Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘weather’ Category

Sunday, 26 March 2017

More exceptionally wet weather kept me indoors.  Even though I’ve heard of our region being described as the Pacific NorthWET, I feel (without checking statistics) that February and March have been exceptionally rainy.

I took the briefest of walks out into the front garden.

IMG_0947

Pieris and flowering plum


IMG_0946.JPG

pieris


IMG_0948.JPG

needs detailed weeding!


IMG_0949.JPG

one showy tulip


IMG_0950.JPG

pleased that my rosa pteracantha has leafed out; I had been worried about it.


IMG_0951.JPG

narcissi


IMG_0954.JPG

Japanese maple


IMG_0956.JPG

also relieved to see Tetranpanax leafing out after a cold winter


IMG_0941.JPG

No feline had come outdoors with me.


IMG_0959.JPG

Skooter


IMG_0960.JPG

Smokey

I applied myself to finishing Thank You for Being Late…

IMG_0961.JPG

Parts of it were good…

…and then turned to a much shorter book that I’d been looking forward to and that was soon due at the library.

BECLOO

I had read all of Betty’s books, enjoying both her acerbic wit and the Seattle and Vashon Island settings.  (Warning: The Egg and I, her most famous book, published in 1945, has some passages of racism toward the local native tribe that bothered me very much when I read it.  This is addressed in just one page of the biography.)

As I had always suspected, there was a more harrowing truth to the egg farm story than was revealed in Betty’s fictionalized autobiography.

I had started young on Betty’s books, with Mrs. Piggle Wiggle being a favourite of mine in grade school.

images.jpg

I was astonished to read that in the 1930s, Betty lived just three blocks east of where I grew up (6317 15th; I lived at 6309 12th).  I must have walked by the house many times.

IMG_1021.jpg

 

Betty_15th_Ave_house-300x180.jpg

Betty’s home, as it was

I was even more astonished to read that the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books might have been an influence on the name I chose in 1994 for my gardening business.

IMG_1019.jpg

In spring of 1994, I somehow ran across (before I had internet!) a mention of a place in England called “Tangley Cottage”.  I wonder if my memories of Mrs. Piggle Wiggle’s “tangly garden” is why the name appealed to me so much.

Paula Becker felt compelled to find Betty’s story.  That is just how I felt about Mass Observation diarist Nella Last, and about Gladys Taber’s memoirs.

“Why do some moments in history, some people’s stories, resonate for us more than others?  Perhaps because on some level, our own histories are deeply listening for them.  Listening to the quiet voice saying, Find me.”  —Paula Becker, Looking for Betty McDonald

Someone else that I found more about this week was Samuel Mockbee.  First, he was mentioned in the real estate listing of a hidden garden paradise we recently toured, and then his Rural Studio was mentioned in the great book, Deep South, by Paul Theroux.  Last night, we watched Citizen Architect,  a video about him.  It made me want to be young and a student at the Rural Studio.

MV5BMTExOTQxNjY5OTFeQTJeQWpwZ15BbWU3MDgzODY4MDY@._V1_UY268_CR1,0,182,268_AL_.jpg

 

As you can see, rainy days are in many ways quite perfect.

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 23 March 2017

I might have tried to work if the weather had been good.  I did not want to go out, feeling poorly, in rain and wind.

When the sun appeared in the mid afternoon, Allan departed for Long Beach to do some weeding and deadheading.

DSC01474.jpg

returning a book to the Ilwaco library (Deep Survival, I read it, did not love it)

DSC01475.jpg

Long Beach welcome sign

DSC01476.jpg

He laid out the deadheads to show me how many there were.

DSC01477.jpg

welcome sign

DSC01478.jpg

Long Beach city crew putting up banners.

DSC01479.jpg

deer-pulled tulips in a planter on one of the main deer intersections (where we no longer plant new tulips)

DSC01480.jpg

Narcissi and primrose.  It is hard to get ALL the tatty hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) foliage pulled.

DSC01481.jpg

crocuses chomped by deer.  Pretty sure they had flowered first.  Also on one of the main deer intersections (7th South)

DSC01482.jpg

tulips

DSC01484.jpg

deadheads. so glad Allan went to pick them

DSC01486.jpg

after, with grape hyacinth

DSC01487.jpg

Muscari (grape hyacinth) and lavender

DSC01490.jpg

Tulipa sylvestris, one of my favourites

DSC01491.jpg

snail damage

DSC01492.jpg

Sluggo got applied.

DSC01493.jpg

lilies emerging in Fifth Street Park

DSC01500.jpg

Muscari, one narcissi, scilla (which I did not plant…it goes back to volunteer days).

DSC01501.jpg

by Fifth Street Park

 

DSC01503.jpg

the rain returned

DSC01505.jpg

narcissi and rhododendron

DSC01524

more white and blue scilla (which would take over if I let it)

DSC01506.jpg

more banners, with Fitz and Parks Manager Mike

DSC01510.jpg

in a street tree garden

DSC01511.jpg

tulips and crocuses 

DSC01512.jpg

DSC01513.jpg

By Stormin’ Norman’s. Calocephalus brownii came through the winter.

DSC01514.jpg

under a street tree

DSC01515.jpg

Allan checked on the Veterans Field gardens:

DSC01519.jpg

DSC01520.jpg

DSC01521.jpg

anemones

Meanwhile, at home:

skootersmokey.jpg

I’ve never seen Skooter and Smokey snuggle up before.  It was Smokey’s idea; he tucked himself in under Skooter’s head.

I had read about Jaywick, a semi-derelict English seaside town recently in A Kingdom By The Sea by Paul Theroux and decided to look at a video about it, which turned into watching several.  I could actually afford a bungalow there.

The longest and most official Jaywick video is here.

From that, instead of reading, I segued into the Bill Bryon Notes from a Small Island series on youtube.  I meant to watch only the first one and ended up watching all of them in my comfy chair. Partway through my watching, Allan returned with a tasty crab roll for me from Captain Bob’s Chowder.

In closing, here is a public service announcement from Steve of the Bayside garden:

There are two upcoming special events which Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden hosts — the “Early Show” and “Mother’s Day” events.    Details on one-sheet, attached.    Both have judged flower shows and plant sales.  Info on rules, etc., on both at:  http://rhodies.org/chapter/pdx_activities_detailed.htm#early a page available at www.rhodies.org, the Portland Chapter’s website.

 It could be a worthwhile day trip for Peninsula people.

rhodies.png

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 12 March 2017

Because we had a political meeting in Naselle this afternoon, we had decided to leave home in time to drive half an hour further and visit a museum in Skamokawa.

skamokawa.png

DSC07030.JPG

driving along the Columbia River

I was not best pleased that it was a beautiful day and would have been excellent for weeding the boatyard garden.

DSC07032.JPG

two wrecks?

Here is what the white remnant of a boat looked like in 1995, in the same little bay:

22359_244686844778_7121030_n.jpg

For some reason, it had been deemed unsalvageable.

As we drove along, I pondered the fact that the many conifers along our roads are why our landscapes look more somber than the airier ones that Mr Tootlepedal photographs in Scotland.

DSC07034.JPG

scenery heavy with evergreens

We arrived at our destination in Skamokawa: Redmen Hall, which I had read was hosting an exhibit about tugboats and steamers on the Columbia.

DSC07036.JPG

The view from the parking lot

A back door offered easy access without all those stairs…and a disheartening sign.

DSC07035.JPG

NOOOOOOOO

Across the highway, below, is a general store and café where we have stopped before.  I thought that, because of Skamokawa being such a small town, I might luck into a museum docent there.

DSC01635.jpg

looking down on the grocery store and post office

DSC07037.JPG

Redmen Hall from below

In a room right on the river, behind the store, an antiques sale was on for the day.

DSC01634.jpg

DSC07039.JPG

antiques in a light filled room

DSC07038.JPG

I used to have an apple like this till my good friend Sophie (a dog) broke it…for which she was forgiven.

I found two things to buy.  One is a present so I cannot show it!

And sure enough, when I mentioned having driven from Ilwaco to find the museum was closed, I learned that one of the docents was ill, and another one offered to open it for us.

DSC07042.JPG

behind the store/café

Off the deck by the store, a boater was buzzing around.  I am sure Allan wished he was out boating, too.

DSC07040.JPG

DSC07043.JPG

DSC01628.jpg

Allan’s photo

We followed the docent back up to Redmen Hall.  The hall was once a school house.  Amazingly, it used be down where the highway is.  When the road was put through, the building got moved up the hill with “steam donkeys” (not really donkeys!).

DSC07056

The old school house remembered.

DSC01649.jpg

Allan went straight up to the bell tower. (I did not.)

DSC01636.jpg

DSC01640.jpg

DSC01641.jpg

DSC01642.jpg

Step on a pedal to open the shutters for the view.

DSC01643.jpg

The views from the bell tower.

DSC01645.jpg

river town from high above (and a boat ramp)

On the second floor, well designed historical panels go all around the walls of a big open room.

DSC01637.jpg

DSC07054.JPG

What Skamokawa means

DSC01650.jpg

DSC07046.JPG

interpretive panels

DSC07047.JPG

DSC07048.JPG

DSC07050

the kind docent who let us in.  The way the panels are put together reminds me of my grandma’s scrapbooks.

DSC07052.JPG

when the road went through

DSC07053.JPG

a dance where “ladies may walk on their partners feet, and no questions will be asked”.

DSC07055.JPG

another strong woman

DSC01221.jpg

river pictures (Allan’s photo)

A glass case held birds provided by the Audubon Society…

DSC07049.JPG

an erstwhile Mr Grumpy had fine plumage.

DSC07051

the view

We dropped a contribution into the money jar and also spent a pretty penny in the well -stocked gift shop, including two books (quiet, because one is a present), a documentary called Work is Our Joy (about gillnetting), and some notecards.  If we’d had time, we could have watched Work is Our Joy right in the museum.  I will enjoy it from my comfy chair at home.  I already identify with the title.

DSC01654.jpg

DSC07064.JPG

One of three nooks of books.

DSC07063.JPG

Well represented: the books of Grays River author Robert Pyle

DSC07066.JPG

Musician Doug is the spouse of our friend Beth; they live nearby but we had had no time to look them up.

DSC07060.JPG

river town art

haul.jpg

most of our purchases

The hall is open Thursdays through Sundays from noon to four.  We recommend a visit.

We had a little over half an hour to to get back to our Indivisible meeting in Naselle.  I could not resist a side trip to the historic 1905 Grays River covered bridge.

DSC07084.JPG

on the way

Tying in with our visit to Redmen Hall: author Robert Michael Pyle lives in a house with a view of the covered bridge.  I thought it would be kind of nosy to add a photo of his house, so here is the bridge.

DSC07070.JPG

DSC07071.JPG

DSC01657.jpg

under the bridge (Allan’s photo)

DSC01660.jpg

The river running fast and high.  (Allan’s photo)

In particularly stormy times, the river has flooded the valley.

DSC01661.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC01662

Allan’s photo

DSC07072.JPG

Here we go.

DSC07073.JPG

DSC07083.JPG

the other end

Before we turned around, I had to get a closer look at two trees beside  the parking area.

DSC07074.JPG

DSC01663.jpg

going in for a closer look

DSC07075.JPG

DSC07078.JPG

moss and licorice fern

DSC01664.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC01665.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC07079.JPG

assorted critters

Ooops.  I suddenly realized time had slipped by and we would be 25 minutes late to the meeting at Hunters Inn, Naselle.  I told myself that it was ok; we have been to almost every liberal political meeting available since November so we could be late to just one.

DSC01224.jpg

DSC07089.JPG

part of the gathering

DSC07091.JPG

postcards laid out on three booths

DSC07090.JPG

One member brought this.

We discussed, shared ideas, and laid some plans for future events.

On the way home, Allan and I detoured to look at a garden we had admired when attending last month’s meeting.

DSC01682.jpg

The garden in question is next door to Naselle Timberland Library. (Allan’s photo)

DSC01680.jpg

lots of narcissi about to bloom (Allan’s photo)

Next door: a large garden which I intend to look at every time we have a Naselle meeting.

DSC07103.JPG

DSC07096.JPG

DSC07095.JPG

DSC01676.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC01674.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC07097.JPG

pieris and the church next door

DSC07102.JPG

Right across the street sits another charming house.

DSC07098.JPG

I wonder if there will be sweet peas on that fence in summer. Or that could be a dog path!

DSC07099.JPG

wrap around porch

DSC07100.JPG

DSC07101

a tree with personality

DSC01673.jpg

Allan’s photo

As we got close to home, I looked at the weather forecast and must admit I did begin to fret about losing what might be the only nice gardening day this week.  Remembering that we now have light till after 7 PM (yay for daylight saving time!), I resolved to get two hours work done in my own garden.

While clipping some Joe Pye weed, I gave an experimental dig at a large fuchsia.

DSC07111.JPG

one of two many fuchsia magellanica

To my surprise, it shifted, so Allan helped me pull it out.

DSC07112.JPG

after…Ok, he pulled, I watched and encouraged.

DSC07115.JPG

project: clean up middle bed, before…

DSC07133.JPG

and after

DSC07122.JPG

Woe!! One of two matched asophedels has disappeared from the right hand pot.

DSC07131.JPG

I will snag this asphodel from a different pot.

DSC07113.JPG

Frosty

DSC07117.JPG

bogsy wood swale

DSC07130.JPG

Oh for more time in the garden; so much to do.

DSC07129.JPG

Skooter obsessing about the frogs.

The unfortunate forecast:

rain.png

Resolved: no more daytime meetings on nice days till we have spring clean up done!

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

We had a huge amount of rain, resulting in no gardening.  Allan took some photos in the back garden:

DSC01045.jpg

DSC01046.jpg

DSC01047.jpg

DSC01048.jpg

DSC01050.jpg

DSC01051.jpg

DSC01052.jpg

path by the bogsy wood

DSC01053.jpg

DSC01056.jpg

path to the bridge

DSC01054.jpg

bogsy wood swale

DSC01058.jpg

next summer’s campfire wood

DSC01055.jpg

the swale bridge

After a great deal of news reading, I started a new book, recommended by Our Kathleen.

DSC06942.JPG

At first, the author annoyed me.

This doesn’t sound farcical to me:

DSC06943.JPG

I didn’t like this classism:

DSC06944.JPG

I almost put the book aside.  Fortunately, I persevered because it got much better.

The author is seeking how poor people live:

DSC06945.JPG

DSC06946.JPG

I wonder if this is true.

DSC06947.JPG

At over 400 pages, Deep South should keep me occupied for two more excessively rainy days, which is about what is predicted.

I had wrought a miracle over the past two days, actually getting the bathroom closet completely emptied.  Today, Allan removed the door and walls, which will give us a corner to store the glass bricks for the tub project.  I expected the sounds of a sledgehammer and splintering faux wood; instead, he did it neatly with a screwdriver. Glass blocks will make the end wall when the tub (still to be acquired) is placed in the already plumbed spot; a tub used to be there till the previous owner had it removed in order to place a rolltop desk in the bathroom.  Bathroom/slash office was an unusual combination.

bathroom.png

This probably doesn’t seem like interesting blog fodder. However, I know of one reader who will be interested to know that the glass blocks got moved into the bathroom (but not the 95 Pound bag of mortar). 

Allan saw a good sunset while discarding old particle board shelving.

DSC01065.jpg

DSC01067.jpg

DSC01072.jpg

Skooter enjoying the water boxes

DSC01073.jpg

DSC01074

Read Full Post »

Monday, 6 March 2017

I woke to sunshine and thought we could work…until I took a look out the window.

DSC06910.JPG

view out the south cat door

Never mind.

DSC01591.jpg

Skooter, staying in.  (Allan’s photo)

Allan took some snowy garden photos:

DSC01026.jpg

DSC01027.jpg

DSC01029.jpg

DSC01592

DSC01593.jpg

DSC01594

DSC01596.jpg

DSC01597.jpg

I see a black spotty hellebore leaf that should be removed.

DSC01598.jpg

DSC01599.jpg

hypericum

DSC01602.jpg

DSC01600.jpg

DSC01617.jpg

DSC01619.jpg

DSC01604.jpg

DSC01605.jpg

DSC01606.jpg

DSC01611

DSC01621.jpg

When he went to the post office and dropped off three books at the library, he took more photos of the community building garden’s crocuses.

DSC00799.jpg

DSC00800.jpg

Meanwhile, I was reading.

IMG_0352.JPGIt was difficult to leave the book for an early evening meeting of the Living Liberally Pacific County group.  I had only heard of Swallows and Amazons in the past year and was recently reminded of it by a mention on the Tootlepedal blog. 

DSC06920.JPG

At Adrift Hotel in Long Beach


DSC06919

Folks barbecuing nearby in icy wind.


DSC01030.jpg

determined to wrest all enjoyment from their vacation


DSC01031.jpg

into the meeting room we go

After another productive political meeting, Allan and I repaired upstairs to the [pickled fish] restaurant.

I’d been wanting to try absinthe for some time, because I’m a fan of artemisias in the garden.  It is made from Artemisia absinthium, which you can read about here. [pickled fish] serves it “in the traditional way”, involved a decanter, a spigot, and the melting of a sugar cube.

DSC06927.JPG

DSC06922.jpg

DSC06929.JPG

absinthe: licorice, sweet, strong


DSC06930.JPG

delicious fennel sausage pizza

Upon departure, I was especially struck by the beauty of the planters in the foyer.  Perhaps the absinthe enhanced my appreciation.

DSC06932.JPG

DSC06933.JPG

DSC06935.JPG

DSC06936.JPG

DSC06937.JPG

some artemisia (but not absinthium)

Swallows and Amazons

During the day and into the night I read Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome.  How did I miss this 1930 classic as a child, especially since I had then sought out British children’s book authors (like Edith Nesbit and C.S. Lewis)?  As I read today, I occasionally felt verklempt about being old.

A few favourite bits from this delightful adventure of children camping on an island in the Lake District:

DSC06913.JPG

DSC06914.JPG

…….

DSC06915.JPG

……..

Oh, to have a mother as open to her children having adventures:

DSC06917.JPG

…………….

DSC06918.JPG

I have learned that the book is the first of a series.  I will be reading more of them.

DSC06939.JPG

public service announcement

Maggie Stuckey, author of one of my favourite kitchen gardening books, The Bountiful Container, is going to be speaking at all four Timberland libraries on the subject of vegetable gardening in containers.  While I would most like to attend the talk at our local Ilwaco branch, it conflicts with an ACLU training session, so we will go to the Ocean Park one.  Allan took this photo at the library today.

 

DSC01043

Thursday at Ocean Park, Saturday at Ilwaco

Read Full Post »

Guest photo from last midweek, from THE Oysterville Garden:

imagejpeg_0

photo by Melissa Van Domelen

Sunday, 5 March 2017

Now it feels like we have returned from spring to winter:

DSC01003.jpg

early morning hail and thunder

DSC01005.jpg

Having missed our garden club dinner last week, the North Beach Garden Gang met for brunch at Salt Pub.  (All but two photos today are by Allan.)

DSC01007.jpg

This is the next garden awaiting our attention, west of Salt Hotel.

DSC01008.jpg

It did not get awfully weedy over the winter.

DSC01011.jpg

Melissa and Dave arrive

DSC01016.jpg

our view

DSC01017.jpg

DSC01019.jpg

two egg breakfast

DSC01020.jpg

eggs benedict

DSC06909.JPG

heuvos rancheros

DSC01021.jpg

coming soon-ish.  Allan and I have tickets already.

The five of us lingered over our table for two hours, catching up on all the gardening news. It was especially pleasing to me to be greeted by another diner there, Lorna, who used to own Andersen’s RV Park and was one of our top favourite clients for the many years we gardened there.

I had just been thinking how now that we have six fewer big spring clean ups than we used to have, bad weather is not a crisis in the early spring.

DSC01023.jpg

clearing but still cold and windy

DSC01025.jpg

Todd, me, Melissa, Dave

In the afternoon, I simply finished a book I started last night.

images.jpg

Yesterday evening, I read a short post apocalyptic novel (Thirst, by Benjamin Warner) that I only mildly enjoyed. Today’s choice was excellent; I especially appreciated that the protagonist was autistic and I could well identify with her ways of coping in the world after a comet hits our planet.  Turning from political non fiction to post apocalypse fiction hasn’t been that much of a change.  Coming up soon is Swallows and Amazons which should be much cheerier.  I haven’t even started it and I’ve already dreamt about reading it.

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 4 March 2017

In the early afternoon, we crossed the Astoria Megler Bridge and joined a roomful of like minded folk for an Indivisible North Coast Oregon meeting.

DSC00989.jpg

a darling small house by where we parked (Allan’s photo).  A sunny garden in front would have no privacy, though.


DSC00974.jpg

Allan’s photo, on the way

Astoria was parked up because of a winter brewery festival. We walked two blocks in the rain, passing one of my favourite little gardens on the way to the Fort George Brewery meeting room.

DSC00987.jpg

Allan’s photo

This ornately fenced garden is built by piling soil (now mulched with washed dairy manure) on top of pavement.

DSC00988.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC00975.jpg

Allan’s photo: tulip foliage, and pigeon pecking in the manure

DSC06872.JPG

DSC06871.JPG

DSC00985.jpg

DSC06875.JPG

a goodly crowd


DSC00977.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC00976.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC06874.JPG

a neat driftwood thing

DSC06885.JPGDSC06876.JPG

Some thoughts from the meeting:

Indivisible is opposed to the ABC of authoritarianism, bigotry, corruption.

A speaker advised that we send postcards to politicians…”even a picture postcard works because I think they stand out,” she said.  This made me smile because of our recent art postcard parties.

example.jpg

an example from one of our postcard parties

A woman from Germany spoke, saying “who would have thought a little painter from Austria could have killed millions” and she asked, “How could my people not see this coming, how could they look away?”  She said “My life is a series of attempts to make up for the crimes of my ancestors”.  When she goes to a protest, her thought when seeing a photographer is: Is he from the newspaper or from Homeland Security?  She believes she sees the early signs of fascism.  Right here is her recommended reading on the subject.

The following speaker quoted this: “What you would be doing in 1930s Germany is what you are doing now.”

Action item: A member of KMUN radio asks that we write to or call members of the Senate Committee on Appropriations asking that public radio continue to be funded.  Small rural stations like Astoria’s KMUN depend on federal funding far more than city stations do.

Afterwards, we were encouraged to sign up if we had interest in particular topics (education, environment, immigration, health care, equal rights).DSC06882.JPG).

DSC06880.JPG

Allan took the opportunity to buy a women’s march copy of the Daily Astorian.

DSC00983.jpg

Afterwards, we walked by the Fort George Brewery’s lower garden, also freshly mulched.  The ornamental grasses have been cut back since last time we went to the Blue Scorcher Café next door.

DSC06886.jpg

DSC06887.JPG

Fort George garden

We walked by the temptations of the Blue Scorcher because we wanted to try out a new restaurant in Seaside, Oregon.

In Seaside, it was too wet and miserably windy to walk around and look at Pam Fleming’s city gardens.

DSC06889.JPG

drive by photo

DSC06890.JPG

dsc06903

DSC00997.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC00991.jpg

a new restaurant (Allan’s photo)


DSC00993.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC06896.JPG

DSC06897.JPG

a warm and simple place


DSC00992.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC06892.JPG

something so sweet on the menu


DSC06894.JPG

many choices

DSC06895.JPG

I had to try the cauliflower appetizer, hoping that it would be similar to the zahra from Seattle’s Mediterranean Kitchen…and it was.

DSC06898.JPG

DSC00995.jpg

Allan’s chicken sandwich

dsc06899

The tasty baba ganoush had pickled on it; I just put them to one side because I’m not used to that.  All food is made fresh so I bet I could ask for no pickles next time, and there will be a next time.

dsc06905

the turnaround at the end of Broadway


DSC00998.jpg

Pam’s garden on the turnaround (Allan’s photos)

DSC00999.jpg

DSC01002.jpg

We shopped at Costco.  Wouldn’t this elaborate plastic apple container make an interesting little seedling greenhouse?

DSC06906.JPG

IMG_0336.JPG

stormy crossing of the Columbia on the way home: freighters at anchor, waiting


IMG_0339.JPG

light snow and fog on the hills on the Washington side of the bridge


IMG_0340.JPG

in the dusk, golden daffodils that someone once planted on the hillside

According to the weather forecast, we are due for several days of bad weather, possibly even light snow.  I will not mind reprising staycation.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »