  That is, until I looked at my Ilwaco Facebook feed on my phone to see if there were some last minute Art Walk posts that I could share to Discover Ilwaco.

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I saw this photo from the museum!

The exhibit opening was on a topic that interests us.  We had planned to see it later in the month because of a reluctance for peopling (me) and simply wanting to get the work day done.  But the snacks called to us and soon we were there.

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Join the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum as we explore the history of “Derbyville” and the early years of salmon derbies, recreational fishing, and the emergence of the charter-boat fishing industry on the Long Beach Peninsula. This exhibit will be on view August 4 – October 7, 2017.

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the big room (The plates were about to get replenished)

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Allan’s photo.  Someone at the museum said “No one’s ever brought us flowers before.”  That gives me a new bouquet target.

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center: Dan and his wife had just toured our garden today (by invitation).  (Allan’s photo)

We did not have time to thoroughly peruse the exhibit.  I can see it is one that I will very much enjoy.

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I like this sort of display.

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This history goes back to when our garden was riverfront property, before the port was built out on fill.

Information about the mayor, for whom our street of curbside gardens at the Port if named:

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We had to get back to work and plant the planter by the fire station.

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Allan made the small hole, added this week by the city crew, bigger.

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new plants getting firmed up

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red for the fire station, including Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

At home, our neighbor Mary from two doors down brought us some freshly caught salmon and, of course, I dragged her back to see the towering, fragrant lilies.

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Skooter indicated that he would like to have a campfire some evening soon.

Now for two days off, with some more lily guests invited.

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