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Archive for the ‘weather’ Category

Thursday, 22 June 2017

I’ll get my initial 25 mph wind complaint out of the way right here at the beginning, and get back to more fervent complaining at the end.

First, a watering of all the container plants at home.  I still don’t have the patio area tidied and arranged and it is almost July!

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As we drove off to work, we saw that Dave and Melissa were working on a former garden we had created several years ago.  We quit because of…reasons.  I wouldn’t say it bothered me to see that garden fill with weeds; however, for the sake of the remaining good plants, I was glad to see them working on it.

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Sea Star Gardening doing a great job releasing plants from weedy smothering.

Long Beach

We weeded and tidied at the welcome sign and made sure the water was on, because the temperature for this weekend is predicted to be 90 degrees.  (I’m going to complain about that for sure.)

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Welcome sign…seems lacking without the high maintenance Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ that I decided to forgo this year. Also, no one had echibeckia available. Agastache ‘Summer Glow’ is not making a good background show at all.

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I hope the cosmos get taller soon.  Must remind self many plants have been slowed this year by cold weather.

Despite the wind, our next project was to start a methodical end to end weeding of the beach approach.  We’ve been jumping around to the sections that need mulch the most.  Today, I did not think we had time to get mulch from the works yard, so weeding took priority. (All Allan’s photos:)

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starting at the west end

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sand and clover

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These big flat yellow clovers are satisfying to pull because they come out easily on one main stems and clear a big area when gone.  (Allan’s photo)

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After: We got two out of 12.5  sections done, with probably another whole section or more done earlier this week in mulched areas further on.  Only took 1 1/2 of hours for two sections, compared to about 3 hours (meaning 6 with two people) per section on the initial spring weeding. (Allan’s photo)

My goal is to get through the whole garden by July 4th and then to do the complete mulching of all low and/or open areas by mid July’s Sandsations event.  The garden will be a little wild but will, I hope, not have tall weed grasses or vetch all through the roses.

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after

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passersby

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We usually eat lunch by holding a peanut butter sandwich with one hand and taking bites while weeding with another hand.  Often I forget to eat lunch at all. Today we rewarded ourselves for our good work with a Pink Poppy Bakery treat and coffee at Abbracci Coffee Bar by Fifth Street Park (east side).

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In the words of Madeline of Pink Poppy Bakery: “It may look plain but don’t judge a bundt by it’s cover! Pecan brown sugar pound cake will remind you of Grandma’s kitchen.”

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In Abbracci Coffee Bar

Next, we weeded in Fifth Street Park.

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I had petted this friendly little doggie named Woo Woo.

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Allan weeded an annoying scrim of horsetail.

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Allan used the string trimmer to clear this area that goes behind the restroom.

Someone years ago planted “dwarf” pampas grass on the L shaped “behind the restroom” area.  It is infested with weeds. I made it clear a few years back that it was no longer our problem.  In my opinion, it needs to be totally removed…by someone younger and stronger.

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Woo Woo and her guy having lunch from Captain Bob’s Chowder. (Allan’s photo)

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Northwest corner before weeding horsetail and trimming stems that had gone cattywampus in the wind. Forgot to take an after.

With the park pretty thoroughly weeded, we set out on our watering walkabout.  I went north and Allan went south on Pacific Way (the main street).

Allan’s photos:

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starting at the carousel

I’m amazed that allium has not been bothered.  If they would remain unbothered, I would plant a lot more of them in the planters.  In previous years, they did not last more than a few days before being plucked.

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yellow bidens

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the recently re-done southernmost planter

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ending across the street from the carousel

my photos:

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In Fifth Street park, east side: Eryngium and starry Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’.  The latter is starting to make up for its rampant, floppy foliage.

A young woman tourist stood by this Basket Case Greenhouse basket….

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and said “This is just what my baskets look like at home…” and then laughed and added, “Not so much!”  I could have said “You can get one just like that at the Basket Case on Sandridge for $29.99!”

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Looking across the street, I thought the Stormin’ Norman planter looked great…..

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…with lots of red to tone with the building.

When I got there at the end of my rounds, I found it full of chickweed and fireweed and the dangnable ornamental wire plant that we have tried to eliminate.

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Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’

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Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

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Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

Because I was all out of photos for the NIVA green Facebook page, I stopped in there to take some.

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NIVA green

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I peeked into the plant section at Dennis Company and saw this list of deer resistant plants.

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I have found they do eat Astilbe and Gaura, and I am sorry, but this needs a spell check.

Ilwaco

I walked around all the planters and street tree gardens and groomed them (especially the deadheading of the older and larger Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’, most of which are rocking back and forth a bit after the recent windstorm).  The wind was horrible…so cold, and so strong it was like a bully almost knocking me over at times.

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a business’s planter on First Avenue

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First Avenue window

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Allan watered and fertilized all the planters with the water trailer.

Since the last thorough go-round, a lot of big weeds had appeared.

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under one of the street trees! (Allan’s photo)

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the orange lilies someone planted in one of our planters. (Allan’s photo)

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one of my favourite tree beds blowing in the wind

A friend drove by on the way to birdwatch at the port and said “It’s late, you have to go home! I saw you can hardly walk across the street!”  I said, “I can’t; this has to be done!” And it did have to be done; we could not quit with only two thirds of the planters watered and cared for.

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old Erysimum, before

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after

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boatyard

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boatyard garden (will get plenty of weeding next week)

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picotee poppy at the end of the boatyard garden (Allan’s photo)

We finished by watering and some weeding at our post office garden, by which time we were both cold and wet and miserable and windblown and squabbling after a 9.5 hour day.

Tomorrow, I have some local weeding to do and Allan has some volunteering at the playground build project. That will make for a short work week.  We will be making up for that with many hours next week.

 

 

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Tuesday, 20 June 2017

We woke to one of those soaking misty rains that appeared to have been falling all night; I had heard the dripping into the rain barrel outside my window at 2 AM.  This led to a slow start on the day.

As I was carrying a change of clothes to the van, I saw three young women walking by saying “Oh, what a cute garden! Look, it says Tangly Cottage!”  Then the speaker saw me and said. “Oh, it’s YOUR garden, no wonder, you garden for the whole community!”  That was nice.

Allan took two photos while dumping a wheelbarrow for me in the back garden:

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Primula vialii fallen over

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Cobwebs on the sprinklers show we have not yet had to use them this year.

I’m sure the windblown Ilwaco post office garden needs attention.  I just looked at it because it was so wet.  It was a winter clothes day because of a strong wind and I did not want to start out with damp sleeves and pants.

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I had a few lambs ear starts from cleaning up the port office garden’s sidewalk area after the storm.  The Freedom Market garden, which I have so far failed to make beautiful, seemed like a good spot for them.

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The curbside garden is attractive.

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Allan planting the lambs ears in the shop’s own garden, where they might not get stepped on when they resprout.

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I found several big dandelions in the curbside garden.

All the port gardens are on schedule for a thorough weeding next week before the July 1st fireworks show.

We had debris left over from Thursday’s post-storm clean up in Long Beach.  Our first stop was to dump it at city works.

The killdeer parents got very upset when we arrived because they have two little babies.

The mother birds tried to guide us away from the babies by fluttering and making a lot of noise and pretending to have a broken wing.

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Allan’s photo

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the broken wind feint?

Eventually, she seems to have realized we were not much of a threat so she rejoined her babies.

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Our plan today had been to do Long Beach and Ilwaco watering, but with the extra rain and with the strong, annoying wind, we decided to do two more sheltered gardens instead.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

At KBC, we could hear the wind roaring through the tops of the surrounding trees.  In the garden, all was more peaceful as we tidied up storm damage.  Mary and Denny had been on a trip for a dear friend’s birthday over the weekend, and the staff and other residents told them that the wind had been fierce and the place had been a mess of small fallen branches and leaves, all cleaned up by the time Mary and Denny returned home.

The main plant that I had expected to be affected by wind was the towering Thalictrum ‘Elin’.

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And indeed it was.

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had to cut some of it off

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Mary watches the struggle.

It took me and Allan and some long black string to truss it up in a way that I hoped looked moderately natural.  Allan went under the rugosa roses to find a strong enough branch to fasten the string loop to.

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It doesn’t look too unnatural.

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This rose had many rain sodden flowers and few leaves; I ended up choosing to cut it way back and fertilize with Dr Earth.

After a long work session, I took some photos for the KBC Facebook page.

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east gate

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Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

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birdbath view

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Allium nigrum

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driveway garden

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Right now is the beautiful time for lady’s mantle’s chartreuse flower sprays.

The Anchorage Cottages

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Our good friend Mitzu greets us.  (Allan’s photo)

Another somewhat sheltered garden is the Anchorage.  The wind does whip across the parking lot, but some moments of shelter can be found in the garden.  As we entered the driveway, I saw some sightline pruning needed to be done on a large shore pine by the street.  That led to some more pruning of dead branches on the chaemacyparis trees  by the road and to the removal of a dead willow, the whippy thin-leaved kind.

Beth and Mitzu all got involved in the pruning and hauling, and then Allan fertilized all the planters and window boxes while I weeded (and planted some starts from my bucket of extra lambs ears).

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two of four window boxes

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the other two; I try to coordinate the flowers with the signs.

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center courtyard

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New Dawn rose, would be quite perfect except she gets blackspot.

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north garden

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north garden

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Allan’s photo

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I pruned the rhododendron before Beth started to express worry about it reaching up to the gutters again.  I like it to provide some window privacy for that cottage.

Long Beach

On the way home, we assessed what work needed doing in Fifth Street Park and admired the lady’s mantle (Alchemilla mollis); I usually am off this plant until the all to brief period when it blooms.

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It is all chartreuse and frothy.

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hideous horsetail edging in the damp southwest bed.

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I asked Allan for a photo of the lady’s mantle on the east side of the park.

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evidence of rain

When we got home, I suddenly felt inspired to remove the bricks from the edge of a former garden bed in the nearby Norwood lawn so I could cross it off my work list.  I did not take my camera.  The garden bed is now defunct and will become part of the lawn; it is right inside a hedge and is competing too much with roots and has been allowed to go back to grass.  I used most of the bricks to make a little path to the faucet.

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one down on the work list

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Thursday, 15 June 2017

The storm did not veer away or fizzle out.  It appeared as predicted with 47 mph wind gusts at the port and 1.36 inches of rain (with three hours of rain left to go in the day as I write this).

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Skooter had no desire to go outside.

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reading

I finished my book.  (We’ll get to some garden photos after this reading time.)

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This is the same author whose reading we attended at Time Enough Books last week.

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author Kathleen Alcalá at Time Enough Books

The entire book is wonderful…except for one brief passage when the slim and beautiful author expresses her distaste for seeing overweight people buying pallets of food at Costco. (The day I read that paragraph, I in fact went shopping at Costco!)  At her reading, I mentioned to her that passage and gently suggested she read Body of Truth by Harriet Brown, and I hope she does.  I wrote it down for her.

Nevertheless, every other paragraph in the book gets my top rating.

Here are a few of my favourite parts.

About Michele Obama’s White House garden, and her book American Grown, in better days:

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I loved that The Deepest Roots mentions Minnie Rose Lovgreen’s Recipe for Raising Chickens, a book written by a Bainbridge Islander.  I used to own a copy and just loved it even though I don’t have chickens.  (I need to get that book for Melissa!)

Description of the author’s garden:

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I appreciate the mention of Jamaica Kinkaid.

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Kinkaid’s book is excellent.

In my teens and twenties, I used to frequently take the ferry to the town of Winslow on Bainbridge Island for a fun day out.  I doubt I would recognize Winslow now.

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I like the woman who just calmly read:

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for readers who are fungus fans:

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Think about this:

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I love the quiet in the garden, when no one in the neighborhood is mowing or string trimming!

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Sharing food garden at Town and Country Market:

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People have suggested that we have a food forest growing in Long Beach and Ilwaco.  The problem is that our windy weather is not very conducive to fruit trees on the ocean side of the Peninsula.  I was excited to Google and read about the town of “Incredible, edible Todmorden” in England.

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I want to grow these:

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It is useful to know that white camassia is poisonous to eat!

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She imagines a post apocalyptic world:

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I looked to my right and was pleased to see a wall of books.

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And those are just novels and memoirs; the gardening and nature books are on another wall.

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This is a beautiful book and I can think of several people who would love it as much as I do (and I have already bought a copy for one of them).

I looked back in my own archives and found these photos, from sometime between 1970 and 1973, of some trips that my friend Montana Mary and I took to Bainbridge Island.

on the ferry, with Seattle as the backdrop

We would go to the grocery store and buy apple beer, which was a non alcoholic drink that amused us.

Winslow, Eagle Harbor

Winslow by the ferry dock

I believe this is all built up by now.

We used always to walk down to this beach near the ferry dock.

We walked along a county road all the way to Fay Bainbridge State Park and back. It is now a busy road.

Mary on the quiet road.

That was quite a walk from Eagle Harbor. Mary and I often took long all day walks; back then I could live up to my last name of Walker.

Coming back to the present stormy afternoon, I checked the Heroncam.  Dark and rainy in Long Beach.

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I followed the book with a thorough catch up on reading my favourite blog, by Mr Tootlepedal.  If I read it a couple of weeks late, I can also enjoy the witty and informative comment section.

At 6 Pm, the wind had finally slowed.  We went out to check for storm damage and to assess whether or not we could enjoy the four day weekend I had so been hoping for.

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My rambling rose flowers had not blown off.

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Eryngium ‘Big Blue’

Port of Ilwaco

The gardens were not as damaged as I had feared.

The boatyard garden:

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Stipa gigantea had suffered.

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yesterday

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today

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still have red poppies

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On Howerton Avenue, the worse damage was to these sea thrift on the north side of the bookstore!

Long Beach

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welcome sign

The baskets did not look as bad as I had feared.  The leaves did not get turned to blackened mush like during the strong freak summer storm of late August 2015.

That storm has wind of 56 mph and more.  Long Beach probably had 35-40 mph this time and the damage was not severe.

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still looks good in what is probably the windiest planter

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The bigger Geranium ‘Rozanne’ were the most windblown of the planter plants.

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Had to deadhead these Dutch iris…

The south side of the police station was the biggest crisis.

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We fixed it so we could have tomorrow off.

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earlier this week

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today

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I did cut off the asphodel flower.

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Fifth Street Park not too bad.

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Allan’s photo

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protected baskets on north side

Port of Ilwaco Office

We saved this for last because I knew there would be some work there and I did not want to start out wet and cold.  I was thrilled to see the port staff had put up hooks to protect the hanging baskets by putting them on the north side of the building.

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a beautiful sight

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gale warning storm flags (Allan’s photo)

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south side

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after some staking and clipping and waterfalls falling on us from the deck above

home

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rain gauge plus water buckets I filled before the storm so the barrels could refill; rose flopped across the path

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Snails on my new tradescantia.  NOT cute.  I was not nice to them.

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yesterday

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today

Otherwise, very little damage.

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Recently transplanted paperbark maple is still happy.

Now we can have the four days off that I have been wanting, and I’m hoping for good enough weather to get a lot of weeding and planting done. Allan’s plans may be more adventurous.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 9 June 2017

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getting ready for work and admiring my golden Fremontodendron. I just read it has little hairs that are a skin irritant.

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We’d had lots of rain.

It had been raining hard for the first part of the morning.  We got a late start.

Our first little project was to replace some missing diascia in three of the Ilwaco planters.

Mike’s garden

A few blocks east, we did some string trimming, weeding, clipping, and planting (cosmos) in Mike’s garden.

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An urgent need for strimming along the outer edge

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These two sprawling conifers are slowly dying. Allan pulled lilac suckers out of one of them. Lilacs are bad that way.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo. The one without the lilac problem is also dying out in the middle.

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Oriential poppies (Allan’s photo)

Rain suddenly absolutely poured on us but we kept going.

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Mike’s garden with a rain spot.

Port of Ilwaco

We weeded several of the curbside gardens and I added a very few Cosmos ‘Double Click’ to the port office garden.

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ by Ilwaco Pavilion (Allan’s photo)

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my favourite bed (Allan’s photo)

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curbside painting (Allan’s photo)

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view to the south of Port Office garden

While Allan kept weeding, I got our check at Time Enough Books.

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Scout, staff greeter

Bookstore owner Karla says she can tell if a friend is coming by Scout’s wiggling and wagging tail.

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at the cash register

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tomorrow’s author reading

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When I emerged, I saw someone weeding with Allan.

It was Todd.  We had a chat about yesterday’s plant shopping trip.

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plant talk

Long Beach

We did not have to water the planters or the street trees!

Feeling more confident by finding all the plants still living in the Sid Snyder Drive planter, we added a couple more.

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squeezed some Cosmos ‘Double Click’ into Fifth Street Park; Captain Bob’s Cathy told me she saw me but could tell I was “on a mission”.

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Allan planted a couple of Asclepias syriaca in the damp SW corner of the park, an area where it can behave aggressively if that is what it likes to do.  It can fight it out with the hesperantha.

I had meant to get to the police station garden before the farmers market opened to make sure none of the roses had flopped.

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Oops, two hours after the market opened.  (Allan’s photo)

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Vet Field (Allan’s photo)

Later, it was a little overwhelming to plant cosmos and to weed at Vet Field because the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market first market of the year (Fridays, 3-6 PM) was in session.  The corner bed still looks sad because of last week’s trampling.  The rain had delayed us so that we had not managed to make it there before market time.

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trying to make a sad garden better

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Later in the summer, the market will have enough vendors to encircle the field.

We bought a little sign from a little boy who was quite the salesman.

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Allan’s photo, with the boy’s dad

The boy immediately turned his earnings of the day back into the local economy by buying a bag of kettle corn.

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Allan’s photo

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more rain while I added a plant to one more planter on the main street (Allan’s photo)

The rain is making me so happy.

We finally got out to weed the planters on the Bolstad beach approach.

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I like the dark leaved sea thrift in a pool of golden marjoram.

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The very blue grass is Elymus, which has been mostly pushed out by the plain green European beach grass which was planted to stabilize the dunes. (Allan’s photo)

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We skipped this planter in a deep rain puddle.

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lots of rugosa roses in bloom, pink ones and white ones.

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one of the planters; out here, they have to be drought tolerant.

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I hope soon to find time to weed out here again.

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especially will enjoy weeding the emptier areas

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And here will be a satisfying spot, especially because we can add some mulch.

Maybe next year the poppies will be more successful with some mulch added.

On the way to dump debris, we checked on the nice repair that the city crew had done on the Minnie Culbertson Park garden bed:

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emergency watering LAST week with rotten rail road ties showing

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today!

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We pruned so the plaque shows.

at home

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rain gauge

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evening light

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Acer campestre

 

 

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Tuesday, 16 May 2017

After a morning of rain and wind, as predicted, we had a brief break in the weather.  Allan decided to mow the thin, tall lawn over at Mary N’s house.  Even though we aren’t really a mowing business, we have taken on a couple of such jobs on our own block.

Meanwhile, the light on our garden suddenly became gorgeous.

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Allan’s garden, from the front porch

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My hardy begonia (from Windcliff) has spread thoroughly in this box.

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the back garden

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I love the splash of white Miscanthus.

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We’d had this much rain since yesterday.

Suddenly, the sky darkened and hail pelted down.

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Skooter was taken aback.

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I felt bad for Allan, mowing two doors down.

Allan’s photos at his mowing job nearby:

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We had just taken this on.  It won’t be allowed to get this long again.

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before

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It took two passes, at a high and then medium setting.

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the storm! from undercover

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after

Those barberries are for the chop sooner than you might think.

Meanwhile, I had decided to be practical and propose that we pick up some plants today instead of immersing myself in a good book from the library…

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Allan agreed with my productive plan, so off we went to

The Planter Box.

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a hardy begonia which I think I must acquire

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ferns

You may recall that a couple of days ago, I was touting the great gardening tool called the Zen Digger, Ho Mi, Korean Hand Plow, and E-Z Digger.  Planter Box has it.

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Allan’s photo

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Teresa totals up (Allan’s photo)

On the way home, after buying a pin for his boat rudder at Dennis Company, Allan took a photo of a beautiful scene in Coulter Park.  The loss of that pin on our recent Black Lake rally day had turned his sailing afternoon into a rowing afternoon.

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the old Clamshell Railroad depot at Coulter Park

Ilwaco

We drove by the Ilwaco boatyard garden.  I was thrilled to see that the horsetail had not made a big comeback, so weeding was not urgent.

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boatyard visual check up (without getting out of the van)

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At home, I sorted plants in the garage.

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Allan was inspired to go back to Mary’s garden to begin the removal of three mean barberries.

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Barberries make weeding the quackgrass in this bed just miserable.

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welding gloves

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Now just the stumps remain to be dealt with.  Hydrangeas are the goal.

One of the main inspirations for this big chop is that this week, we had room in our wheelie bin for the debris.

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wheelbie bin full of mean stuff

[pickled fish] restaurant

In the evening, we joined Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) for a special weekly garden meeting to celebrate Melissa’s birthday.

I was impressed and kind of jealous of the planters as we entered the Adrift Hotel.  They are stuffed full of cool plants, some of which are hard to find for purchase around here.

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Adrift Hotel (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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This one made me especially jealous; I think that is Ribes brocklebankii.

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good use of a Phormium.  Phormiums don’t make me jealous, though.

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more common, still interesting

They have the budget to switch out their planters frequently.  Our local nurseries are good, and yet there is not the audience for cool collectors’ plants to support that sort of plant availability here.  I’ve noticed when ultra cool plants appear at our local shops, they often just sit until I buy them.

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drinks menu at the [pickled fish]; I had the starvation alley ginger cosmo.

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Melissa and Dave arrive (Allan’s photo)

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birthday girl (Allan’s photo)

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cranberry lemonade (Allan’s photo)

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ginger cosmo (Allan’s photo)

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The memory of this scrumptuous Moroccan chick pea stew makes my mouth water.

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Allan’s clam chowder

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Melissa’s starter salad

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a place for tasty pizzas: margherita

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fennel sausage pizza

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the view

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skillet cookie dessert

For Melissa’s birthday:

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a birthday card by Don Nisbett

And a t shirt made from Don’s Crabby Gardener design:

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The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett (T shirt was personalized with an M on the seed packet)

And this excellent gardening book:

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I think we may be the only gardeners on the peninsula who actually do genuine hellstrip, curbside gardens (at the Port, and the beach approach).  However, the book is excellent in suggesting ideas and plants for droughty areas, and the photos are a treat.

We are now due for several days of dry weather.  Let the planting begin, while the soil is still damp!

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Thursday, 4 May 2017

By the time we went to work, the anti-health care vote had happened, and I felt furious and disgusted on behalf of the old and the poor, reading on the way to work about the projected cuts to health care for disabled school children, the proposed sharp rise in premiums for folks in their fifties and early sixties,  and more.  I pondered again just exactly how we are supposed to work harder in order to pay higher premiums.

Some might think I could give up my workdays in my own garden and use that time to take on more clients.  Many a year at my old garden I just had to think sadly, “It’s another lost year for my garden,” as I spent seven days a week working for other people. I just don’t have it in me physically any more to pushpushpush at for 20 work days in a row as I used to do.

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“Push Push Push, all the way, all the time, right on down the line.”  (Twilight Zone, A Stop at Willoughby)

My former partner and I used to quote that Twilight Zone boss’s slogan to each other as we worked and worked and worked.

Today was a workday, as Allan and I were still pushing to get the Long Beach and Ilwaco gardens looking good for McCarthy Day-I-mean-Loyalty-Day weekend.  You can read some history about L Day here.  “In 1955 Congress passed a resolution designating May 1 of that year as Loyalty Day. It was the height of McCarthyism and an anti-Communist red scare in America.”  That was my birth year, in fact.  I have read that there are very few town that still have Loyalty Day celebrations.  Long Beach’s parade is a mostly cute and surprisingly long one, with lots of baton twirlers, marching bands, some llamas and horses and basset hounds.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

The dredge was getting pressure washed right next to where we needed to weed.  That did not stop us.

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Allan’s photo; I started where I had quit from exhaustion yesterday evening.

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I hope this one Anthriscus ‘Ravenswing’ reseeds like mad (dark foliage behind the tulip).  (Allan’s photo)

Yesterday, the weather was almost 70 F and some cool misty overspray would have been welcome.  We got the boatyard weeding done at last.

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looking back; we had come a long way, from the north end far in the distance.

Home again for a moment, Allan took a photo from the kitchen window of the rampant wild cucumber vine.  He says he has been training it.

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outside

We weeded and deadheaded at city hall in Long Beach, intending to follow that task with a good weeding of Coulter Park.  Almost as soon as we began city hall, we heard loud thunder and decided it would be a good time to deliver the plant cheque to…

The Basket Case Greenhouse.

By the time we got there, serious rain had begun.

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heading for refuge from the rain; Darrell told me how his grandma had been struck by lightning more than once!

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Allan’s photo.  I like this, because my liberal heart was bleeding today.

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and….crabby…

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There are still a few callistemon left.  I’m getting them all if they are still there next time I go!

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Check out time.  (Pink petunias were not mine.)  Had stayed out of the rain as long and productively as possible.

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At Coulter Park, we worked in a storm of wind, thunder, rain, and pink petals.

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The back end of this park continues to be a challenge where the roses are, because of salmonberry and bindweed coming under the fence.

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Salmonberry running UNDER the roses and then popping up.  Everything is thorny and difficult.

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the horror of a grass infested rose

That particular grass WAS the variegated bulbous oat grass that I used to like so much, till I found out how quickly it reverts to green, and how its bulbous roots like to migrate.

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Allan won that battle.

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There’s a dead columnar conifer along the fence, too, and two other conifers toward the front seem to be dying.

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The south back side, away from the fence of invasives, is doing just fine.

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Allan’s photo

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just about to leave the park to dump debris

I checked Dark Sky.  It was discouraging.  “Heavy rain stopping in 30 minutes, starting again 11 minutes later.”

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I thought we could stand to do one more thing in the rain, so I scooped up six buckets of mulch at city works…

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…and we returned to the front corner of Coulter Park, where lots of people will line up for the parade on Sunday.

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Last week:

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a quick fix

I looked at Dark Sky again.  Stopping in 30 minutes and then overcast?

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We decided to go to Abbracci Coffee Bar.  On the quest for parking, we passed the little popout and stopped there for another quick fix.  I said it would take two minutes.

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before

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12 cold, wet, and windy minutes later

And then: Abbracci

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Allan’s photo.  Abbracci is just south of the Fun Rides.

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shelter from the storm

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treats

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more treats available than on our first visit!

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and they have Pink Poppy Bakery treats now!

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the wonderful owners Bernardo and Anthony  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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drenched

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We like the floral art.

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The other customers were a knitter, two chess players, and a woman reading a book in the other window seat.

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waiting out the rain

Even better, we acquired a bucket of coffee grounds for my compost pile!

With the rain stopped, I headed out to deadhead a block worth of planters while Allan went to weed and deadhead at Veterans Field (main stage for the festivities following Sunday’s parade).

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tree garden outside of Abbracci: still lots of narcissi for parade day

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and bright tulips

Guess what, there should be TEN tulips in each of those planters.  Broken off stems showed that five had been stolen.

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only five left, dang blang it.

Does someone think I won’t notice or care?  I DO notice.  Plus, these were special tulips from Brent and Becky’s bulbs.

Allan came over to help me finish the little park behind Lewis and Park Square, where the city crew had dug a trench at the lawn’s edge, surprising me with an unexpected clean up job.  He pulled bindweed from the rugosa roses on the south side of the police station, where many will walk by to go to Vet Field on Sunday, and then we went over the two Vet Field beds again for more tiny weeds.

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Note to self: Monarda is swallowing this Jade Frost Eryngium; maybe next time, I can move it.

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Someone had carefully filled a tulip with some grape hyacinth foliage, making a fanciful flower.  (Allan’s photo)

We finished the Vet Field gardens as this returned:

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But in driving from Abbracci to Vet Field, Allan had found an emergency by one of the parking lot berms.

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Whhhaaaat???

A tourist information trailer had been parked next to the weedy south berm.  All we usually know is the date of each festival, but the intricacies of what the city crew does is left for us to discover on our own.  I decided we simply had to do some weeding.

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Allan’s photo

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the biggest weed of all (Allan’s photo)

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6:20 PM

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7:11 PM

One more debris dump trip ended the work day.

home

At home, I could have erased one berm from the work board.  We have the north one about fifteen minutes from being done, and the south one is over halfway done.  That surely counts as one done…but I did not feel like finagling on the board.  I did finally get to erase the boatyard!

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Everywhere Skooter sits for awhile lately ends up looking like an explosion of cat fur.

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front porch from today

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And yet here he is, still whole and fluffy!

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and Frosty

I could hardly believe my last check on the weather for tomorrow, showing heavy rain all day with 30 mph winds.  No!  This means we would have to do the planter deadheading in Long Beach on late Saturday afternoon among throngs of visitors.  Oh please.  Just give us a few hours of workable weather tomorrow so we can finish the two berms and the deadheading, and please spare the tulips from 30 mph winds that would blow them all apart.

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Wednesday, 2 May, part two

After working two jobs in the rain, we drove north of Oysterville on a mission to see the always impressive Oysterville garden’s tulip display.

Arriving in Oysterville, we took the scenic loop.

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Peter and Linda’s garden


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arriving at our destination in increasingly heavy rain

THE Oysterville garden

Join us in our usual walk around the garden that looks as fine in rain as it does on a perfect day.  I kept my camera pointed down between photos and felt very lucky to not get a water spot on the lens.

We walk along the roadside verge, looking in….

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo

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with tetranpanax and camassia (Allan’s photo)

We turn in at the driveway…

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This southerly bed will have plants taller than me come summer.


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Allan’s photo


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the glorious terrace


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at the back of the garden

The gardener puts on the crisp lawn edge with an old fashioned half moon edger.

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the allée of Hydrangea ‘Incrediball’


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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


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onto the north lawn


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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo


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yellow Welsh poppies


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woodsy garden west of the lawn


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rodgersia and camassia


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Allan’s photo


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primulas


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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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returning to the front, to see the tulips from the inside.

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo

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a trio of golden barberries

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo

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Erysimum (Allan’s photo)

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honesty and digiplexus

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


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lunaria (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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from across the street

That opulent display of tulips was well worth the drive and the drenching stroll; in fact, I did not even notice the sensation of rain (other than being aware my camera was wet yet again).

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