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Archive for the ‘fall clean up’ Category

Thursday, 21 December 2017

The night had been just below freezing.  I woke early to a white frosty world, poked my camera out the south cat door for an unscreened photo of frost on the grass…

…and went back to sleep for three more hours.  When I awoke, I suggested that we go do the post-frost clean up, in hope that finally the frost had put the gardens to sleep.

We began a few blocks east at

Mike’s garden,

which we have referred to till now as Mayor Mike’s garden.  He is retiring as mayor at the end of 2017.

The sun was bright, the air cold, and the ground just lightly frozen.

Pieris promising spring

pale pink hesperantha blooming on the west side

salmon pink hesperantha blooming on the north side

pulling spent hesperantha along the front path

Allan raked.

Anchorage Cottages

Some days back, we drove in and right back out of the Anchorage parking lot because I could see the chrysanthemums by the office were still blooming.  And today they were STILL blooming.

Chrysanths that will not quit.

Today, I showed Jody, the housekeeper, who also does some gardening, how to just cut them to the ground when and if they ever brown off (which they will…).  We are not going to keep returning to check on two chrysanthemums.  I also showed her that she could cut the Melianthus if we have a hard enough freeze to make it ugly.

Melianthus major in the center courtyard

frozen birdbath (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo: In early spring, we will cut back this sprawling plant even if it does not get frozen, just to shape it up.

Long Beach

My mind had been on the one big Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I had left untrimmed.  Surely it would be frozen by now? But no.

Allan’s photos

Frost could make the California poppies ugly, too. At least they are small.

It has been so mild that the Rozannes we cut back early this year have put out rosettes of new leaves.

It got cut back anyway, because we are not going to keep checking on it through January and I don’t want to think about a potential blackened heap of frozen leaves later on.

An anemone was already blooming in Veterans Field.

Allan’s photo

a wreath in Veterans Field (Allan’s photo)

We did some cutting back in Fifth Street Park, of a pineapple sage, some Verbena bonariensis, and a bit of the sprawling Melianthus.

pulling some spent hesperantha flowers

as tidy as its going to get till at least late January

Once upon a time, the scrim of unclipped catmint along the front, above, would have greatly bothered me.  For some reason, this year I think it looks interesting against the dry flower heads of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’…or maybe it was just that my hands were so cold.

Primroses (cowslips) were already blooming under a street tree.

I can feel exactly how it will feel to go back to work in late January or early February, and the prospect feels ok.  My only problem is that I have gotten pretty much nowhere on my indoor winter projects.

We celebrated the true end of the work year with coffee, warmth, and Pink Poppy Bakery treats at Abbracci Coffee Bar.

Abbracci co-owner Tony

We and another regular customer each got to take home one of the Christmas centerpieces.. very nice, since we never got around to putting up a tree, and later the flowers can go in my wonderful compost bins.

Abbracci tree and centerpieces

Ilwaco Timberland Library

We had some books to pick up.

at the library entrance

deep shade behind the wall

In the library

As expected, I got quite a pile of books, despite my original staycation plan for re-reading books on my own bookshelves.  Maybe that will wait till sometime when I am homebound for one reason or another.

a new batch, and the previous batch is not done yet

We had brought home a bucket of Abbracci coffee grounds and enough clean compost to add a wheelbarrow’s worth to my bins.  As I chopped it into small pieces and turned some from one bin to another at dusk, I did not mind the cold at all.

I have a compost obsession.

All the work got erased from the work side of the board, as did “Call Accountant”.  I had found an email address for the accountant we want, so I emailed her on the way home this afternoon.  I won’t have to call unless we don’t hear back in my preferred medium for anything business related (email, text, Facebook messaging, anything but a business phone call!).  (Carol, this does not mean you and Bill!)

a joyous sight

Salt Pub

After dark, we attended a Salty Talk at Salt Pub.

“Join Jim Sayce, historian and Executive Director of the Pacific County Economic Development Council, in a SALTY Talks presentation, “Reading the Land: Forensic Ecology” exploring the changes in the local landscape over time. Jim will show us how to recognize the subtle clues that can help find the original or historic landscape of a site within the bones of the built environment.”

Allan’s photo

delicious burger with salad subbed for fried (Allan’s photo)

window reflection

night marina

More boats than one used to decorate with lights.  The winter storms and wet weather caused too many electrical problems and so that pretty tradition ended just a few years back. We were happy to see one or two boats still carrying it on.

The Salt holiday tree

The lecture was well attended for one so close to the holidays.

Museum director Betsy Millard introduces the lecture (Allan’s photo)

Jim has a good collection of photos to illustrate how you can see the underlay of history.  For example, a line of trees representing old fence lines (where the trees grew up under the fence and the fence eventually disappeared):

He showed our changing views due to accretion of the beach (in some places half a mile wider than it used to be) and the growth of beach pines, which were not there a century ago.   Many beach trails were begun over 100 years ago and have simply been lengthened by trodding feet as the beach itself moved westward.

Allan captured some of the interesting old photos:

The “elephant rocks” used to be out in the surf, as an old photo showed, and are now well inland of Waikiki Beach.

rocks once out in the surf…

and now on land

An old highway has gone back to nature by the new highway 101.  Through a layer of grass and moss, the yellow line of the old highway occasionally shows through.

Jim Sayce

Jim’s laser pointer was not working.

The old and new photos pleased and fascinated us.

Jim’s blog, circa 2011 and before, is here.

It is now time for five weeks of true staycation.

 

 

 

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In real time, we interrupt the narrative flow to wish those of you who celebrate Christmas a happy day.  The blog still running five days behind is keeping it from going on winter hiatus.

Wednesday, 20 December 2017

I had a late start because of getting a solid eight hours of sleep for the first time in awhile.  By noon, the weather looked to be a windless 45 degrees and I decided I would do some weeding.

the rain gauge from last night

Skooter on the roof

Frosty was watching Skooter from below the arbour.

Frosty went up to the cat door platform and they exchanged looks.

This is part of Skooter’s route to and from the roof:

I clipped some catmint in the front garden.  That must have released some scent; all of a sudden both Skooter and Frosty converged upon it.

I thought to myself that I had made a mistake in leaving the much less sunny front yard for weeding now.  I’d be warmer if I had done the front garden during the milder days and saved the sunny south side for chilly days.

so much warmer back here where I already weeded

In Allan’s garden, a tall mahonia catches the sun.

In the front garden, east side, the big libertia is all of a sudden on the move.  I will dig up these smaller ones and take them to the droughty gardens at the port.  I might also remove the rather tatty large one and replace with a smaller one or replant somewhere in the back garden.

In different areas, I have four large swathes of epimedium that should be sheared back so the early flowers show.  Googling tells me I can and maybe should wait till February.

pieris backed with epimedium

OH, I see something that might interest Mr. Tootlepedal.

I don’t know much about such things, but that must be a lichen or a fungus…Maybe a lichen IS a fungus.  I am uninformed.  With a hardy fuchsia for good measure.

I was glad to be in the front garden when Seaside gardener Pam drove by, on her way to the port with her mom, Harriet. They stopped for a brief visit.

Pam and Harriet

After they left, I began weeding the shady part of the garden.  It wasn’t as hard as I had thought it would be.  My hands stopped hurting from the cold and I made great progress.

shady front garden, before

The bed to the right was a solid groundcover mass of baby dwarf fireweeds that peeled off in sheets.

Billardia longiflora

Billardia longiflora berries

As the sun set, I could feel the ground starting to freeze and the weeding became slightly more difficult.

after, with hands to cold to pick up the last of the debris

I went indoors at dusk. After hearing the sounds of raking, I looked out the front window. I do think that Allan had raked this path.

I was able to erase the front middle and east beds from the work list, especially since I downgraded the heading from “good weeding” to just weeding.  Now I can think about whether or not I am going to get a big pile of mulch.  (The problem with said big pile is that it will block the garage.)

Skooter had worn himself out with his roof escapades and/or a catmint high.  (Catmint, Nepeta, is not the same as catNIP.  It doesn’t make cats as high as catnip does for some, but they still enjoy it in a mild way.)

naptime

I got a most pleasing Christmas card from Jo and Bob, who you might remember as former clients of ours till they moved away last year.  I loved seeing their new house, on a lake.

Longtime blog followers may like to see this.

And I got teary-eyed over this photo of my good friend Coco.  I miss all three of them!

lovable Coco!

Tonight: The treat of the season finale of Survivor and some more Black Cat Bookshop mystery.

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Monday, 18 December 2017

At the Ilwaco Post Office, Allan delivered our card:

inside, Allan’s sketch

He saw a cute dog waiting outside:

The postal staff told him that this is the busiest day of the year.  In our small town, we have to get our mail at the post office (no home delivery).  I remember in Seattle that the busy holidays would have lines out the door.

busiest day

We all have to go there for our mail. They should get more than two cards!

When the rain stopped in the early afternoon, I went outside with the intention of raking some of last year’s debris out of the garden and chopping it into the compost bins.

We’d had this much rain.

After deposting a wheelbarrow load of debris into a compost bin, I was inspired to dig up an ornamental grass that was now languishing in the west bed too close to Leycesteria ‘Jealousy’.

I gave that up for a moment and decided to move a pink and white old rose that had become lost and invisible in the middle of the bed.

This particular old rose, maybe Rosa ‘Mundi’ used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery, a former job of ours (that is now handled by Todd, brother of artist Eric Wiegardt).  I removed the rose from the gallery for two reasons.  First, the deer discovered that garden so every year the rose got eaten to a nub.  Second, I planted it when the building was pink, and the rose color did not go with the latest gallery color, a pale sort of pea green.

Back when the gallery was pink and blue:

In 2007 or so, the gallery became a sort of faint purplish colour (not lavender) that still worked with the pink theme.

In 2009, it became a pale green and most of the pink theme did not look right anymore.

So the sad deer-chomped rose came home to live with me.

Now it has been moved to a spot where some gold Helenium and gold foliage shrubs are no doubt going to clash with the pink and white flowers.  I can pick the roses for bouquets if the combination is too painful.  This placement will enable me to watch the rose for rampant blackspot and to decide if it is worth keeping.

new home for a rose (where the soil is most ruched up)

Allan walked out the back door just when I was heading into the garage for the heavy pick to get out the big grass.  Lucky me, unlucky Allan.  He agreed to help me by hoiking out the grass and digging out two clumps of boring orange daylily and one big clump of grass infested shasta daisies.

An extra tall Boltonia asteroides went into the middle of the bed. The grass went toward the north edge of the garden, in the hole the boltonia came out of,  to balance another white and green variegated grass. A bit of shasta daisy went where the daylily came out, and Allan helped me do a better job of standing up the columnar apple I had transplanted into the west garden bed not long ago.

before

after

It was a tremendously satisfying work session and solved several problems that had been bothering me all summer.

After dark, which comes at 4:30 now, I read the shortest book of my reading year:

At 31 pages, this darling book is to be a gift for Dave and Melissa (who I am sure don’t read this blog, so don’t spill the beans).  They have a nice flock of chickens.  I read Lovgreen’s book in the 1970s and have always remembered its charm.

I have requested her memoir, As Far As I Can Remember, via interlibrary loan.

In 1982, I visited a friend who was renting a small house on Bainbridge Island.  Imagine my amazement and thrill when it turned out to be Minnie’s old house.  How I wish I had taken pictures of the house and landscape… Those were the days when film was precious and blogging was a thing of the far future.

All I have to show of that day is this photo of me and my significant other, Bryan, sitting in Minnie’s house.

1982

Today, in the evening, Allan wrapped all the presents.  He does a good, neat job.  My wrapped presents come out like bundles.  Some friends found this endearing, or so they said; this year, only Montana Mary got the bundled style of wrapping.

I can now show you how perfectly the little truck I got at NIVA green goes with a Christmas card from The Card Lady.

Tomorrow, much excitement awaits because we will go to see the new Star Wars movie with Dave and Melissa.

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Friday, 15 December 2017

When we’d learned there was to be a rally against ICE deportations in the afternoon, interfering with my at-home goals, I had decided that we should try to polish off some of the leftover work beforehand.

We began at the Ilwaco boatyard garden, planting about six good sized starts of Solidago ‘Fireworks’ in empty spaces along the two block long garden.

boatyard garden looking south

planting

The last of the old cosmos got pulled, and I am calling this garden done for 2017.

crab pot tree at the end of the garden (Allan’s photo)

In Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park, I planted two clumps of the solidago (a short and well behaved clumping goldenrod) while Allan snipped a few stray brown stems from nearby planters.

Fifth Street Park

Narcissi already blooming in Fifth Street Park

We cruised up to the Anchorage Cottages, thinking we could finally clip back the chrysanthemums and agyranthemums.  Our summery weather had them still blooming, so we did not even get out of the van, just turned around and left.

At The Red Barn Arena, we planted a couple of pieces of the goldenrod and pulled out one dead erysimum.

a wee bit of weeding

Midge in her fine coat.

Next door at Diane’s garden, the remaining annuals still looked too lush to pull.  I left a note suggesting she just cut back anything in those pots that looks tatty later.  I can’t keep going back to check on them every week; that is not cost effective for either of us.

the annuals that will not die

I look forward to many bulbs in this raised septic garden.

We now had an hour and a half left before the rally, with no more work to do.  This called for a stop at NIVA green.

In NIVA green, with Heather’s assistant, Wes, and Heather Ramsay herself

a peek through the doorway into the magic workshop (Allan’s photo)

Heather had put out some new lamps:

I fell hard for this double decker nightlight and got it for myself, even though buying presents for myself was not on the agenda.

This red truck is going to go beautifully with a “Card Lady’ card of a red truck with a Christmas tree in the back.

After NIVA, we spent 40 minutes relaxing at Abbracci Coffee Bar.  I am quite annoyed that the bright summer-like sun blurred out my focus on the Christmas tree in their window.  Trust me, it was such a pretty sight.  Let’s say it is like a water colour.

an elegant pattern on my latte

Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery is retiring her business to become a personal chef for an artists’ retreat.   Abbracci will be the only local place to get her baked goods, like this delicately flavoured Swedish Traveling Cake.  Elixir Coffee up in South Bend will also have her treats.

Abbracci art (Allan’s photo)

In Abbracci, I had such a helpful conversation with owners Tony and Bernardo and one of their patrons. I was asked (not in these exact words) about the severe clean up of the narrow garden to the south of their building: Would the plants come back? I had dug up lots of volunteer blue scabiosa and other perennials in an attempt to start over. I told them that I try to rein in my “messy gardening style” and was thinking of a much tidier planting there. Turns out all three of them love the wild and tangly style. It made the happy to hear that I could so easily make that garden bed messy again.

Finally, it was time for the rally.  This time, the organizer had decided to split the event between Long Beach and Ocean Park.  I had kvetched about it making the groups too small, and indeed, the rally began with only three of us.  For new readers, here is the background again:

“[Long Beach Peninsula Resident] Rosas was arrested when going to Okie’s early in the morning of November 27. When he asked why he was being arrested, ICE officers said “My supervisor asked me to come find you because of what appeared in the newspaper.” We want to speak out against this arrest and on the attack on his rights to free speech.

The original story in the Seattle Times (my home town paper) is here, and well worth reading.

The follow up, after the arrest of Rosas, is here.

He appears to have been sought out because he spoke (under his nickname) to the Seattle Times.  ICE did not detain him earlier, even though he asked them why they took his family and not him.

This story has drawn the attention of the Mexican consulate and has been picked up by national and international news, including the Washington Post and The Independent, UK.

Here is a link to the gofundme where you can contribute, to help him and his family, who were deported to Mexico.  (His children are American citizens, who went with their mother.)

Today, when we first arrived, we thought there was no one else, and we waited in our van for a bit.  Then we saw one lone figure arrive; it was Ann, who had also been waiting in her vehicle.

Allan’s photo

We settled into our rallying as the wind picked up and the rain arrived.  Allan took all the rally photos but one.  My hands were so cold that I didn’t even think of getting out the camera.

Only once were we heckled with a “WOOO Trump!” from a young fellow driving a foreign made car; the rest of the interaction from passing vehicles was all waves and honks and thumbs up.

Everyne at the Ocean Park rally point bailed out when the rain came.  I was not about to stop for rain; I know darn well that Rosas himself worked on the bay in all sorts of weather.

MaryBeth saw my one real-time photo on Facebook and came to join us.  Four felt much more effective to me than three.

The rain finally stopped and out came a rainbow behind us.

Our good friend Susie was just at that moment returning from an out of town trip, too late to join us..

our Susie

We endured till 4:15 PM.

Allan and I could see a glorious pink sky and so we drove to the west end of Sid Snyder drive for a better look.

looking west

Allan’s photo, to the south

We nabbed a few Christmas lights photos on the way home.

Ilwaco City Hall

Ocean Beach Hospital, Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

Ocean Beach Hospital (Allan’s photo)

Crab pots on First Avenue

We had a mere 45 minutes turn around time at home.  I was able to erase Diane’s garden and the Red Barn from the work board.  The other jobs are simply going to have to wait until we have a hard frost for their final check up…if we have such a thing this winter.

We soon left again for our weekly North Beach Garden Gang dinner at OleBob’s Café at the Port.

on the way: The Crab Pot Tree

The four us us (Tangly Cottage Gardening and Sea Star Gardening) were joined this week by our good friend Ed of Strange Landscaping.

In the entry hallway: Pins show where visitors have come from.

a local sea captain

This week’s specials:

a beef empanada

the view

south window reflection shows the inside, the outdoor dining deck, and the Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Co Christmas star

Dave, Ed, Allan, Melissa, with Lynn and Chef Laura in the background

Paella was another special of the night.

Allan’s fresh caught rockfish with Laura’s chimichurri sauce and a “perfectly done” baked potato

flan for dessert

We stayed till after closing, when I was so happy to sit with Laura’s dog, Pancho.

I so much want a nice little dog.  Pancho is such a good boy.

I suddenly felt ever so exhausted.  Yet tomorrow is another busy, not at-home day.

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Thursday, 14 December 2017

Finally, I got eight hours of sleep.  Unfortunately, after being up till all hours watching meteors, that meant a late start to the weeding day.

In the front garden, I partially weeded the beds from east to west in order to plant crocuses, so I can count those beds as almost done.

If I had not clipped a lot of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ in Long Beach town, I bet it would still be blooming there like it is in my garden.  This summer weather in winter is surprising.  Usually, my blog would be on a partial winter hiatus now because of inactivity.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ in mid December

a stand of borage still covered with stars of blue flowers

You can float the blue flowers on a soup or use them in salads.  Just carefully pull the blue stars off the fuzzy part.

Today was a bit chillier and slightly more seasonal. Skooter helped me again.

between me and my crocuses

With the front garden packed with new crocuses, I returned to weeding the west bed so that I could plant some down the center there.  Allan walked by at just the right moment (for me, probably the wrong moment for him), and I asked him to remove a nest of Solidago ‘Fireworks’ mixed with rampant creeping buttercup.  If he had not, I would have run out of daylight and been unable to erase “west bed” from the weeding list.

creeping buttercup mess, before (Allan’s photo)

Skooter (Allan’s photo)

Once I broke up the dug up mass of this medium height clumping goldenrod, I ended up with a surprising amount of good clumps that I can plant around Long Beach and at the boatyard. Today and Tuesday, two members of the Peninsula Gardeners Facebook group had come to pick up the  hardy fuchsia pieces that Allan had dug up two days ago.  It’s a pity that I did not have clumps of the excellent goldenrod to share at that time.

Skooter inspects the job (Allan’s photo)

after, with crocuses placed and Skooter enjoying the new clearing

I filled the area with a Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer” that had been lost in the middle of the garden bed.

at dusk, west bed weeded and crocused up

All the paths are a mess now and need a good raking (or mowing).  Allan has been coming along behind me with a rake, doing some of the tidying, and he ran the string trimmer all along the edges.

As the light faded, I got the last 50 crocuses planted in three beds around the campfire area.

Danger Tree bed

two of the three big beds I’ve weeded this week

dusk

sunset next door

across the street

I still have not even put up our own Christmas tree, and I have a feeling it may not happen this year, unless the weather becomes properly wintry very soon.

I was able to do some satisfying erasures, and I changed the “Good weeding” to just “weeding”.  I have to admit it has not been a perfect job.

Tomorrow, rain and some wind may return, and we must go to a late afternoon political rally, and so we might as well try, if the weather is not too bad, to accomplish a few of the “post frost check ups”.  Without frost, I will just call them pre-holiday checks ups.  I long to clear the board of work and be fully on staycation.  Maybe if “call accountant” is the last thing on the work side of the board, I will make myself find a new accountant (our nice local one retired) before it is too late.

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Wednesday, 13 December 2017

My sleep has been poor again.  Last night was because I was so thrilled about the Alabama election and because I woke up early afraid something had gone wrong with the results.  (It has not.)

We began by mailing assorted holiday cards and packages at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

post office tree

A quick pop into the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum across the street netted more holiday photos.

in the museum gift shop

It does not feel very Christmasy at home because the weather has been so summery.

hardy fuchsias still in bloom

I finished weeding the east bed to the gentle strains of the Alabamian classic, Tuxedo Junction, the song that is still stuck in my head.  “Boop bop, boop bop, boop bop boop boop bop, way down south, in Birmingham, way down south, in Alabam’…we dance the night away.”

still weeding the east bed.

done!

By two thirty, I had finished that big bed and started on the west one.  My goal was to get the most visible inner edge done so that I could plant bulbs.

along the west bed, before

45 minutes later

I got 100 miniature narcissi and a quantity of crocus planted, yet did not achieve my bulb planting mission because by dark, I had 275 crocus left to go in.

sunset over the port

Allan had gone over the river to shop for groceries.  I may have planted some crocus in HIS garden while he was out of the way.

I thought the mixed crocus were mixed in every bag, only to find, when I put my reading specs on, that I had planted ALL the ‘Pickwick’ crocus in one area.  Most annoying.  The varieties I planted are ‘Pickwick’, ‘Jeanne D’Arc’, ‘Vanguard’, ‘Golden Yellow’ and ‘Flower Record.’

This good weather is hampering my staycation reading.  I’ve been picking away at the same book for a week now.  I thought for sure I would finish it tonight, but did not.  With just fifty pages to go, we instead went outside at 1 AM to look for meteors. I was skeptical of seeing any (because I thought the bright street lights and assorted nearby blazing white security lights would fade out the stars) until I read on Facebook that an acquaintance in Long Beach had just seen 49.  If only we had gone out a little earlier!  It was a great thrill to see 15-20 meteors in the celestial show. THIS was the night when we should have had a campfire.

The stars were so clear that Allan even got a photo…unfortunately, with no meteors.

You can see Orion’s belt, where much of the meteor action was. They were also appearing on all sides.

Some thoughts on the book I have almost finished:

I already know that I will be giving it two of of five stars on Goodreads.   Most of the self-deprecating, droll memoir amused and pleased me greatly, but the book is sullied by Whitcomb’s casual and shocking racism toward the black residents of his neighbourhood, and to a lesser extent toward other races.  I sincerely hope that since the 1990s, he has become more enlightened.  What a shame, because otherwise I so much enjoyed his self-deprecating and witty style.

Why couldn’t it all be more like this?  (Beefy was his dog.)

Despite my disgruntlement at the book’s fatal flaw, I am immediately ordering its sequel, Letters from Lotusland, irresistibly described as “a roller coaster of self-pity, vaunting and failed ambition, jealousy, bathos and pathos, culminating in a Big Dream.” I hope to find that he is more enlightened by 2008.

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 12 December 2017

berries on a Fuchsia procumbens that Todd gave me

I finished removing grass from the patch of Louisiana iris at the end of the center bed, and started on the weeding of the big east bed.

Skooter helped.

almost but not quite tipping a birdbath

Allan affixed an old mailbox, that once served at my parents’ retirement home near Yelm, to the end of the compost bins.  I will use it to put small garden tools in instead of letting them lay around.  Or so I think.

I got distracted by rearranging my faux flint top wall so that I have a walk through all the way along the back of the compost.  Alison of the Bonney Lassie blog is absolutely right with her comment that the best thing about this compost re-do project was getting a work path beside the greenhouse.

 

I still have weeding to do along the east side of the east bed.  At least I got to erase the center bed from the work list.

Meanwhile, Allan had gone to the Azure Salon at the end of our street for a haircut.

Azure Salon Christmas tree

and an Azure staff member

Christmas stockings for the beauticians

On a short scenic drive after his appointment, Allan saw cranberry bog work north of Black Lake.

And checked up on the yacht club.

He wanted to get you a photo of the white swans who are now in residence on the lake.  They must have been on an outing of their own.

I applaud myself for getting my cards written this evening and my gifts for Montana Mary all packed and ready to mail.

Some cards by “The Card Lady”, Sandhi Burk

In between writing each card, I anxiously checked the Alabama special election.  My mood soared, and then crashed, and then soared again, culminating with tears of joy when the Democrat, Doug Jones, won, against what seemed to be steep odds. I later heard that the sister of one the young girls who were killed in the KKK church bombing in 1963, a crime which Doug Jones successfully prosecuted decades later, was able to vote for him. It gives me hope that there will be continued progress in undoing this country’s current racist, classist, embarrassing, and downright creepy regime.

All day and for  the next two days, this song was happily running through my mind:

“Way down south in Birmingham
I mean south in Alabam’
There’s an old place where people go
To dance the night away
They all drive or walk for miles
To get jive that southern style
It’s an old jive that makes you want
To dance till break of day
It’s a junction where the town folks meet
At each function in a tux they greet you
Come on down, forget your care
Come on down, you’ll find me there
So long town, I’m heading for
Tuxedo Junction now”

What a joyous day.  I am sure there was much dancing and rejoicing among the good folks of Alabam’.

Erskine Hawkins, composer of Tuxedo Junction

 

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