Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘private gardens’ Category

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

We had run into Steve and John at the 6×6 art auction three days before and were invited to tour their latest garden expansion.  On this cold and windy late afternoon, we bundled up and examined the entire garden…except for the beds on the east side, by the bay, from whence the wind came.  The tour was so interesting that we hardly commented on the cold.

Our tour started as we drove up to the house.

the driveway in

two beautiful piles of mulch that had just been delivered

young gingko by the irrigation pond

Met by Steve and John by the house, we began our walking tour.

This bed to the south east of the house was salal just a few days ago.  It is a hard task to get all the roots of that vigorously running native out of the ground, especially under a tree.

John picks a non variegated leaf off of a new variegated hydrangea.

The whole south side has been cleared of scrubby trees, including holly.

The tidal stream marking the edge of the property is now revealed.

Allan’s photo

I teased Steve and John that they would now be stretching a plank across the stream to lie on and trim the sword ferns on the other side.

I would have thought for sure the new shrub, below, in a new bed, was a rhododendron.  It is not.

Rhododendron ‘Pinky Purple People Eater’

Looking back on the new area. The tall old species rhododendrons to the left will enjoy the increased light.

Here is how it looked (not from exactly the same spot) earlier this year:

16 July 2017

We continued our walk to the west.

Foreground: Rhododendron ‘Cherries and Merlot’

Arbor Care from Astoria had done the expert clearing and had also limbed up the remaining trees. Steve and John said that when Arbor Care is done, you can’t even tell they were there (other than the results), because all the debris is chipped and cleaned up.

The photo below from January 1st demonstrates the difference in how the trees look now.

1 January 2017

We crossed the driveway, where the garden beds are also expanding.

a sinuous new bed

a fairly recent bed in the northwest lawn

Allan took notice of this tree, Athrotaxis cupressoides (Pencil Pine)

the very newest lawn bed of all

Each new plant gets some attention and admiration.

Quercus alnifolia (golden oak)

Quercus alnifolia (golden underside of leaves)

Allan noticed wire laid to discourage deer.

An independent minded dawn redwood which lost its leader and turned into a shrub.

The redwood on the other side of the driveway had behaved like a regular tree. This one…not. (Allan’s photo)

At least one big tree has been removed from this view, looking east over the pond.

Compare to May 2 of 2015.

May 2, 2015, on the Rhodie Tour

We walked back up the driveway, admiring the pushing back of scrubby salal and undergrowth on the south side, giving the garden greater depth..

Allan admired a fern.

the cryptomeria grove

Even though the photo below, from May 2, 2015, is from a little further to the east, it shows the difference that the clearing and limbing up has made.

May 2, 2015

center: Cryptomeria ‘Black Dragon’

right: Rhododendron ‘Ever Red’

Rhododendron ‘Hill’s Bright Red’

another new area

We admired more plants in the mature beds, planted in late spring 2009, to the northwest of the house.

Acer ‘Bijou’ in gold

Rhododendron ‘Yellow Hammer’

Rhododendron ‘Yellow Hammer’ blowing in the wind.

Rhododendron ‘Yellow Hammer’ (Allan’s photo)

autumnal hosta

(background) Rhododendrons closing their leaves against the cold wind

Brrr. They will close their leaves even more against winter’s cold.

Allan’s photo

Rhododendron pachysanthum by the front door

in the courtyard, looking through the breezeway (Allan’s photo)

coral bark maples

the last of the dahlias and the green roofed pump house

falling leaves

a look to the west before retreating indoors

same view on July 16 ’17

From the kitchen, we looked across the lower level to the stormy bay.  At a high winter tide, the water will come up over the rough grass.

south east corner: The evergreen huckleberry glade and the outlet of the tidal stream

view to the north: To the rear is Sorbus ‘Pink Pagoda’

A friend had given John and Steve some quinces, from which John had made a special treat, Quince membrillo, served with Monchego cheese, a delicious cheese made from the milk of Manchega sheep.  Served on crackers, it brought back memories of my grandmother’s quince jelly.

Quince membrillo

We admired a new piece of art that they had recently acquired from local woodcarver Jim Unwin.

by Jim Unwin

We visited till early evening, about gardening and politics, little knowing the glorious news of the blue wave of Democrat victories that awaited us in the evening news.

If you would like to virtually tour this garden in different seasons, here are some of our past posts about it:

26 September, 2013

21 April 2014

16 June 2014

19 July 2014 (garden tour)

2 September 2014

7 March 2015

2 May 2015 (Rhodie Tour)

23 June 2015

21 April 2016

24 July 2016

1 January 2017

11 May 2017

16 July 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Skooter had spent the night in Allan’s laundry hamper. (Allan’s photo)

We made a quick check on Mayor Mike’s garden and then tidied and deadheaded at…

The Depot Restaurant

The rain has been enough to make ground level watering unnecessary.

north side flowers by Basket Case Greenhouse

The Red Barn

We met an absolutely darling little dog named Delly or Deli…I think.

the most perfect little dog

And I found an appropriately painted rock for a horse barn.

And met another lovely dog, Junior.

Junior’s person had just been attending to a horse stall and said to his dog, “Ok, horse time is over, now it’s dog time!”

Junior and his guy’s truck with our small garden in the background

We then went next door to

Diane’s garden

where Misty got a belly rub.

Diane agreed that the small strip of lawn outside the new fence can be removed for easier maintenance.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Someday very soon, that will be our project along with replanting the roadside garden.

Long Beach

deadheading the welcome sign

Veterans Field

While watering the containers by the Vet Field stage, I noticed something new:

I admired the rhododendron leaves in the mini park behind Lewis and Clark Square, where Allan pulled some of the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

Allan’s photos, before

after

Before watering the planters, we dumped our debris and then picked up our repaired lawn mower at Bailey’s Saw Shop, where I was amused by this sign (the basic labor rate is $70 per hour):

In downtown Long Beach, I went north, watering planters, while Allan went south.

City Crew member pressure washing in Fifth Street Park

I found a painted rock.

a sign for sale at The Wooden Horse gift shop

While watering outside Funland, I kept hearing a robotic voice saying “Space Invaders”.  For some reason, I was tempted to go in and play. (I did not.)

Funland

Funland planter

The planters were definitely thirsty, and just a few cosmos had gotten crispy.

Cosmos (Allan’s photo)

California poppies and hesperantha (Allan’s photo)

hesperantha and asters (Allan’s photo)

santolina before (Allan’s photos)

and after

Coreopsis ‘Star Cluster’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan found a rock.

The week had been somber because of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, as attested to by the half mast flags.

We finished Long Beach with a tidying of Fifth Street Park.

butterfly on aster in Fifth Street Park

Ilwaco

I walked around and checked most of the planters and street tree pocket gardens while Allan watered them.

Allan’s photos while filling the water tank at the boatyard:

My….

…was low because my foot hurt, so I did not make it to all of the planters.

Acidanthera in a mostly shady planter

I was mightily annoyed to find, in a planter outside the pharmacy, that a special diascia had been stolen….again.  I don’t know when it happened because Allan is usually the one to care for these planters.

Just a hole left, with the protective label dropped into the hole.

a plea ignored by the plant thief

The water trailer (Allan’s photo)

A photo of the missing tree spot (victim of a bad driver) turned into a before and after when I decided to do some pruning on a tree a block away.

before

My foot was hurting a lot, so I asked Allan to take a break from watering and drive me home before I did the final intersection.  It can wait till tomorrow.  Meanwhile, I cut some lower limbs off one of the street trees.  These are supposed to be columnar pears, but I find them anything but columnar.

Allan helping with my spontaneous mess

after (a bit more of the Portside Café now shows in the distance)

On the way home, we had noted a handsome stand of corn on Second Avenue.

New homeowners have made a new garden.

At home, a harvest:

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Ilwaco post office garden


I always think I do not like the yellow evening primrose. And yet look how pretty this accidental one is.

Long Beach

We began Long Beach at city hall with the plan of pulling a lot of the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and then then clearing out the boring Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ planter by the gazebo, getting new soil in buckets from city works, and redoing the planter with the plants we had brought with us.

cars and flowers meet at the edge of the parking lot

There is a whole wall of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ on the south of the west side (not planted by us! I would have picked something else.)

before


I set out to clip back the Miscanthus ‘Variegatus’ from the sidewalk.

I then noticed that one of the two escallonias had produced three feet of new growth and decided to clip it away from the building.  Look who I found while clipping:

Pacific tree frog and snail

I am so glad I got that photo just before froggie jumped off.

As I clipped the escallonia, Parks Manager Mike drove by and called out a request, that we clip back the roses on the big pop out, one block south, because of sight line issues.  That changed the day’s plan considerably.  Soon after, I decided to cut the escallonia down very low so that it would better match the much smaller one at the other end of the garden.  Meanwhile, I asked Allan to take the pick and remove the big armeria on the corner by the escallonia; it was a haven for creeping buttercup and was too far out over the wall.

Allan’s photos: before…


and after


after

While Allan finished, I clipped back the huge Aruncus (goats beard) on the north side.

during


after

The aruncus has gotten too big for that spot.  Later this fall, we plan to dig it out and put it somewhere in Fifth Street Park (with a division going to my garden; it originally came from my previous garden).

Very little Crocosmia got pulled. 

The one thing we went there to do hardly got done at all.

Before even going to the pop out, we had so much debris that we had to dump.  We need revitalizing, yet the coffee drive through had four cars waiting so Allan said “Let’s go to the two guys.”  I knew exactly what he meant: Abbracci Coffee Bar, owned by Tony and Bernardo.

a Pink Poppy Bakery shortbread


fifteen minutes of relaxation


and a dulcimer player


Allan’s photo

While we were by Fifth Street Park for our coffee break, we went ahead and deadheaded there.

fall crocus (Allan’s photo)


At two o clock, the post-tourist season town was so quiet.


SW quadrant looking grand with Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’.


9-21-17

Next: the big pop out project.  As we parked, I thought that there was no way the sightline could be blocked by the rugosa roses.

before: You’d look left, and you’d look right when you were further out….

However, in recent years we have taken the pick and tried to push the roses back (to no avail, but at least they stayed shorter for the summer).  I did not mind cutting them.  I had told Mike I wished we could redo the whole thing, rebuilding the wall and putting in all new soil.  By we, I mean the city crew and big equipment.

after; we will prune the rest of the roses down hard later.

As we were working on this, a fellow on a motorcycle stopped and wanted to give us a $20 tip.  The same thing, with a different man, happened in Long Beach a couple of weeks ago, and that time I was able to kindly refuse.  Today’s gentleman would not take a refusal; he tucked the $20 in among the stems of the rugosa roses (and we did not leave it there).

A kitty came to visit.


Her roundness reminded me of my Mary.

With another full trailer, we made another run to city works, and this time we filled buckets with soil for the original project, redoing a city planter. 

While Allan got started digging the boring old geraniums out of the planter, I walked four blocks worth of planters to deadhead.

I saw a pug.


And the pug saw me.

On my walkabout, I collected some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, some creeping succulents, and some cut leaf saxifrage and then joined Allan at the planter project.  The sun had become hot, and the town had become busy with lots of onlookers, and we only had two hours to get the project done before a social event. The Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ roots are so pervasive that we had to dig a lot of soil out.  Even then, I thought maybe we had not dug enough.  I was afraid to put in the two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I brought.  Rozanne (blooming from late spring to first frost) is related to Johnson (which blooms for about a month, if that), and if Johnson got mixed up with Rozanne, then Johnson could use Rozanne as a base to try to take over the whole planter again.  I’ll wait to see how much JB sprouts back before I add Rozanne to this planter. Allan took all the photos here.

before


before

after; we salvaged two santolinas and two agastaches.


after


As the sun was setting, we checked on the kite museum garden.


kite museum (Allan’s photo)

During our planter re-do, I had gotten a text that changed our dinner plans.  We had been going to meet Dave and Melissa at El Compadre Mexican Restaurant for our weekly dinner.  Instead, we were all invited to the home of Lynn, who until recently was our beloved server at the Cove.

sun setting as we arrive (Allan’s photo)

Our destination was next door to Gene’s garden, which you may remember from the 2013 local garden tour.

Here was Gene’s garden in 2013:

And here it is now, with the changes that Gene made since then:

good job, Gene!


in 2013…


and now with a new west facing deck


Gene’s cottage

Next door, pretty porch lights welcomed us to Lynn’s cottage.

She had stocked the cooler with our favourite cider.

The cottage inside was every bit as perfectly beachy as the best Cannon Beach Cottage.

windowsill lights with shells

Bitty protecting her lair

Chloe was much friendlier than Bitty (who warmed up to us eventually).

my new friend


Chloe’s nook

We dined with seven friends on a pizza assortment and snacks. With Dave and Melissa, we stayed till late, sharing thoughts and stories.

At home, I found it satisfying to erase “planter re-do” from the work board.

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

We got a late start because of rain in the morning.  From last night to mid morning, we had had this much rain:

the rain gauge

So we would not have to water this week, much to our delight.

Calvin enjoying the overflowing water bowl.


Skooter enjoying the view from the roof.

The Depot Restaurant

…only needed a brief deadheading visit.

ornamental grasses around the dining deck


neat yellow bands on the Zebra grass (Miscanthus ‘Zebrinus’

Long Beach

We got a small head start on tomorrow’s Long Beach tasks.

deadheading at the welcome sign


welcome sign front


Allan’s photo


The “you” was blocked by unproductive cosmos greenery…


…so Allan fixed it.

Anchorage Cottages

Mitzu coming to greet us.


Allan’s photos: closing in


closer


and closer


center courtyard


Center courtyard arbutus was popular with bees and a hummingbird or two.


Soon we will trim the viburnums in this bed.


Cosmos ‘Sonata’ in the office planters (Allan’s photo)


Allan’s photo


sweet peas looking tatty…will give them just one more week….or two

The Planter Box

My quest for a few more plants for Diane’s septic box garden netted a couple of heathers, armeria and lavenders.  A good selection of fresh new plants on display made me wish I had a bigger new garden to do.  We got three bags Gardner and Bloome Harvest Supreme for the Diane project.

Pennisetum ‘Jade Princess’…gorgeous and tender


assorted echinaceas

Klipsan Beach Cottages

All we accomplished was some light deadheading and deadleafing and a bit of weeding.

The fairy door had taken a tumble…in the almost tornado of Monday, perhaps.


fixed (Allan’s photos)

Mary agreed we could cut down the rugosa rose, below, right, background.  The stems are looking ugly and it needs refreshing.

rugosa rose; we will wait till the leaves do their nice color change.


too early for fall clean up

I noticed that the Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ that usually reaches the top of the greenhouse is half that height this year.  Perhaps the sprinkler did not reach far enough into that area.

sit spot


bird bath view

What is up with the cosmos growing so tall with much greenery and no flowers?  I googled and the conclusion was too much nitrogen fertilizer.  That might make sense, because Mary does fertilize this garden, and I applied fertilizer pretty lavishly at the welcome sign, and also I tend to put a dab of fertilizer (Dr Earth all purpose or rose and flower) in each planting hole.  It paid to finally google about this cosmos problem.

The Red Barn

…just got the slightest tidying.

our audience


This fellow is especially handsome.

Diane’s garden

Allan did the mulch spreading and planting in the middle of the huge septic tank thingie.  I planted along the edge and tended to the rest of the garden. I should have taken photos and did not.  Allan did.

We can now take this project off the work list because the basics are done.

home

our neighbour Royal with his bestie, Frosty

Allan took a nap, saying that the job at Diane’s had been hard, and that it used to be easier to just jump up onto a raised bed.  I share his regret at “not getting stronger”.

Tomorrow: Without having to water, we should be able to get a Long Beach planter project done without having to rush.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 14 Sept 2017

We started at a garden just a few blocks east of us.

Mayor Mike’s garden

….with tidying, clipping some errant rose canes and some spent perennials.

Mayor Mike’s front garden

Just as we were finishing there, a parade of many old Dodge vehicles drove by down Lake Street.

Our next mission was chop the myrtles at ….

The Port of Ilwaco

before


cutting flush to the ground with our rechargeable saw


after. We will make this garden interesting again with divisions from other plants, after some rain comes.

The myrtles will grow back, and I will keep them small.

The sightline in late summer:

22 August: before pruning the myrtles


and today

While Allan pruned, I watered three garden beds.

my favourite port garden


the driveover garden

 Having decided on a midday cultural work break, we parked at the post office.

The deer have discovered the miniature rose in the post office planter.

We walked across the street to the

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

to peruse the Derby Days exhibit. You still have time to see it.

“Join the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum as we explore the history of “Derbyville” and the early years of salmon derbies, recreational fishing, and the emergence of the charter-boat fishing industry on the Long Beach Peninsula. This exhibit will be on view August 4 – October 7, 2017.”

The old Dodges were parked in the museum lot and across the street.

In the museum, we were fascinated with the old photos of the marina…

…and especially by photos showing the shoreline back when our lot was riverfront property.

The river bank is now the meander line, a ditch between us and the port parking lots.

We spent considerable time peering at the photo above, and the one below, trying to pinpoint our lot and the house that used to sit on it.

An old postcard touts the climate that was one of the reasons I moved here:

The water is no longer cheap and the summers are hotter than they used to be.

Allan enjoyed this old photo of Black Lake boating.

The salmon derby camps were along the banks of the Columbia, east of Chinook.

One of my favourite parts of the musuem is their replica street of shops.  It is being changed up with some new finds.

New school room display includes a typewriter like the one I typed a very bad novel on in high school.


tailoring shop

Allan likes the Chinook canoe:

Work called.  In case the rain did not arrive on Sunday, I wanted to get four more of my most favourite curbside gardens watered, and Allan had some hedge trimming to do.

 Port of Ilwaco

port office garden


the marina


I weeded and watered three pocket gardens…


…and the Time Enough Book garden….


…and visited my good friend Scout in the book store.


as always, good books.

I had no intention of buying a book, yet I did purchase this one.

As I walked home, I noted that the meander line ditch is completely dry.  It will soon become a stream again when the rains arrive.

by the community college annex, showing the size the California wax myrtles like to attain.

Meanwhile, Allan had pruned two escallonias down at Coho Charters.

one of them, before


and after

home

frog in a water barrel (Allan’s photo)

Allan set to his new project, removing old shakes from the shed, which, in WWII years, was an electrical repair shop for small appliances.

Apparently, the shakes were just a decorative overlay. (Allan’s photo)


Allan’s photo

I rearranged some plants on the patio, accidentally pulling a santolina out of a planted chimney pot.  While transplanting it by Devery’s driveway, I saw that Frosty had gone next door to visit his new bestie, Royal.  Devery was taking photos from her porch while I was taking photos from the driveway.

 Devery and I are both delighted by this sweet friendship, initiated by Frosty.

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

The work board has sprouted a list for fall.

The top “later” project at Diane’s, restoring the roadside garden, has to wait for a new fence.

While I struggled to get going, Allan hauled my clipped salmonberries from the bogsy woods and loaded them into the trailer.

It’s about a 200 foot drag. (Allan’s photo)

J’s garden

We began across the street. While painters are working on the house and garage, we had let the blackberries come through from the yard next door.  How did that happen so fast?

before

Allan’s photo

after

This load went to the dump.

The Depot Restaurant

The soil was damp enough so that we did not have to water.

north side of dining deck

autumnal Solidago ‘Fireworks’

Agastache ‘Mexican Giant’

Basket Case window box and planter

and another Basket Case window box and planter

We had time to do a good clipping of the escallonia that always wants to block the railway history sign.  (No photos of that project.  I was having a very hard time getting myself in gear for today.)

The Red Barn

While Allan got started on weeding and watering, I had a look at a horse.

tail brushing

“One Last Cruise”, nickname Cruise, named because he was the last foal of his breeder.

That was Mr. Amy with Cruise, and here comes Amy her ownself.

Allan’s photo

Diane’s garden

I then walked across the field to Diane’s garden.

My good friend Misty awaits her belly rub.

Oh, look, fence posts!  Looks like the fence is going to go up sooner than I thought.  I hope we can remove the strip of sod that will be outside the fence; that would be very hard to maintain.  Of course, it will be harder to remove the sod edge once the fence is in.

Holly peeking out from the porch. Soon she will have a big place to play.

Basket Case Greenhouse

I was on a quest for Lavender ‘Hidcote Blue’, but I had bought them all last time.  I will check at The Planter Box next week.  It was still pleasant to visit with Darrell and Roxanne..

Basket Case

The Dodge truck display that Basket Case put together for Rod Run.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

schmoozing with owner Darrel

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We did a lot of deadheading and cutting back of rose canes.  I made it so this hydrangea shows again:

A before and after would have been dramatic. Rugosa rose with a rambling red rose threaded through it.

Allan pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ to make a better view through the deer fence.

before

after

I’m going to ask if I can do a severe pruning of that big rugosa rose later on.  (Mary was away for the week, and I did not have time today, anyway.)

the east gate

gate detail; the glass ball was my idea!

It is sad that my former partner, Robert, got post polio syndrome and could no longer do heavy work like welding.  He was so talented at it.

east gate

He called this one the Fish Gate.

south gate

sit spot with Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’…and a sprout, in the foreground.

seeds of tree peony

The leaves of the peony always get crispy and ugly in the late summer, so I pick more off every week.

ugly tree peony leaves (Allan’s photo); I wonder if this is normal or if they are diseased?

Allan found that the fairy door had gone missing!

home regained

Billardia longiflora

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’ (Allan’s photo)

cottages on the ridge

Long Beach

We decided that we had time to get a head start on Long Beach tasks by tidying Veterans Field.  On the way, we saw a new garden at a cottage that I always admire.

“Kite Flyers Only” Cottage

The Long Beach Peninsula could have an amazing cottage tour of its own if enough people could be found to open their cottages to strangers.

Veterans Field flag pavilion garden

Vet Field corner garden, cosmos (Allan’s photos)

cosmos and eryngium

home

While Allan mowed the tiny lawn in the J’s back garden, I somehow got a burst of energy after watering the tomatoes in the greenhouse and decided to rescue a container of bamboo from being overrun with hops and honeysuckle.

Allan’s shed repair photo from two days ago shows the before.

tonight: rescued bamboo

this much debris! J9 wants some hops for decorating.

Skooter

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 9 September 2017

Cannon Beach Cottage and Garden Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum

1972 Cottage

from the program:  This house was built in 1972.  There have been a few changes to the house, including remodeling the kitchen, bathroom, new floors, windows, the deck and the skylight.  And interesting feature is that the deck is built around the tree.  The homeowner’s kids have enjoyed walking to the beach and playing in the sand; the pictures in the home tell many stories.  The owner was the vice principal and principal of Seaside School for many years.

Allan’s photo

over the inside of the front door

high school theatre productions by the cottage owner

bunk bed book nook

interlude

The house just to the south of our next destination had a beachy garden.

the house next door

We overheard one of the docents say that this part of north Cannon Beach was hit hard in the 1964 tsunami.  You can read more about that here.  We could see that the estuary was just a couple of blocks to the south.  It was disconcerting to imagine a tsunami flowing up the street. Allan found a map that shows, in orange, the low lying area where these cottages sit.

1924 Cottage

darling dining nook with view of that beachy next door garden

reminds me of our friends Don and Jenna

kitchen tiles

on a bedroom dresser

bedside reading

I have read this book.

Must read this one.

I was smitten with this cottage and its books.  Of all the cottages today, it was my favourite.

And it has a clawfoot tub (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

back garden

outdoor shower (Allan’s photo)

by the door to the garage loft

Allan went up to the garage loft, not me.

nautical things table in the loft

west garden

Allan’s photo

We walked half a block north to look for the farmhouse and barn.

We think this is the farmhouse.

And this has to be the remodeled barn.

interlude

across the street

I would like this. It is probably only $300K or so.

Next: the last two homes of the tour.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »