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Posts Tagged ‘Shelburne Hotel’

Thursday, 11 October 2018

Long Beach

At last we had time to do a project that had been weighing on my mind: dig out the wire vine, Muehlenbeckia axillaris, from the planter in front of Stormin’ Norman’s.

I planted it years ago, thinking it was a cute little trailing house plant that would not make it through the winter.  After a very few years, it had done this:

before: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

It had been cute and then had gone suddenly berserk.

We dug it out, but did not take all the soil out because we thought we could control any wire vine that popped out from pieces of root. (And oh, how we had tried to sift through and get all those pieces.)

Today:

before

The wire vine has returned throughout the planter despite semi-diligent attempts at control.

We were incredibly lucky during the digging out stage to get a parking spot right next to the planter.

Allan moves the trailer closer in.

such a lucky spot!

Before:

Allan’s photo

cleaning the perennials

After all the plants were out, as Allan removed the soil in the wire vine planter, I pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from the next planter.

before

after

Most merchants don’t like tall plants in front of their shops. The Wind World Kites guy loves the crocosmia and jokes that he now has nowhere to hide.

After much digging and removing all the soil and the tattered years-old landscape fabric that separates soil from gravel, we found roots down IN the gravel.  This is ominous.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We hauled the heavy debris to city works and dumped it in an inhospitable spot and returned with buckets of the last of the mulch pile and some landscape fabric from the works shop.  It was utterly exhausting, heavy work, especially because this time we had to park half a block away and haul everything

My back was panging, so I answered some garden questions while standing straight against a wall.  Part of the job is to be friendly to tourists.

The woman in blue was from England and had lived there till 1958.  I asked her if she had heard of garden writer Marion Cran.  She had not.

with new fabric to keep the soil from migrating into the rock

I had had rather a stroke of genius; we also brought the last two hanging basket innards and used that soil to extend what we had.

Allan’s photos

putting plants back in

Allan deadheaded a block worth of planters while I re planted.

Allan’s photo

Upon his return, the planter was done.  Many bulbs were also replanted.

Last week:

Stormin’ Norman’s

Today, after:

I was able to salvage all the perennials by carefully inspecting their roots.  I will be watching closely for any sign of wire vine emerging from them; if it does, out they will come.

Across the street is a planter I quite like (even though the matching santolina was stolen).

I have enjoyed Cosmos ‘Xanthos’.

pink gaura

I used the pink gaura to replace the bad agastaches in the Agastache Catastrophe (a batch with diseased leaves).  The gaura has been good and has bloomed longer, with no deadheading, than the agastache does.  I will use it again next year, along with perhaps the shorter white one, ‘So White’.

colourful Long Beach

After our project, we deadheaded and tidied a few more planters.

chrysanthemums

a rogue white flower stem

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and yellow chrysanths

pink chrysanthemums starting to fade

I love the chrysanthemums that have perennialized in some of the planters.  They take up too much room to have them in every one.

The Shelburne Hotel

We had time to tidy up the back garden at the Shelburne.  Chef Casey had found akebia fruits on the south fence.  I sought them out under cover of the vine.

the akebia vine that I planted years ago

akebia fruits…I saved one to try out but I have forgotten to do so.

(I did try it a couple of days later.  The insides have a sweet pulp that is so full of seeds that there is little food to offer.)

Asian pears on the west fence

Someone had filled the bird bath with bean seeds. (Allan’s photo)

The beans in pots are well past their prime.

I picked off some moldy old beans….

…and then realized I remembered the hotel’s Halloween event and realized I should leave them till after Halloween.   I then decided to leave the old Joe Pye Weed and some other plants to add a spookier ambiance to the front garden.

spooky Joe Pye weed

“Get ready to sit, sip, and talk to the spirits at the Shelburne Hotel. Will be having Chariot reading Tarot cards by appointment (starting at 6pm on 10/26), Adrift Distillers Amaro release (10/27 from 5pm-7pm), seasonal cuisine, and cocktails that represents the spirits at the hotel.

Will be playing the Shining in the Inglenook both nights as well.

COSTUMES ENCOURAGED.

So join us for our haunted gathering at the Shelburne. Dine and drink with the ghost…maybe even say hello?”

The Shelburne’s sister hotel, Adrift, suggests something about a ghost in the garden!

Hmmm.  I’m not saying whether or not I have ever seen Annie May in the garden.

front garden, looking north

and south

Halloween is a good reason to leave the long, draping wisteria till November before a preliminary pruning.

We rewarded ourselves for an exhausting day with a tasty meal and drink in the Shelburne pub.

As diners arrived at the pub, Brian O’ Connor began to sing, as he does every Thursday.  You can sit in the living room to listen and dine, or sit in the pub with the music as ambiance.

His deep and distinctive voice has an emotional quality that draws a regular audience on Thursday nights.

We heard part of the performance during our relaxing meal.

chop salad with fried chicken, fish and chips, cranberry cosmo

The bartender and I agreed that even though we are not usually fans of fried chicken, the version offered at the pub is delectable.  (I get it as a side on the salad.)

so good

fish and chips (Allan’s photo)

My favourite dessert on the peninsula these days is the pub’s cheesecake tart with blackberry topping.

On the way home, we checked out some Halloween decorations in Ilwaco.

Lake Street

Spruce Street

Lake Street (Pirate Lucy Dagger’s house)

We have accomplished all our little work board projects other than mulching.

accomplishments still don’t include the indoor at home projects left over from last winter

I enjoyed the partial emptiness for a moment before adding Bulb Time.

That list is even missing two small job.

Tomorrow, the bulbs come and the sorting begins, a rather dreaded task that hurts my brain.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 3 October 2018

One of my Eryngium giganteum (Miss Willmott’s Ghost) is going to bloom.  I wish it would have waited till next year.

Miss Willmott jumping the gun

The very big spider had a meal.

I had organized the day around being home to meet some out of town blog readers who were passing through in the afternoon.

Long Beach

We worked some more on straggly Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and other tired plants in the planters.

police station planter

Police Station last week

today

I hope I will be able to get my mitts on the six planters that remain hanging about town, two of them here on the police station, for my compost.

cosmos by the stoplight

santolina ready to be clipped…not today

The planter with wire vine (below) needs to be completely dug out.  I might not have enough mulch left in my Soil Energy pile to fill it back up again.  This time, ALL the soil must go.  Two years ago, we thought we could sift the roots out.  Nope.

Muehlenbeckia axillaris up in everthing

When I planted it, I thought it was a cute little house plant that would last one summer.

This is what it wants to do:

before, three years ago: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

Cosmos ‘Cupcake’ in Lewis and Clark Square

Pacific Tree Frog in Lewis and Clark Square planter

Some planters in sheltered spots still have excellent looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’

my favourite planter by Dennis Company

windier planter by Dennis Co parking lot, before

On the way through town to our next job, The Red Barn, we saw one of the Red Barn horses and rider and good dog heading for the beach.

Allan’s photo

Soon Amy and a friend from The Red Barn rode by.

Allan’s photo

We pretty much skipped the Red Barn garden today; rain had taken care of everything.

At the Red Barn

Still no Cosmo the barn cat to be seen on our short garden check up….

Diane’s garden

In Diane’s garden, we managed to get the deadheading done in 45 minutes.

roadside garden, a nerve-wracking deadheading job

a peaceful moment

Allan deadheaded the raised box garden.

The nasturtium is pale yellow ‘Moonlight’, because Diane likes soft colours.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at home

We got home in time to offload the compost debris and then to spend some time with Debbie and Alan, who stopped by on their way to Cannon Beach.  Debbie and her sister Dawn read this blog daily, and are good commenters, which all bloggers much appreciate.

me and Debbie and a bouquet for their room in Cannon Beach

garden touring

We learned that before his career as a scientist, Alan had been a guitarist in a series of Northwest rock bands.

I found online an old photo of a band that predated one called Shiloh.

Debbie and Alan brought us a little birdbath for which Debbie had sought a good home.

(right) at home for now in the cat garden, destined for the fire circle area

Allan’s photo

Dawn sent this beautiful plate, based on the book The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady, a book that I have and love.

The stanza around the edge is part of a long poem by Jean Ingelow.

An empty sky, a world of heather,
Purple of foxglove, yellow of broom;
We two among them wading together,
Shaking out honey, treading perfume.

Crowds of bees are giddy with clover,
Crowds of grasshoppers skip at our feet,
Crowds of larks at their matins hang over,
Thanking the Lord for a life so sweet.

Thank you!

I learned that Dawn was probably the mystery woman who had met our friend, gardener Prissy at The Waves in Cannon Beach after reading about her on this blog!

Alan and Debbie went on their way to a three day vacation.  Allan and I got back to work.

We had considered returning to the boatyard.  A chilly little wind had suddenly come up, and the shelter of the Shelburne Hotel seemed much more appealing.

The Depot Restaurant

I remembered that we needed to deadhead at the Depot (and water the window boxes).

north side of the dining deck

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

in one of the window boxes

The Shelburne Hotel

Allan checked the pots on the second story decks.

the middle deck

We continued with some fall clean up cutting back and cosmos removal.  I made the big decision to remove all but one of the sweet pea tangles.

sweet pea on its way out

Three clumps of peonies in the garden had been planted too deeply sometime in the past.  Allan lifted them all and grouped them together.

Allan’s photo

just one left now

looking north

Have I ever mentioned that the front garden is on the east side? So it does not get all day sunshine.

looking south

I dote on this garden.

one more sweet pea clump that can stay for now (lower right)

A huge job awaits Allan this winter: pruning the wisteria.  It is so overgrown you could hardly see the flowers.  He will have to do the pruning because I get dizzy looking up; I will do the hauling to the trailer.  Probably this will happen at the very beginning of next February, except for some clipping back this fall before we go on staycation.

The pub called to us, and so we had an early (for us) dinner at 7:15.

fish and chips

the view from our table

How about that, we had another very good day.

 

 

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Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Being the social director of yesterday’s tour, arranging to visit each private garden (all but one at a time when the gardeners would be home), trying to set a date when all who wanted to could attend, fretting over social anxiety and feeling out of my league with two Big Name Gardeners, turned out to be well worth it as everyone agreed it had been a wonderful tour day.  However, both Allan and I slept extra late this morning! I had planned an easy work day, mostly watering, with two small projects (or so I thought).

I met two darling dogs over the fence next door to the post office.

I don’t normally put my hand into a dog’s yard.  This one was clearly friendly with a happy circling tail.  I wish they were there every day; I have only seen them the once. The dog’s affection for its ball reminded me of Monty Don’s dog, Nigel, star of Gardeners’ World.

Long Beach

We removed a very woody and tatty lavender from one of the planters.  Its inside was dark and gloomy and devoid of foliage.

before

after, with replacement soil and lavender

Helichrysum italicam

I have told people that although this plant smells strongly of curry, it is not edible.  It appears I am wrong about that, according to this article.  Although it smells of the strongest curry, the taste is said to be not like curry.  The flowers are inconsequential yellow things that I usually trim off.  I love the smell of the plant and its silver foliage. The linked article says that the flowers taste of bleu cheese, which I also love!

We added two curry plants to the planter we had redone last week.

The Shelburne Hotel

75 degrees F as we arrived at the Shelburne.

Speaking of curry plants, here is one we recently added to a planter on the room four deck.  The dahlia is out of scale but it requested that I not move it to the garden till later because it is quite happy in the pot.

Allan’s photo

center deck nandina, Allan’s photo

room 11 deck (Allan’s photo)

We watered and weeded. I trimmed tall non blooming cosmos to better reveal the signage.

front garden, looking north in shadow

the back garden

wedding candles still hanging in the laurel

the pub deck

the back garden

The candles were the battery powered ones.  I did not know that would work in jars of water.  I googled; they seem to be a special floating kind.  That would be great Halloween decor.

Ilwaco

After the Shelburne, we tried clearing a small garden on Howerton Avenue at the port of the roots  where the port crew had pulled out a sightline-blocking escallonia with a backhoe.  Or maybe pulled it out by truck, with a chain.  I had a few plants ready to plant, but was thwarted by the job being harder than I expected.  The root mass was especially  thick around a CoHo Charters sign that had been skillfully undamaged.

roots and black plastic under the soil and lava rock

Although we got it almost done, my anxiety level was high because Allan had to water the Ilwaco planters, a two hour job from start to finish (including watering our two volunteer pocket gardens).  A friend stopped to give us a political campaign sign (the wonderful Carolyn Long for Congress!) and we ran out of time and had to stop the Howerton bed before we were done.

Allan took the water trailer and watered the planters.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ at city hall before he deadheaded…

and after.

I walked the planters, checking on them for weeds (mostly chickweed) and deadheads. I finished at the planters by the boatyard…

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

…and then walked home, looking for the feral cats along Main Street.  I felt bad that I scared them off a chicken dinner that someone had left on a plate.

one of three storage lots where the wild cats live

waiting for me to leave so that dinner could resume

In the book I’ve been reading, Wind-Harps by Marion Cran, she learns that her new Siamese cat is actually related by blood to her beloved Tatty-Bogle, a Siamese whose death she still mourned.  I realized then that perhaps the soft looking and so shy grey cat who lives in the feral colony would perhaps be related to my late much lamented Smoky, who was born wild in Ilwaco just a couple of blocks from there.  I have only seen grey cat twice; he may be the shyest of all.

I deadheaded in the almost dusk at the volunteer Post Office and Fire Station gardens.  Allan was not happy that he finished up in almost darkness, dangerous in traffic.  The day ended on a stressful note. More like a medley of stress.  I will be so glad when watering season is over.  It is the one task that creates the most pressure because when the plants are dry, it must be done.  Shorter days make it harder to fit in an evening watering job like Ilwaco planters.

Allan has decided that he will participate in a local book fair with his self published guide to paddle trips in SW Washington and NW Oregon.  You can find him on Saturday, Oct 6th, at this event:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 23 August 2018

Js garden

Allan mowed the little pocket lawn and I weeded at J’s across the street.

front garden with carpet of thyme (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Long Beach

We had to trim more off the top of the dang blangity non-blooming Cosmos ‘Sensation’ mix.

feeling irritated

Of course, that will delay bloom even more.  If I had more time or energy, I might tear it all out and put something else in….but the tourist season only has two weeks to go, and by mid September surely it will throw out some side flowers…?? I live in hope.

front

back—I should have cut more.

As the director of the Bellevue Botanical Border said at Hardy Plant Weekend, “When we make a mistake, it is in public for everyone to see.”  This was not exactly a mistake because this once was a reliably good plant.

Here is the frog who lives in the water box. (Allan’s photo)

Downtown, Allan went south and I went north watering planters. While watering planters on Third Street in Long Beach, I enjoyed the music of this busker and I gave him a few dollars.

The sky was blue, the sun was out, and not too hot, and we had a brisk but not too brisk wind.  Perfect for the kite festival.  The entryway to the Bolstad approach was as close as either of us got to kite festival this week.

A city crew member jokingly asked us, “Why aren’t you out flying your kite today?” When I said no energy, he knew just how I felt.  Work consumes all my energy and then I just want to be home, gathering up some new energy from my garden for the next work week.

I walked a block to the east to get a closer look at a little garden that someone has made behind the Elks lodge in a raised round bed that used to be all horsetail.

Someone is deadheading regularly here.

I wish my fiery celosia at the fire station had done this well.

Allan noticed someone was stripping flowers off the two of the lavenders in two of the planters.

I swear I just might hang signs in them like I did on the blue globe thistle in the boatyard garden (“Please don’t pick me”, on a card hung right on the plant, proved to be effective).

We finished Long Beach with a tidy of the Veterans Field gardens.

Helenium ‘Mariachi’ (pretty sure) in Vet field

Shelburne Hotel

 We had made good time in Long Beach and got to the Shelburne 45 minutes early than usual.  We managed to keep that lead, a good thing as it is now getting dark around eight.  No more ten hour days!

We watered, deadheaded, did some but not a lot of garden clean up.  Deadheading the sweet peas is the most time consuming thing now.

sweet peas and Japanese anemones

Sweet pea ‘Blue Shift’ (maybe)

looking north

looking south

Allan was able to get onto the Room Four deck to do some much needed deadheading.  We are going to move the rose down into the garden this fall and replace it with a non deadheading sort of plant.

It looked quite sad when he got there, with black spot and dead flowers.

And will replace the cosmos with some sort of non deadhead-y plants. And will put the dahlia in the garden. It’s a nice red one.

This sort of pot, on the room 11 deck, needed no care and looks just fine.

chatting with some appreciative guests

the back garden (where you can dine from the pub menu)

one of the succulent pots on the back lower decks

Ilwaco

Allan watered the street trees and planters while I watered and did some weeding at the boatyard.

What a relief it was to breathe clean, non smoky air.

view from the south end of the boatyard today….

and on Monday, when it was so smoky I could barely see a boat coming in.

an interestingly fasciated euphorbia at the boatyard

taken from behind the fence because I water from behind the fence

as I walked along pulling horsetail; looking south

I walked home via some weeding and deadheading at the Ilwaco Fire Station garden.

Now for three much anticipated days off, two at home and one garden tour day on the north Oregon coast.  It will be the last touring trip off the peninsula this year.  We are skipping the Cannon Beach cottage tour so that Allan can enjoy the Rod Run auto show here with Scott and Tony.  And…I am tired and just want to stay on the peninsula for September. So…if you count on us to show you that tour by blogging about it, you had best get yourself tickets and go.

Allan’s photo: He finished watering at the post office garden at sunset.

I wrote a blog post while Allan worked on his boating blog and then made dinner.  (For those who wonder how I garden, read, and blog, it is because Allan cooks dinner that this blog can happen on a daily basis in work season.)  Just as we sat down to eat and watch telly at ten PM, I noticed that my night blooming cereus flower had opened.  It did not seem as scented as usual.  To think we might have missed it!

As we watched our telly, the delicate scent of the flower emerged and floated around the room.

I am so happy that our three day weekend starts tomorrow.  This time, I will not stay on the property the whole time, because on Saturday we are going garden touring.

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Monday, 13 August 2018

guest photos!

Mary of Klipsan Beach Cottages sent me two photos last night:

Bella in the KBC garden

and a snake in the shrubbery (good for eating slugs and snails)

before work today:

We duck under these apple-laden branches to leave the front porch.

carrying one of three clumps of daylilies to plant at the Shelburne later

In the front garden, a late poppy must be Mother of Pearl or Angel’s Choir.

Our volunteer garden at the post office, where we stop every day but Sunday because there is no home delivery of mail where we live:

A few days ago, the Ilwaco Timberland Library posted this nice thing on Facebook:

Long Beach

We weeded four more sections of the beach approach, just leaving three and an end cap to go.  I hope to finish it tomorrow, as well as trimming back the rugosa roses by the police station.  Kite Festival starts next Monday so we want the approach to look as good as possible, considering that it survives with no supplemental water (an impressive feat by the rugosa roses).

Allan’s photo; coreopsis does surprisingly well with no watering

I got to pet this darling dog, a schnauzer-dachshund:

Monty by name

Monty’s person and two other people asked about the rugosa rose hips.

We have this far to go…

and we have come this far

We then watered the downtown trees and planters.

A couple admiring blue eryngiums (Allan’s photo)

I took photos for the August planter reference post.  Here is a sneak preview of some, uncropped, that show the Long Beach scenery.

Lewis and Clark Square

We STILL have not tried the new Mexican restaurant behind L&C Square.  Our style is to work straight through, eating a sandwich while working or in the van between jobs.

L&C Square from across the street, police station and Vet Field to the left

Fifth Street Park, NE quadrant,  with frying pan and Allan watering

Above, to the left, a child is putting a quarter in a slot to make the Razor Clam sculpture squirt water.

Fifth Street Park, SE quadrant

I found a painted rock!

When I posted the rock on a local rock-painters group, I was told that a friend hid that one especially for me to find.  Well done!

one cottage in a courtyard of cute little cottages

looking across at west side of Fifth Street Park

In a Fifth Street Park bed, NE side, I admired this heather, even though it does not show up well.

I like heathers that are spikier, like this one.  Maybe it is a heath.  I have to read up.

rudbeckia and Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Once upon a time, I did not like orange flowers so did not grow California poppies or rudbeckia.  I have evolved.

Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’ is so wonderful. It goes and goes and goes.

Third Street Park

Stormin’ Norman’s and Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites

The flag shows that the wind was pushing us around today. Fortunately, it did not kick up till we were done with the beach approach.  I read later in a book by Monty Don (The Prickotty Bush) that a “lazy wind” goes right through you instead of around you.

A woman came up to me, seeing me using the hose, and said, “Now I understand.  I kept seeing you carrying a bucket and I thought, She’s sure getting a lot of water out of that bucket!” I showed her how it works:

bayonet and hose

lift the cap…

match up the notch, plug it in, twist, and Robert’s your father’s brother.

The Shelburne Hotel

Chef Casey Venus was picking some nasturtiums to garnish a cucumber soup.  I said sounded yummy and he brought us a bowl of it to share!

cold cucumber soup with crab…incredibly delicious

I was glad we had brought three clumps of daylilies from my garden to plant for his edible flower collection.

We watered and deadheaded.

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

the shady side of the front garden

It is a good thing cosmos has beautiful foliage, because most of the Sensation cosmos are just green feathery things with not a flower bud showing.

Ilwaco

While Allan watered the street trees and planters, I watered the boatyard.  At the south end, this view made me remember taking my black lab, Bertie Woofter, to swim on the west side of the boatyard.  Robert and I had a key to the back gate.

low tide

Straight across used to be all wild but is now part of the boatyard.

memories of Bertie Woofter swimming in that very spot

My note tied onto the blue globe thistle seems to be keeping people from picking it…

…even though eight out of ten elephant garlics have been picked under one of the official “please leave the flowers” signs.

The really big boat with a lot of clutter around it is gone (with its clutter) and all the hoses were in place, so watering went smoothly and easily.

I walked home, looking for the feral main street cats.

one orange one

and a black one

Further on the way home, a block east of our house, beautiful hydrangeas in an old garden:

 

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Thursday, 26 July 2018

The Depot Restaurant

weeding, deadheading, watering….

a vignette at the Depot

Amazingly, the dierama wands have not been broken by parking cars.

Long Beach

We started by tidying the garden at city hall.

elephant garlic before…

and after (Allan’s photo)

One of the clothing shops has been painted a deep red, the color of my grandma’s little red house (and with white trim, too).

We watered the planters, and these two are the only other photos I took on the main drag.

I love all the healthy agastaches, here with Calif. poppies and the great ‘Hopley’s Purple’ oregano.

a meadow effect with golden oregano

Allan’s photos:

Fifth Street Park

We ran out of downtown time before trimming the Alchemilla mollis.

After downtown, we watered the eight planters on Sid Snyder Drive.

It was dinner time at one of the horse ride corrals.

I’d been hoping to see a pony in the little corral.

We next checked on the welcome sign, where the cosmos are refusing to bloom, and gave them some bloom fertilizer.

lush and feathery with no flowers

front

a couple of flowers on the back side

I have had all sorts of cosmos problems this year.  At the Shelburne, some are fine (especially the new one called Cupcake) but others are tall with no flowers.  At Diane’s garden and the Depot and Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park, some that should be tall Sensation mix are short (but not short enough to be a mislabeled Sonata mix).  I did not fertilize each little plant while planting this year, having read that fertilizer can make them shoot up tall with no flowers.

I have always had cosmos in the welcome sign, and have had this problem before but not this badly.  I think perhaps I need to give up there and try a different plant—something with enough height to stand up to the Geranium ‘Rozanne’, something that will take our cool climate (no zinnias, for example), and an annual so that it can come out for the spring bulbs (and for horsetail clean up).

Shelburne Hotel

This is where I had been longing to be. We watered, weeded, deadheaded.

a good healthy agastache

in the back courtyard

‘Sunset’ runner beans grown by Roxanne of Basket Case Greenhouse

Front garden, looking south, with white phlox and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’

Nasturtium ‘Phoenix’

Front garden, looking north (I noticed the pub sign had not been hung up for the day.)

lily, with billows of unblooming cosmos

looking south from the north end

I resolved that we must mulch the frustratingly sparse looking north end.

The most northern, outside the fence bed was apparently a repository for all sorts of extra perennials, and all we have done to it is weed it.  I’d like to make it more interesting next year.

rather dull with lots of asters and orange montbretia, which have got to go.

I don’t know why I didn’t already make it better; we started this job in late February, as I recall.

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Euphorbia characias wulfenii can stay.

We also learned that one more upstairs room had a balcony with a miserable little pot of half dead plants.

Allan’s photo of the private deck of room 11

He schlepped it out of the room and down the stairs.

We will replant it with something next week.

I looked at the garden from various sidewalk aspects.

This patch of Crocosmia is slowly succumbing to rust, due to too much shade and not enough air circulation.  I later came up with an idea for next year.

I longed to finish the day with a meal in the pub, but we had to leave so that we could water…

Ilwaco.

I gave the boatyard an hour of weeding and a half hour of watering while Allan watered the street trees and planters.

boatyard garden

the west side of the boatyard

Across the street from the smaller boats to the left is my old garden. The fellow who bought it from me, an accomplished and creative carpenter, has it almost paid off.  I would love to see the remodeling he has done.  I dream sometimes about going there and finidng it all changed.

My “please don’t pick me” sign on the Echinops appears to be working.

watering from behind the fence

I’m going to divide this vigorous helianthus into several more clumps.

same audience every time I water here

One of the two chickadees posed as a figurehead.

I am pleased the deer don’t eat the lilies.

Meanwhile, Allan had pulled the flower-jacked gladiolus corms.

before

I still do not know who sticks glads in the planters.  It is not working out well as the flowers get so frequently stolen.

I went with Allan to weed while he watered the fire station garden when he’d finished the planters (at 8 PM).

our volunteer garden at Ilwaco Fire Dept.

my two terribly slow ornamental corn plants from seed

When we got home at twilight, I was pleased to see that the Norwood house had been painted a pretty pale blue by Precision Coast Painting, which had accomplished this excellent job quickly and quietly without a noisy paint sprayer.

A pretty addition of colour to our street

 

 

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Monday, 23 July 2018

Long Beach

We watered, deadheaded, and otherwise tidied the street trees gardens and planters. The wind was annoying but not terribly cold…yet.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Tigridia

Variegated bulbous oat grass, which to some looks like a weed.

But look! It’s variegated! (At least unless it reverts to green blades and then out it goes.)

Allan’s photo: Funny hats are a common sight in Long Beach.

new lilies in Fifth Street Park

For those familiar with Long Beach, you will know where I mean when I say the two garden beds just south of Funland are not ours to care for.  Funland just mulched them with these pine needles; both Allan and I found that interesting when we walked by it at different times.

my photo

Allan’s photo

Allan got done before me and pulled horsetail from the corner bed at Veterans Field, where he found a sign of the Friday Farmers Market:

among the Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’ (Allan’s photo)

I recently read that Brodiaea likes dry conditions and so am going to try it out at the port curbside gardens.

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ at the Vet Field flag pavilion

I wonder if after we finally retire from LB someday, will someone put in a more traditional red, white and blue garden?

I took photos of 17 of the 18 street tree gardens and am going to publish a reference post (just once, not every month) tomorrow morning. (There is a long, non-bloggable story of why just 17.)

Shelburne Hotel

We watered, including Allan checking on the upstairs balcony and deck pots.

room 4 deck

The rose that got moved to the room 4 deck is going to flower. I hope it is a good one and not some old root stock.  It is happy here.

I love working at the Shelburne.  The garden makes me happy.  Today was an intense session of thinning and editing, including pulling a sheaf of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ had appeared to have gladiolus rust and needed to depart the garden post haste, bagged.  There is way too much Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ spread all around anyway, although I did not feel as much that way when it was in full bloom.

Along the railing (right) is where I pulled suspect crocosmia.

I debated in early spring about whether to prune or remove that ‘Helmond Pillar’ Barberry. Glad I pruned the pitiful branches and let it revive itself.

The garden got some breathing room by the pulling of running aster, mostly.

I keep cutting back the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ so it won’t block the pub sign from the street view.

Ilwaco

When we left the sheltered Shelburne garden, we realized that a strong cold wind of at least 20 mph had kicked up.  It was blasting fiercely along the boatyard garden, where I had to water.  I felt tremendously sorry for myself, wearing a winter scarf in late July and so very cold.

not enjoyable at all

my audience

I wondered if the birds were cold, too.

The larger boats gave me some temporary shelter from the cold north wind.

I had no will to weed in the icy gale.

horrible horsetail

After watering and deadheading a few sweet peas, I just walked by the garden and on home.

Someone had picked more blue globe thistle right under one of the signs…

“Please leave flowers for everyone to enjoy.”

…and had pulled some out by the roots and just left it there.

Perhaps a passerby interrupted the thievery or perhaps the thief decided the stem was too stickery.

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ is looking brown instead of silver.

too much wind? not enough water?

?? why?

santolina with pesky self sown orange montbretia

I’d like to pull swathes of floppy California poppies, but not today.

My walk home:

mystery paths in the field across the street

First Avenue

Behind the museum is the Discovery Garden, which is now maintained by the Pacific County Master Gardeners.

Interpretive sign from the original park installation.

This was formerly a recirculating stream.

formerly upper pool of little stream

Our friend Bill Clearman helped to construct this memorial wall.  I feel that these big planters distract from viewing its beauty.

This was the unobstructed wall years ago.

The tiles are by Renee O’Connor.

As for the plans that the MGs have for this garden, you can read about their project here.  I am not a Master Gardener so am not involved in this volunteer project.  I admit to a prejudice against “native plant gardens”. It is a rare artificially created native landscape that doesn’t look just scruffy, in my opinion.  It can be done, by the brilliant Leslie Buck, for one.

I hoped to see some of the feral cat colony (featuring many orange cats with quizzical faces) further down the block.  They were all sheltered somewhere out of the wind.

On Main Street (which is not very “main”, being only two and a half blocks long).

Meanwhile, Allan had watered the Ilwaco street trees and planters with the water trailer, also not enjoyable I am sure (but at least it is a little bit in and out of the van and thus with breaks from the wind).

for those interested in the mechanics of watering the Ilwaco planters

We did not plant gladiolas in any of the planters.  Someone persists in planting them in the planters, and someone (else, I am sure) persists in picking them pretty much every year when they are at their best.

finger blight

I told Allan later to just pull out the foliage and corm when that happens.

I texted him when I got home; he had just started hose watering our volunteer gardens at the fire station and the post office.  A nine hour day for me and longer for him.

 

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