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Posts Tagged ‘McCormick-Stephens garden’

Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Ilwaco

before leaving home: the Eleagnus by our driveway

before leaving home: the Eleagnus by our driveway

the Ilwaco Post Office garden...

the Ilwaco Post Office garden…

...missing half its dark lilies...

…missing half its dark lilies…

The picture is not what I had in mind before an unfortunate soul fell into the garden last week; there were as many dark maroon lilies planted as yellow ones….Ah, well.

Today, we had a plan to deliver some plants to Steve and John before work.  On the way, we stopped at

The Basket Case Greenhouse

basket

….where I had to rescue, by buying, one more ‘Chocolate Tip’ Sanguisorba, and one more variegated ‘Dali Marble’ sanguisorba.

Why aren't people buying this stunner?

Why aren’t people buying this stunner?

or this one, Dali Marble, with variegated leaves.

or this one, Dali Marble, with variegated leaves.

Sanguisorbas are so Piet Oudolfy!  Their only drawbacks are that deer nibble the flowers, and that they seem to need frequent watering to look their best.  I wonder how that works out in the meadow gardens that Mr. Oudolf creates.

Steve and John’s Bayside Garden

A couple of weeks ago, I had purchased a bright gold chameacyparis.  As soon as I got it home, I realized that I had no place for it (as I don’t want evergreens or evergolds to block my port view in winter, and am pretty much filled up along the sides).  I knew I had bought it to make my garden more Steve-and-John-y, so I decided that the tree should be part of their garden.  I don’t really have the room to plant the specimen trees that they do.

Thus, we visited them before work, we took time for a good tour of their great garden.

When we arrived, they were in the garden, of course.

looking east up the driveway

looking east up the driveway; the house is on the shore of Willapa Bay

This bold little fellow greeted at the garage.

This bold little fellow greeted at the garage.

brighteyes

up and down the garage door frame!

up and down the garage door frame!

arcs of gold

arc of gold

looking north

looking north

looking north

looking north

note the rhododendron still blooming....one of the originals to the site

note the rhododendron still blooming….one of the originals to the site

This garden was once part of Clarke rhododendron nursery and even Steve Clarke can’t identify all the rhodos on it, some of which are, I believe, unnamed crosses propagated by his father.

bed

the veg and dahlia patch

the veg and dahlia patch, next to the pumphouse

dahlia appreciation

dahlia appreciation

dahlia2

pump house roof

pump house roof

To my surprise, these plants needs lots of water to stay plump and happy.

To my surprise, these plants needs lots of water to stay plump and happy.

At this point, most people would have had a look at the bay, just past a large camellia.  I was so engrossed in plants that I did not even notice if the tide was high or low.

looking up at that rhododendron

looking up at that rhododendron

Right about at this point, maybe from having looked up into the sky, I managed to trip over virtually nothing and fall flat on my face with a screech.  On the way down, I got my iPhone and my camera out of the way, and the grass cushioned my fall like a fluffy mattress.  It was kind of embarrassing, which I am sure is how the guy who fell into the post office garden felt.  Perhaps it was a sign I should feel more sympathy and quit fretting over my lilies! It would have been extra ironic if I had fallen on some plants.  My next few photos were blurry, so I must have been more shaken than I wanted to let on.  You’ll miss out on a few choice plants…

but I did manage to get photos of the hostas.

but I did manage to get photos of the hostas.

more hostas, just a tad blurry

more hostas, just a tad blurry

sunlight through rhododendron

sunlight through rhododendron

the newest garden bed, with a pleasant sit spot

the newest garden bed, with a pleasant sit spot

Let’s have a closer look at that island bed.

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

Berberis 'Orange Rocket'

Berberis ‘Orange Rocket’

a slim, dark-stemmed hebe

a slim, dark-stemmed hebe

John himself

John himself

This salvia? came back, and is running a bit.  Is it a salvia?  Do they do that?

This salvia? came back, and is running a bit. Is it a salvia? Do they do that?

We think it might be Salvia guaranitica.  Later in the season, we will all know for sure.  I wish mine had been that vigorous.

across the pond...Look for the tall Eremerus (foxtail lily)

looking north across the pond…Look for the tall yellow Eremerus (foxtail lily) against a green backdrop

I was assured that my Eremerus might size up eventually, as this one did not do much till now, its second year.

across the road to the south of the pond

across the road to the south of the pond

The plants are all thriving on water from the new sprinkler system, installed by Steve Clarke and our new friends Dave and Melissa.  The sprinklers are saving Steve and John hours of watering time.

The sprinklers are saving Steve and John hours of watering time.

Arneson Flame azalea

Arneson Flame azalea

Steve and John guide us to a newly developed area.

Steve and John guide us to a newly developed area.

They are winning new areas from the clutches of salal.  I know how much effort that takes The new area has already moved out of range of the new sprinklers, as always seems to happen when one expands. 

This goes right up to the deeply set tidal stream at the south edge of the estate.

This goes right up to the deeply set tidal stream at the south edge of the estate.

I tried to make an iPhone note of all the rhododendron specimens that we admired, and yet I have come up short on some.  They are worth admiring, with or without names.  Any errors in naming are mine.

rhodod2

such glossy leaves

such glossy leaves

new growth

new growth

I believe this one is 'Ever Red'.

I believe this one is ‘Ever Red’.

Rhododendron macabeanum

Rhododendron macabeanum

Rhododendron quinquefolium

Rhododendron quinquefolium

This mahonia is from the Dan Hinkley Monrovia collection.

This mahonia is from the Dan Hinkley Monrovia collection.

more striking new foliage

more striking new foliage on R. ‘Starbright Champagne’

Rhododendron 'Wine and Roses'

Rhododendron ‘Wine and Roses’

The one below is my favourite, and apparently I was so gaga over it that I did not note the name.  I must immediately email Steve because it is one I now especially want to find. (Later:  I remember now that he said he could not come up with the name immediately, and here’s why.  He emailed it to me:  Rhododendron degronianum ssp. yakushimanum x pachysanthum.)

silvery!

Rhododendron degronianum ssp. yakushimanum x pachysanthum

At first, I feared to touch the leaves in case the indumentum would rub off.  Although it does come off the lower leaves, it was firmly affixed to the new leaves, which were soft like lambs ears.  It is the most beautiful rhodo I have ever seen.

just stunning

Rhododendron degronianum ssp. yakushimanum x pachysanthum

On the way back to the house, we admired a large old Kalmia (mountain laurel).

Kalmia

Kalmia

Kalmia flowers

Kalmia flowers

Hydrangea quercifolia

Hydrangea quercifolia

AKA oakleaf hydrangea, just coming into flower

AKA oakleaf hydrangea, just coming into flower

Pittosporum

Pittosporum

a red kalmia

a dark red kalmia

close up Kalmia

close up Kalmia

heuchera and coleus

heuchera and coleus and euphorbia

mahonia (Oregon grape)

mahonia (Oregon grape)

hosta nestled into mahonia

hosta nestled into mahonia

hosta3

mahonia berries

mahonia berries

Rhododendron 'Ring of Fire'

Rhododendron ‘Ring of Fire’

(I just learned last night while watching Walk the Line that June Carter, not Johnny Cash, wrote Ring of Fire.)

such well defined plants, each with its own place...

such well defined plants, each with its own place…

south side of driveway

south side of driveway, hebe and lonicera

I presented the gold chamaecyparis and three small Panicum ‘Northwind’, and Steven and John gave us a Rhododendron ‘Capistrano’ — “yellow blooms on an eventual three-footer”.  I am most pleased as one of my mother’s favourite rhododendrons was a smallish yellow one (which is now at Golden Sands, where we went later on—next post—and which was, surprisingly, still in bloom there.  (Sorry, I forgot to photograph it.)  We did have to get on to work, so we made our departure.

Escallonias line the east side of the lower driveway.

Escallonias line the east side of the lower driveway.

Escallonia in bloom

Escallonia in bloom

Next: one of the shortest work weeks ever, because we are leaving on the 24th for the Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend.  By the time you read this, we should have returned with lots of garden tour photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 28 March 2015

Empty Bowls event

Strangely, I found myself in bed and falling sleep by 1 AM instead of 2 last night so was awake at the bright hour of 9 AM!  This would have been a shock to Allan so I checked my email and Facebook for half an hour.  Thus, we were at the Empty Bowls event by 11 AM.  From the event page:

This annual event brings handmade bowls created by local artists and elementary students together with handmade soups and bread made by local restaurants to help fund local food service organizations. Each year bowls are made and at the event are sold for $10 each. With that donation you get a lunch of soup and bread. After the event you keep your bowl to remind you of all the empty bowls in the world. Open to the public.

This is part of a national outreach to educate and empower communities through art and understanding.

Empty Bowls is held at the Peninsula Church Center, which has a tidy garden outside.

Empty Bowls is held at the Peninsula Church Center, which has a tidy garden outside.

The rose garden must be lovely in summertime.

The rose garden must be lovely in summertime.

Inside, bowls were still being added to the display.  It was hard to choose!

Inside, bowls were still being added to the display. It was hard to choose!

Many of the bowls at this event are made by grade school children.  I asked local potter and event organizer Karen Brownlee if that is unusual, and she said yes, most of the similar events around the country have more “grown up” bowls (my words).  There are plenty of “grown up” bowls mixed in to the choices at our local event.  The children’s bowls add a great deal of charm and are a great way to introduce kids to this mix of art and community.

picking a bowl

picking a bowl

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Several different restaurants donated soup.

Several local restaurants donated soup.

Just last night on Facebook, I saw Karen put out a request for a donation of butter to make the bread better.  The butter arrived, and the bread was rustic and delicious.

bread and butter

bread and butter

Our bowls (you can buy more than one).

Our bowls (you can buy more than one).

In the background, above, Karen’s spouse is bringing our soup, as the event includes table service.  It was later pointed out to me that the two green and yellow bowls that I chose are in the colours of an Oregon sportsball team.  One even has the letter O in side!  The completely went over my head as I don’t follow sports.  I believe our good friend Susie is a fan of the team known as the Oregon Ducks (but I won’t part with my pretty green and blue bowl!)  Allan always likes to get one with a bird’s head.

Our soup arrives!

Our soup arrives!

Allan's egg drop soup and his bowls.  I wanted the red one so he got an extra as well as his usual bird selection.

Allan’s egg drop soup and his bowls. I wanted the red one so he got an extra as well as his usual bird selection.

We were graced by the presence of local artist Rose Power, who sat with us.  I had figured out (by asking around) that she was the woman at yesterday’s art event who had such nice things to say (in a delightful English accent) about our gardening.

We had to tear ourselves away from the good company in order to begin the workday. As we left, we met a most handsome dog who was just quietly lying outside.  He stood up and licked my hand when I sweet talked him, then wandered off so I guess he had just come to visit where a crowd of people gathered.

a handsome boy

a handsome boy

The Basket Case Greenhouse 

Our second pre-work stop was at the Basket Case Greenhouse, which was on our way to stops three and four.  I needed just one thing, a bag of potting soil for planting sweet peas at home, and also took the opportunity to snag some new photos for the Basket Case Facebook page.

Walter: Allan's photo

Walter: Allan’s photo

red Geum and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

red Geum and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Papaver 'Wonderland Orange'

Papaver ‘Wonderland Orange’

Fred and me...somehow I ended up buying a few plants.

Fred and me…somehow I ended up buying a few plants.

I didn’t get much, just a red Monarda for Jo, and one for the red white and blue Veterans Field garden.

When we looked over at the van, we could see Shadow the poodle all the way inside, and Walter had been thinking about getting in.  This is not surprising for Shadow, as this used to be “his” van before we bought it from Fred and Nancy (thus VASTLY improving our lives) in autumn of 2013.

Shadow is in there.

Shadow is in there.

They've been called back to the greenhouse by Fred and Nancy.

They’ve been called back to the greenhouse by Fred and Nancy.

The Bayside Garden

Next, we went a bit further north, past our first actual work destination, to deliver a lovely spider azalea which we’d gotten at Monkey Business Nursery for Steve and John.

I got two of these spider azaleas, one for me, and one for Steve and John if they want one.

At Monkey Business 101: I got two of these spider azaleas, one for me, and one for Steve and John.

Here it is in bloom.

Here it is in bloom, and here’s an article about it.

near the front door to the bayside house

near the front door to the bayside house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house with Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira’ behind a Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Sunlight Lace’.

three rhododendrons

Rhododendron pachysanthum, in a bed of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (Kinnikinnick)

by the front door

by the front door

When Steve and John invited us in for coffee and a slice of a peanut butter and chocolate “Elvis” cake, we could not resist.  (They make an excellent and flavourful cup of coffee and John is an accomplished baker.)  We then had a brief tour of part of the garden.  You may notice some lines of dug up soil, as an irrigation system is being installed by renowned local landscaper and rhododendron expert Steve Clarke’s capable team.

garden

by the driveway

rhodo

Rhododendron campylogynum Myrtilloides.

detail

detail of Rhododendron campylogynum Myrtilloides.

rhodo3

Rhododendron ‘Capistrano’ (has a yellow tint that the camera ignored) 

a prostrate form of taxus backed with a Daphne, still blooming (as it was on our last visit)

a prostrate form of taxus backed with a Daphne, still blooming (as it was on our last visit three weeks ago)

garden 4

There’s that stunning white variegated Euphorbia ‘Tasmanian Tiger’ gathering the light.

Hostas just emerging.

Hostas just emerging.

Steve and John had recently visited The English Nursery in Seaview, whose owner, Dirk Sweringen, sells an impressive variety of hostas.

a garden of well defined shapes

a garden of well defined shapes

garden5

garden6

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

Pittosporum

Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’

moss2

the woodland, which Steve and John have painstakingly edited for beauty

moss

a natural cup of moss

a natural cup of moss

Have I told you that this garden is going to open for touring on May 2?

rhodietour

We had to get to work, and Steve and John were off to the art show in Long Beach.  Our first work destination was just a couple of blocks to the south, where we got a yard of Soil Energy mulch and headed to our first job.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply:  Mike bringing us a scoop

Peninsula Landscape Supply: Mike bringing us a scoop (Allan’s photo)

They have some handsome heucheras for sale.

They have some handsome heucheras for sale.

The Boreas Inn

I had one major goal for today, to get that yard of Soil Energy spread at the Boreas and then to plant two plants and some poppy seeds in Long Beach.  While Allan got the mulch moving, I delivered the red bee balm plant to Jo’s, had a brief visit with her and little dog Coco, and then hightailed it back to the Boreas to get to work at last.

It went swimmingly and by the time we were almost done, my ambition for the day had increased.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and weeding

and weeding some of the horrid creeping Jenny out (it’s too invasive)

hard at it

hard at it.  Soon weather will permit the cushions will be brought out for guests to lounge.

IMG_1997 - Version 2

Boreas lawn beds

Boreas lawn beds yesterday

and today, raised up with muclh

and today, raised up with mulch

I always wish for these beds to be level with the lawn, if not raised a little higher.  We might finally have almost achieved that.

Mission accomplished.

Mission accomplished.

The garden suite garden also got mulched.

The garden suite garden also got mulched.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The lawn beds, finally level with the lawn (for now, at least)

The lawn beds, finally level with the lawn (for now, at least)

Buddha had snail earrings today.

Buddha had snail earrings today. (Allan’s photo)

and then….back to

Peninsula Landscape Supply (again)

Colleen scooping Soil Energy

Colleen scooping Soil Energy

and dumping it into our little trailer, which holds just a yard and a bit.

and dumping it into our little trailer, which holds just a yard and a bit.

Instead of planting two plants and some seeds in Long Beach, my goal had changed to mulching the Port office garden and an area in my garden and then finishing the little gravel project at the Port office garden.

Ilwaco

On the way to Ilwaco, I added to my goal the planting of sweet peas at our Ilwaco post office garden, as having some mulch to add would help them along.

post office garden, before

post office garden, before

after

after

I DO hope I have some luck with sweet peas in this spot.  The last two years I have tried and failed for various reasons: lousy soil, not enough water, snails.

Post office garden today

Post office garden today, after some work

with Tulip 'Green Star'

with Tulip ‘Green Star’

With that done, we drove to the port office and added soil to make the garden fluffy and happy.

Port Office before

Port Office before

after mulching

after mulching

just across the lawn from our mulching job

just across the lawn from our mulching job

Next, we applied the rest of the Soil Energy at home…

on a mulch mission at home

on a mulch mission at home

filling in an edge by the bogsy wood

raising an edge by the bogsy wood

raising an edge by the bogsy wood

every last scoop of precious mulch

every last scoop of precious mulch; Allan kept the wheelbarrows filled.

And then we went back to the port, got some gravel from their supply, and finished making the backsplash for the office garden.

view from near the gravel pile

view from near the gravel pile

gull

gravel and mulch both applied!

gravel and mulch both applied!

After all that, I declared tomorrow a day off.  I had been able to erase more from the work board than I had expected.  And perhaps while walking around my own garden, I had been so horrified by the amount of weeds that I just had to have a day off.  I just hope I get more done than just “piddlefarting around the garden.”

plants need to be planted

plants need to be planted

The shotweed is shocking!

The shotweed is shocking!

Horsetail is popping up all over!

Horsetail is popping up all over!

and I must pull the dangblang touch-me-not!

and I must pull the dangblang touch-me-not!

Pretty things soothe my anxiety about the garden:

a marmalade Heuchera

a marmalade Heuchera

epimidium

epimidium

Smokey walking with me and flopping down in front of me

Smokey walking with me and flopping down in front of me

fringed tulip 'Cummins'

fringed tulip ‘Cummins’

the garden boat

the garden boat

The Ann Lovejoy

The Ann Lovejoy

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

Oh!! A lost ho mi in the mini scree garden!

Oh!! A lost ho mi in the mini scree garden!

tulips and gold acanthus

tulips and gold acanthus

a sentimental hosta given to me by Mary Fluaitt before she moved away

a sentimental hosta given to me by Mary Fluaitt before she moved away

Where Allan found the energy to mow our lawn AND Nora’s tonight I just cannot imagine.

allan

But he did.  I went inside and caught up on the Tootlepedal and Miserable Gardener blogs.

Mission accomplished: a new red bowl for tea bags!

Mission accomplished: a new red bowl for tea bags!

and a much decreased work list.  Tomorrow if I do my own sweet peas, I can erase sweet peas altogether.

and a much decreased work list. Tomorrow if I do my own sweet peas, I can erase sweet peas altogether.

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Saturday, 7 March 2015

Because Seaside gardener Pam Fleming was on the Peninsula for a consultation, we were all (Pam, me, Allan) invited to lunch at Steve and John’s and a late winter tour of their garden on the bay.  You may remember it from previous posts such as “A Bayside Garden” “Bayside Garden in Springtime“, “A Bayside Garden Interlude“. “September in the Bayside Garden” and “McCormick-Stephens Garden” (on the garden tour).

On the way north, I admired our pot of tulips at the Ilwaco post office…

starring Tulip sylvestris

starring Tulip sylvestris

and we stopped at the Basket Case as they had their first shipment of perennials for the year…

Basket Case, the perennial greenhouse

Basket Case, the perennial greenhouse

including some plants that I especially admire:

Viola 'Etain'

Viola ‘Etain’

Hebe 'Boughton Dome'

Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’

Stachys 'Primrose Heron'

Stachys ‘Primrose Heron’

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

and three cultivars of santolina.

and three cultivars of santolina.

And then on to lunch with people I admire.

John and Steve’s Bayside Garden

When we arrived at the entry drive, I had Allan drop me off so I could take some photos of the sweep of red twig dogwoods along the lower driveway.

Cornus alba

Cornus alba

cornus

cornusalba

I walked up the long drive, cheating by getting an advance peek of the plants alongside it.

an early blooming rhododendron

an early blooming rhododendron

an edgeworthia that aroused envy because mine died...

an edgeworthia that aroused envy because mine died…

a freshly mulched bed

a freshly mulched bed

Allan's photo of me taking the above photo

Allan’s photo of me taking the above photo (I think)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the top of the driveway

the top of the driveway

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Coral Bark maples by the front door

Coral Bark maples by the front door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I carried in a bouquet of hellebores and a few narcissi.

a fistful of hellebores

a fistful of hellebores (Allan’s photo)

Me and John, who was putting the final touches on dessert.

Me and John, who was putting the final touches on dessert.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Pam had already arrived.  We found her sitting with Steve in the living room talking plants.

pam

After some coffee and plant talk, lunch was served.  Chef Steve had prepared spicy prawns and salsa to be rolled in butter lettuce.

lunch

John takes a seat.  The view is of Willapa Bay.

The second course was orange beef, as good as a fine Thai restaurant.

The second course was orange beef, as good as a fine Thai restaurant.

John had baked a scrumptious coconut buttermilk cake.

John had baked a scrumptious coconut buttermilk cake.

After more coffee, and interesting talk about plants, and garden shows, and the Sylvia Beach Hotel, and about Chess and Mani, the purebred border collies, we emerged into the chilly afternoon sunshine to tour the garden.

the coral bark maple

one of the coral bark maples

Allan's photo: the stroll begins

Allan’s photo: the stroll begins

Sweet scent wafted from this Osmanthus.

Sweet scent wafted from this Osmanthus.

closer

closer

and from this nearby Daphne

and from this nearby Daphne

closer

closer

I envied the handsome Euphorbia 'Tasmanian Tiger' as...mine plotzed.

I envied the handsome Euphorbia ‘Tasmanian Tiger’ as…mine plotzed.  It’s backed with Pieris, and the Daphne is to the top right.

Pam and I admiring the Euphorbia, Allan's photo

Pam and I admiring the Euphorbia, Allan’s photo

Steve and John had just replanted tender succulents, sent by a California friend, on their pumphouse roof.

roof

John gives a sense of scale as we worry over cold nights.

John gives a sense of scale as we worry over cold nights.

We begin our walk through the shady garden down to the sunny field to the west.

On the way: Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant)

On the way: Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant)

closer

closer

The garden holds a large collection of young rhododendrons, along with old well established ones.

The garden holds a large collection of young rhododendrons, along with old well established ones.

Backlighting for a cryptomeria.

Backlighting for a cryptomeria.

I thought I heard this IDed as Cryptomeria arachnoides...like a spider...but I find it as Araucarioides...I guess.  Pam says it gets big.

I thought I heard this IDed as Cryptomeria arachnoides…like a spider…but I find it as Araucarioides…I guess. Pam says it gets big.

a baby rhodo, with boot for scale (accidentally)

a baby rhodo ‘Queen Bee’, with boot for scale (accidentally)

Rhodendron 'Ever Red'

Rhodendron ‘Ever Red’

Camellia 'Brushfield's Yellow'

Camellia ‘Brushfield’s Yellow’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Pam and John (Allan's photo)

Pam and John (Allan’s photo)

Rhododendron fletcherianum

Steve and John identified Rhododendron fletcherianum, the one I had admired on the way in

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We all admired its corky bark.

We all admired its corky bark.

The irrigation pond for the old Clarke Nursery, which used to be on this and the neighbouring property.

The irrigation pond for the old Clarke Nursery, which used to be on this and the neighbouring property.

We all strolled along the big sunny field southwest of the pond, as Pam was proposing ideas for how to best landscape it.  I came up with one idea: a sweep of Stipa gigantea somewhere.

sunny field

Pam, Steve, and John

A metasequoia that was supposed to have one leader.

A metasequoia that was supposed to have one leader, but has decided to do its own thing.

Pam says this Leptospermum from Xera Plants will get large.

Pam says this silver Leptospermum from Xera Plants will get large.  (There’s a boot for scale again!)

Allan's photo: Every plant is admired, and some are caressed.

Allan’s photo: Every plant is admired, and some are caressed.

newish beds to the north of the pond

newish beds to the north of the pond

Pam and John discussing the field, with Genista in the foreground.

Pam and John discussing the field, with Genista in the foreground.

I asked yet again for the name of this tree: Cupresses 'Blue Ice'

I asked yet again for the name of this tree: Cupressus ‘Blue Ice’

Closer; I do wish I had room for trees like this.

Closer; I do wish I had room for trees like this.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another leptospermum

another leptospermum

I love the way Pam gets tactile with the plants.

I love the way Pam gets tactile with the plants.  (Allan’s photo)

I've admired her Seaside, Oregon gardens for so long that I sort of see her like this, an image captured by Allan.

I’ve admired her Seaside, Oregon gardens for so long that I see her like this image captured by Allan.

As we walked back to the house, we admired a reddish Pieris in the distance, through the glade of old rhododendrons.

telephoto brought it closer

telephoto brought it closer

I wish I had thought to take photos of the many tree roots, humped out of the ground and coated with moss.  I noticed them later, on departure, driving away when picture time was over.  You can get a hint of it at the bottom of the above photo.

We went back into the house for some more visiting, and when we left at almost dusk the garden by the house glowed in the early evening light.

dusk

dusk

that enviable euphorbia

There’s that enviable euphorbia again.

The rhododendrons hold their leaves partly closed in winter, for protection.

The rhododendrons hold their leaves partly closed in winter, for protection.

I always feel like I’ve entered a marvelous other world when I visit this garden, so different from mine (which is more full of fiddly little things).

On the way home, I got that anxious after-social feeling that I had talked too much about certain border collies and Long Beach work and decided I was lucky to get asked out at all.  Therefore, I was especially delighted when Pam pulled up behind us and asked to tour our garden, as well.  We had a pleasant walk around before dusk.

Next: Allan and I have different ways to enjoy a day off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 January, 2015

We had been looking forward since early December to a New Year’s Day brunch at the bayside home of Steve and John.  Their social events never give me any advance anxiety, probably because the ones we attend are all about gardening.  I will say that I feel that I have to exercise my brain really hard to keep up, especially when Seaside gardener Pam Fleming is another of the knowledgeable guests.  It’s good for the old brain cells to work hard.

The sun was bright, almost too bright for photos.

bay

bay

fluffy Pinus palustris with the bright stems of Acer palmatum 'Bihou'.

fluffy Pinus palustris with the bright stems of Acer palmatum ‘Bihou’.

As I wrote this, I got all excited at the fluffy, appealing pine  called palustris, which usually means a plant will grow in wet soil. Then I looked it up on Wikipedia and learned that “the scientific name meaning, “of marshes,” is a misunderstanding on the part of Philip Miller, who described the species after seeing longleaf pine forests with temporary winter flooding.”  So I won’t try it in the boggy back garden.

I should have asked for an exactly ID on this.  Will add later!

I should have asked for an exactly ID on this. Will add later!

above: Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm, windmill palm or Chinese windmill palm)

dramatic winter shapes

dramatic winter shapes

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

one ridiculously early rhodo flower

one ridiculously early rhodo flower

one

I simply had to Waterlogue it.

I simply had to Waterlogue it.

They say you can really see the structure of one’s garden in black and white, so let’s have a look at it altered with the BeFunky app (which has some enjoyable effects even though I think the name of the app is silly).

looking good indeed for winter structure

looking good indeed for winter structure

west side of the house

west side of the house

To the north, I saw a bald eagle sitting with his back to me.

eagle

I turned from my Lumix pocketcam to “Spot”, the lens-scratched Canon camera with a more powerful telephoto.

IMG_4326

Coral bark maple near the front door

Coral bark maple near the front door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a pink camellia, taller than the house and in full very early bloom

a pink camellia, taller than the house and in full very early bloom

 

In we went.  I had hoped to bring a few hellebore seedlings, but at midmorning they were still solidly in the ground, so I could only bring a small bouquet of intensely fragrant Lonicera standishii, whose tiny white blossoms do normally bloom now.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in

Lonicera and some corkscrew rush in glass jar

Steve putting the finishing touches on brunch

Steve putting the finishing touches on brunch

I sat at the end of the counter and noticed, as I always do there, how perfectly the front door frames the coral bark maple.

view

 

When Pam arrived, the devices all came out and assorted plants were looked up.

 

Lonicera standishii was one of the plants explored online.

Lonicera standishii was one of the plants explored online.  (left to right, Allan, John, Steve, Pam)

 

Behind orange mimosas, Steve looks up a plant on his phone.

Behind orange mimosas, Steve looks up a plant on his phone.

back to chefing

back to chefing

his signature appetizer with carmelized onions and gorgonzola chees

his signature appetizer with carmelized onions and gorgonzola cheese

A gardening book was produced...

A gardening book was produced…

recently inscribed by Ann Lovejoy, whom we all adore.

recently inscribed by Ann Lovejoy, whom we all adore; this had been a gift from a Bainbridge Island friend.

I took a look out the north window to see how the pump house’s green roof is doing.  The weather has been hard on the California succulents.  Pleasingly, some survive.

greenish roof from north window

greenish roof from north window

a detail from the room

a detail from the room

a new sculpture which may go outside in fine weather.

a new sculpture which may go outside in fine weather.

Here are two crow paintings, probably both by local artist Pat Fagerland.

crows

This one is most definitely a Fagerland.

looking down to the fireplace seating

looking down to the fireplace seating

which I felt would look good in Waterlogue!

which I felt would look good in Waterlogue.

The table was set on the lower level and we settled in to the repast and more plant talk.

table

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Rather cosmically, just last night I had been reading about black eyed peas and New Year’s Day.

from The Warmth of Other Suns...

from The Warmth of Other Suns…

black eyed peas for New Year's Day

black eyed peas for New Year’s Day

The thought had crossed my mind that I should eat some black eyed peas today for luck, yet I had none and no idea where to get any.  And here, in our delicious brunch, the traditional black eyed peas played a part!

with quiche and spicy sausage...

with quiche and spicy sausage…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, with Pam’s addition of black eyed peas salad front and center; it is her good luck tradition, too!  I also think there were black eyed peas next to the quiche, so we’ll double our good luck.

and a bowl of fruit, including crisp Asian pears.

and a bowl of fruit, including crisp Asian pears.

the view toward Willapa Bay

the view toward Willapa Bay

The tide was going out.  During the recent high tides, the water came all the way up to that tree.

I looked at the lichen dangling from the tall tree and thought that the “snow” on the indoor Christmas tree sort of echoed that ornamentation.

tree

The tide was going out.

Willapa Bay

In summer, Steve and John can see flickering campfires over on Long Island.

We repaired to the study to look at a Powerpoint presentation created to showcase the upcoming inaugural Peninsula Rhododendron Tour.  While we gathered, Allan took some photos from the window:

birdfeeder, Allan's photo

bird feeder, Allan’s photo

window view

window view, Allan’s photo

window view

window view, Allan’s photo

The presentation, created with wit and style, would attract any rhododendron fan to the peninsula.  Steve and John had recently presented it to the American Rhododendron Society’s Portland chapter and may show it to a chapter up in Seattle.  You will want to mark your calendars for May 2.

may

This tour will be in addition to the July 18, 2015 Music in the Gardens tour.

The presentation explored the timeline of the American Rhododendron Society itself…

book

rhodos

The local connection was explored via the history of J. Harold Clarke, who was the grandfather of Steve Clarke, known to us in our day as the plantsman extraordinaire of Clarke Nursery.  Steve and John’s property and that of their neighbour, Ron Barclay, were part of the original Clarke Nursery.

jhc

Note the mention of a rhodo names after our Steve Clarke.

 

The story was set off beautifully by the eastern view from the study windows.

The story was set off beautifully by the eastern view from the study windows.

Both properties are rich in species and hybrid rhododendrons and will be the centerpiece of the tour, along with a breakfast lecture by Steve Clarke.

A series of photos told the story of the transformation of Steve and John’s property from a woodland full of ivy and salal to a collectors’ garden, revealing treasures of old rhododendrons and other plants along the way.

I recall visiting last spring and being bowled over, almost literally, by the fragrance of a particular rhododendron.  I now know this it is not ‘King George'; it is ‘Venus’.

learned

not 'King George': 'Venus'

not ‘King George': ‘Venus’, taken last April 22.

may

After the well done and informative show, we found that daylight was almost gone.

view

the tide is further out

The inside wall of the upper level mimics the shape of the windows in a most satisfying way.

The inside wall of the upper level mimics the shape of the windows in a most satisfying way.

the glow of the house as we depart

the glow of the house as we depart

and an almost full moon over the roof

and an almost full moon over the roof

When we arrived back in Ilwaco after dark, we saw the peace sign alight over the home of Don Andersen and finally managed to get a photo of it for this year.  It’s one of our favourite seasonal displays, along with the Christmas star over Jessie’s Fish Company, which we noted has been turned off for the year.  Allan walked up Elizabeth Avenue to get the pictures.

Elizabeth Avenue, looking north from Lake Street

Elizabeth Avenue, looking north from Lake Street

the Andersen peace sign

the Andersen peace sign

The peace sign, black eyed peas, and brunch with three of our favourite gardeners are surely all good portents for 2015.

2015/01/img_7617.jpg

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Tuesday, 2 September 2014 (part one)

Steve and John’s most amazing bayside garden deserves its own separate post, so I’m dividing today into two parts.

After dining with them last Thursday night at the Cove, we were invited for a garden tour and lunch at Steve and John’s bayside home, where all is soothing and uncluttered.

We took some tomatoes and a bouquet of flowers and foliage from our garden; the bouquet went into the most perfect vase of wood (with a water holding insert).

in their kitchen

in their kitchen

Plant lovers that our hosts are, we spent quite some time discussing the various plants (including one I had to look up later, Clematis heracleifolia ‘New Love’ to the right, and Rubus lineatus, a few types of boxleaf honeysuckle, Hypericum (maybe ‘Albury Purple’), sanguisorbas, etc etc. Just the sort of conversation I love to have, although of course my mind went blank on some plant names till later.

the bay view (east) from the house

the bay view (east) from the house

and the north view with the newly planted green roof (which we will examine closely later).

and the north view to the flower and kitchen garden with the newly planted green roof (which we will examine closely later).

The window reflection above shows the bay and a good architectural feature: the opening into the lower level of the house has cross pieces like a window frame; Steve and/or John’s idea to enhance local architect Eric Fagerland’s design.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

north

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I wish I had taken a photo of the luncheon table, a few steps down from the kitchen. Sometimes it seems intrusive to take photos showing the inside of friends’ houses, so I tend to avoid it even at moments when it would be appropriate.

Allan did take this photo in the kitchen.

Allan did take this photo in the kitchen.

I hope I am counting and not pointing. (On an earlier visit, I did point at the drawer and cupboard handles, whose shape is the shape of a wave, so perfect for a home by the water.) The book is Eden on Their Minds, which I took to show them.

I did (of course) photograph Chef Steve’s delicious food.

the salad, picked from the kitchen garden

the salad, with greens picked from the kitchen garden

mushrooms in sauce on polenta

mushrooms in sauce on polenta cakes

so delicious

so delicious

After lingering over coffee, we went out to tour the garden. To Allan’s and my surprise, a very light mist had begun to descend. Before we went to see the new green roof on the pumphouse, John showed us the diagram he had made on his computer.

I wish I could remember how many inches each layer represents.

I wish I could remember how many inches each layer represents. It is a very exact diagram.

The view from John's computer desk would prevent me from getting much done.

The view from John’s computer desk would prevent me from getting much done; I would just gaze.

Then outside and to the north of the house...

Then outside and to the north of the house…

...to the patch of dahlias by the kitchen garden.

…to the patch of dahlias by the kitchen garden.

dahlia

dahlia

the renowned dahlia 'Bishop of Llandalf'

the renowned dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandalf’

dahlia with a glimpse of Willapa Bay

dahlia with a glimpse of Willapa Bay

an extra that the catalog added to the order

an extra that the catalog added to the order

a dahlia guest

a dahlia guest

The dahlias came from Old House Dahlias (Mark Harvey) in Portland (purchased at the Portland Home and Garden Show).

We turned to a close examination of the newly planted green roof of the pumphouse with its collection of succulents generously sent by Garden Tour Nancy’s friend Mary from Pasadena. Mary had been here for Music in the Gardens and clearly appreciated Steve and John’s garden.

roof

green roof

roof2

John gives a sense of scale.

John gives a sense of scale.

succulent forest at eye level

succulent forest at eye level

Pink salvia by the pumphouse

Pink salvia by the pumphouse with Cuban oregano

Now began our walk through all the borders.

a hydrangea flower on one long sideways stem

a hydrangea flower on one long sideways stem

Hydrangea fading into subtle autumn hues.

Hydrangea fading into subtle autumn hues.

It had been bright blue like this...

It had been bright blue like this…

The subtler colours have their own beauty.

The subtler colours have their own beauty.

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'lemon twist' (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Lemon Twist’ (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Salvia guaranitica 'Winnifred Gilman'

Salvia guarantica

This plant was from Seaside gardener Pam Fleming.

This plant was from Seaside gardener Pam Fleming.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Little Goldstar' backed with Salvia guaranitica

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii ‘Little Goldstar’ backed with Salvia guaranitica

red fountain grass backed with Salvia 'Black and Blue'

red fountain grass backed with Salvia ‘Black and Blue’ (backed with Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)

red fountain grass, a dahlia, and a dwarf conifer that looks like a fern

red fountain grass, a dahlia, and a dwarf conifer that looks like a fern

Senecio greyii with leaves edged in silver

Senecio greyii with leaves edged in silver

dahlia

dahlia

Asclepias by the pond

Asclepias by the pond

Caryopteris 'Blue Balloon'

Caryopteris ‘Blue Balloon’

Genista:  I like the airy appearance without the flowers.

Genista: I like the airy appearance without the flowers.

a bright pink hebe

a bright pink hebe

pond garden

pond garden; the pink phlox is ‘Sherbet’

Coronilla valentina variegata

Coronilla valentina variegata (with the pale foliage, had bright yellow flowers, common name scorpion vetch!)

the pond garden from the other side (with rain making splashes in the water)

the pond garden from the other side (with rain making splashes in the water)

The spruce (left) will get outsized and will be removed soon.

The spruce (left) will get outsized and will be removed soon.

pond3

On the other side of the entry drive, we took a close look at Hydrangea ‘Plum Passion’.

Hydrangea 'Plum Passion'

Hydrangea ‘Plum Passion’

delicately fluffy lacecap flowers

delicately fluffy lacecap flowers

Pittosporum

Pittosporum, love the black stems

The bench may get an arbour soon.

The bench may get an arbour soon.

As the rain became a bit harder, we strolled on up the driveway.

As the rain became a bit harder, we strolled on up the driveway.

On the left of the driveway is a new bed, created with painstaking effort to get the native meianthemum (false lily of the valley) out, at least for awhile. The exposed root reminds me of the stone crevice garden at the John Kuzma garden in Portland.

new bed

new bed with new species rhododendrons

looking east toward the house

looking east toward the house

young species rhodo with old snag

young species rhodo with old snag

We all wondered at this red rhododendron blooming now.

We all wondered at this red rhododendron blooming now.

seems odd!

seems odd!

an impressively large fungus at the base of some salal

an impressively large fungus at the base of some salal

fungus

with Steve's hand for comparison

with Steve’s hand for comparison

an offshoot of the fungus

an offshoot of the fungus

on up the drive to the house

on up the drive to the house

Hebe 'Quicksilver' to the north of the driveway

Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ to the north of the driveway

Steve and John’s ladies in waiting section is admirably small. They had just been to Whitney Gardens and Nursery and returned with a few treasures (limited by plant hauling in a Prius).

Pinus densiflora 'Golden Ghost', stunning

Pinus densiflora ‘Golden Ghost’, stunning

Just look at that foliage.

Just gaze upon that foliage.

and look some more

and look some more

Rhododendron 'Cherries and Merlot'

Rhododendron ‘Cherries and Merlot’

along the front of the house

along the front of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house; water from the roofs drips into here with a pleasant sound.

With the rain coming down in earnest now, we prepared to leave, although we were not sure if we were going to be able to work or not.

Rain or not, we had to examine the upper garden more thoroughly.

Rain or not, we had to examine the upper garden more thoroughly.

the form of the almost human tree

the form of the almost human, huggable tree

Steve says “The huggable tree is:

Xanthocyparis Nootkatensis ‘Green Arrow’ (Green Arrow Weeping Cedar)

The foreground shrub in the same shot (to the left) is:

Ulmus x Hollandica ‘Jacqueline Hillier’ (Dwarf Elm ‘Jacqueline Hillier’)”

the clearing of the white hydrangea

the clearing of the white hydrangea

a kiwi among rhodos seeks hosts on which to climb

a kiwi among rhodos seeks hosts on which to climb

a bank of heather dating back to the old garden (pre Steve and John)

a bank of heather dating back to the old garden (pre Steve and John)

I was still taking photos after we got in our van to drive away.

looking north from the parking area

looking north from the parking area

and northeast back to the house

and northeast back to the house

This spectacular garden will be on a Water Music Festival rhododendron garden tour next spring; I will let you know as soon as the date is set.

For our previous visits to the garden, see:

our first visit, Sept. 26 last year

a springtime visit, April 23

a June visit, June 21

the garden on tour day, July 20

I want to live a long life to see young parts of this garden mature over the years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival

McCormick-Stephens Garden

photo 3

I did not take as many photos as I would have liked to do this wonderful garden justice, as I was hobbling around and eventually I just sat on the east side patio and listened to the music and had delicious snacks.  Meanwhile, Allan was helping out with something over at the Barclay garden and only got a few photos himself.  Fortunately, we have visited the garden before….and Garden Tour Nancy collected some extra photos for me from herself and another photographer, and I got some from Kathleen Shaw and Pam Fleming, who were touring in a different order than Allan and I.  Kathleen now has a vacation cottage here and traveled from the Olympia area for the tour.  Pam is the gardener for Seaside, Oregon and runs the fabulous Back Alley Gardens nursery in Gearhart, Oregon, a source for many cool plants in this garden.

I did make it though the whole garden, though, just not with as much close attention as it deserves.  Because of my excuse of mobility issues, I have also filled in a bit with some photos from earlier visits.

True plant nerds can drop to the bottom of this post for the amazing list of plants in the garden.

It was possible to simply stroll across the bayside lawn from Barclay’s to Steve and John’s garden; both gardens were part of the vastness that was once Clarke Nursery:

The lawn below the deck sweeps across the bayfront in a smooth transition to the garden to the south, which was also on the tour.

The lawn below Barclay’s east side deck across the bayfront in a smooth transition to Steve and John’s garden.

Steve and John's garden map

Steve and John’s garden map

As best as I can, I’ll number the photos for those who wish to refer to the excellent map.  Any mix up in numbering is mine alone.

The trees and shrubs collected by these two CPNs (certified plant nuts) come from all over the Northwest; I do know that some of them come from our local collectors’ nursery, Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.  (Owner Pam Fleming provided some photos for this blog entry.)

I first entered through a path from Barclay’s south side garden to Steve and John’s kitchen garden.

a peek from the Barclay garden to Steve and John's garden just next door to the south.

a peek from the Barclay garden to Steve and John’s garden just next door to the south.

the kitchen garden

(4) the kitchen garden

Garden Tour Nancy's kitchen garden photo

Garden Tour Nancy’s kitchen garden photo

photo by Nancy Allen, who loves kitchen garden

photo by Nancy Allen, who loves kitchen gardens

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Pam Fleming

to my right as I walked toward the house

(12) to my right as I walked toward the house

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

flowers

garden area 12

young trees and shrubs intermingle with established shrubs from the old nursery that was here.

(6) young trees and shrubs intermingle with established shrubs from the old nursery that was here.

Chamaecypris pisifera compressa, photo by Pam Fleming

Chamaecyparis pisifera compressa, photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Pam Fleming

lots of gold foliage glowing in the mixed borders

(6) lots of gold foliage and well thought out shapes glowing in the mixed borders northwest of the house

shrubs

garden area  6 (upper rhody grove)

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Pam Fleming

photo by Dwight Caswell

photo by Dwight Caswell

sculpture by the front door

sculpture by the front door

elegance in design to the east of the house

(2) elegance in design to the east of the house; between two wings is a rainwater swale

Allan's photo, between the two wings of the house

Allan’s photo, between the two wings of the house

looking north from just west of the house, photo by Kathleen Shaw

looking north from just west of the house, photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

on the south side of the driveway

(3) on the south side of the driveway

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Dwight Caswell

photo by Dwight Caswell

Around the south side of the house, a path built by landscaper Steve Clarke makes an easy transition for wheelbarrowing mulch.

This area used to be a rougher descent; Steve Clarke solved the problem.

This area used to be a rougher descent; Steve Clarke solved the problem.

Willapa view covered patio, Sept 2013

Willapa view covered patio, Sept 2013

from Sept 2013: the dell below the patio with native Evergreen Huckleberry

a meticulously tended native landscape

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Pam Fleming:  Steve and John with garden guests

photo by Pam Fleming: Steve and John with garden guests

photo by Pam Fleming

John and Steve with…Lisa??  photo by Pam Fleming

My goodness, that certainly looks like our good friend Lisa of the hydrangea house!!

Wilho Saari playing the kantele.

Music in the Gardens: Wilho Saari playing the kantele on the east side patio.

Steve and John had specifically suggested Wilho Saari, a fifth-generation Finnish-American player of the kantele, the Finnish psaltery.  John’s Finnish heritage made it extra special to have Wilho be the featured musician.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan bought Wilho's CD

Allan bought Wilho’s CD

Allan's photo of tour guests who arrived from across the bayside lawn

Allan’s photo of tour guests who arrived from across the bayside lawn; in red is Water Music Festival board member Rita Nicely (whose garden has been on the tour before, I think in 2008).

John and a garden tour guest

John and Ann Goldeen, garden show host from KMUN community radio; the drink (soon replenished) was a delicious blueberry lemonade.

I was suddenly called back over to the Barclay garden for a tour-related question, and when I returned to Steve and John’s garden, I entered by a different way, down by the pond far to the west of the house.

north side of pond (garden area 11)

northwest side of pond (garden area 11-ish)

garden area 11, north side of pond

garden area 11, north side of pond

garden area 11 (which was being planted in Sept of '13, as I recall)

garden area 11 (which was being planted in Sept of ’13, as I recall)

garden area 11

garden area 11

garden area 11

garden area 11

as I walk around the pond (area 13)

Looking up into a mountain ash (Sorbus) as I walk around the pond (area 13)

You can just glimpse the shed, which is in area 8, I believe.

You can just glimpse the shed, which is in area 8, I believe.

hydrangeas, north of the driveway turn, including the dark leaved 'Plum Passion'

hydrangeas, north of the driveway turn, including the dark leaved ‘Plum Passion’ (9 or 10)

8, the holly/fern grove

8, the holly/fern grove

looking to the Cryptomeria grove (10?)

looking west to the Cryptomeria grove (10?)

Styrax japonicus 'Momo Shidare' (Weeping Pink Japanese Snowbell), photo by Dwight Caswell

Styrax japonicus ‘Momo Shidare’ (Weeping Pink Japanese Snowbell), photo by Dwight Caswell

the holly/fern grove

the holly/fern grove

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

Acer palmatum 'Peaches and Cream' (Peaches and Cream Japanese Maple)

Acer palmatum ‘Peaches and Cream’ (Peaches and Cream Japanese Maple), photo by Pam Fleming

looking east to the house through the lower rhody grove (to the left)

looking east to the house through the lower rhody grove (to the left)

The large rhododendrons date back to Clarke Nursery.

looking east through the rhody groves

looking east through the rhody groves

We were fortunate to have visited this garden in springtime when many of the rhododenrons were in bloom.

lower rhody grove

lower rhody grove with huckleberries, as well

approaching the house via the long driveway

approaching the house via the long driveway

Who should I see but my friend Carol Clearman, with her daughter and grand daughter!

Who should I see but my friend Carol Clearman, with her daughter and grand daughter!

garden area 2 (west of house) again

garden area 2 (west of house) again

the path to the north around the kitchen garden (area 4)

the path to the north around the kitchen garden (area 4)

Allan's photo, looking northwest over the kitchen garden

Allan’s photo, looking northwest over the kitchen garden

in the corner of the kitchen garden, photo by Dwight Caswell

Ulmus x hollanida ‘Wredei’ (golden elm) in the corner of the kitchen garden, photo by Dwight Caswell

and back to the east side patio where a friend of Steve and John's was replenishing the berry lemonade.

and back to the east side patio where a friend of Steve and John’s was replenishing the blueberry lemonade.

Blueberry Lemonade

Blend:

1 cup lemon juice (bottled is fine)

6 oz. blueberries (fresh or frozen)

1/2 cup sugar

Add 3 cups water and ice

Voila!

delicious refreshments

delicious refreshments

and more, which were continually replenished by our gracious hosts.

and more (carmelized onions on crostini were simply delicious), which were continually replenished by our gracious hosts.

The garden tour menu was:

Skewered pepper jack cheese, cherry tomato and fresh basil.

Crostini with caramelized onion and crumbled Gorgonzola.

Hard salami, cream cheese, and arugula wraps.  Warm beef meatballs.  Salmon spread with crackers.  Grapes.  Hot coffee with ginger snaps.

photo by Nancy Allen of John and a tour guest

photo by Nancy Allen of John and Wilho Saari’s wife, Kaisa

Nancy Allen's photo

Nancy Allen’s photo

A member of the Mozart Chicks had finished playing at the Goelz garden, just down the road, and was listening to Wilho Saari with rapt attention.

A member of the Mozart Chicks had finished playing at the Goelz garden, just down the road, and was listening to Wilho Saari with rapt attention.

More plant photos by Pam Fleming and Nancy Allen:

Asclepias Curassavica 'Apollo  Orange' (Scarlet Milkweed)

Asclepias Curassavica ‘Apollo Orange’ (Scarlet Milkweed)

Penisetum setaceum var rubrum (Red Feather Grass)

Penisetum setaceum var rubrum (Red Feather Grass)

Chamaecypris obtusa 'Lemon Twist' (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Chamaecypris obtusa ‘Lemon Twist’ (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Chamaecypris pisifera compressa (Blue Moss Cypress), photo by Pam Fleming

Chamaecypris pisifera compressa (Blue Moss Cypress), photo by Pam Fleming

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snowflake', photo by Dwight Caswell

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’, photo by Nancy Allen

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snowflake', photo by Dwight Caswell

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’, photo by Nancy Allen

At a little before three, I realized that we simply must move on as there were two more gardens to see and I knew that the next one would take awhile to tour as it would be all new to Allan, so we took our leave.

I hope to get back to this garden later this year for some fall colour (a hint to Steve and John!) and get some better plant photos of their wide selection of collectors’ trees and shrubs.

The Plant List

…is  a work in progress, which has not been edited for publication, so there are still likely changes/corrections/additions to be made.  Any wobble in the formatting is mine from making  screenshots of the document.

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Wow.  This has certainly inspired me to think about going out and cataloging my own garden so that I stop losing track of plant names!

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Monday, 21 April 2014

We returned to Stephen and John’s glorious garden, which I had last seen with Garden Tour Nancy in September, this time to see the rhododendrons in bloom.  Allan and I were first to arrive at 4:30, soon joined by Garden Tour Nancy and Phil and a bit later by Pam and Kathy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.  Stephen and John are regular shoppers at that excellent little nursery.

As we waited for Pam and Kathy to arrive (who had the longest drive by far and were delivering a Japanese maple), we admired the assorted views from the living room.  I am always a little hesitant to take lots of photos inside a home which is not officially on a home tour, but here are some hints (with permission):

the view, east over Willapa Bay

the view, east over Willapa Bay

two of a large collection of garden books

one of a large collection of garden books

Oh, and look, a book by local writer and daily blogger Sydney Stevens.

more gardening books

more gardening books

window view looking north

window view looking north

and east again

and east again

The garden will be one of seven or eight on the Peninsula Garden Tour, Music in the Gardens, on July 19th.  The musician will probably be sitting on the patio shown above.

This is their favourite bird sculpture...

This is their favourite bird sculpture…

and these were mine.

and this was my favourite.

birds2

And then…Pam and Kathy arrived and we soon walked out in the soft light to tour the garden.  I took copious notes, first on my phone (with many comical results by autospell like a “blow dry” rather than loderi rhododendron) and then scribbled on notecards.  I do hope I will be able to decipher them and get the right plant names on the many photos.

some of my notes!

some of my notes!  I gave up on autospell after ridiculous results

We began west of the parking area by the house.

We began west of the parking area by the house.

Intense fragrance in the air came from a huge rhododendron to the north, the same one we had seen from the north window.  I had no idea that rhododendrons ever had that intoxicating a scent.  Stephen and John’s garden and the property just to the north of it were originally part of Clarke Nursery, and the rhododendron collection goes back many years.  It is a beautiful thing that two knowledgeable rhodo fanciers bought this property.

Rhododendron loderi 'King George'

Rhododendron loderi ‘Venus’

king george

The swoonworthy sweet fragrance made it hard to move on!

me, John, and Pam

me, John, and Pam

a very prostrate yew from The Planter Box

a very prostrate yew from The Planter Box

a Heuchera in bloom, probably 'Snow Angel'?

a Heuchera in bloom, probably ‘Snow Angel’?

bright new leaves on Pieris

bright new leaves on Pieris

frog

looking back toward the house and a striking Japanese maple

looking back toward the house and a striking Acer

and back to King George!

and back to Venus!

We then all went round the north side of the house to the bay.  Next door is the former Clarke Nursery home, and its garden will also be on the garden tour.

looking forth from Stephen and John's lawn

looking forth from Stephen and John’s lawn

As we strolled, flocks of birds swooped just above the water of the bay.

flock

flock2

Kathy, John, Pam, Phil, Nancy, Allan, John

Kathy, John, Pam, Phil, Nancy, Allan, John

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron 'Shamrock'...blooms on St Patrick's Day (my birthday!)

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron ‘Shamrock’…blooms on St Patrick’s Day (my birthday!)

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron 'Shamrock'...which had bloomed on St Patrick's Day (my birthday!)

Rhododenron ‘Shamrock’

our native evergreen huckleberry

our native evergreen huckleberry

the east patio

the east patio

John and Stephen have accentuated this lovely native dell.

John and Stephen have accentuated this lovely native dell.

moss and evergreen huckleberry

moss and evergreen huckleberry

Last time we visited, they wondered how to make a good walkway around the south corner of the house.  Over the winter, local landscaper Steve Clarke, whose family once owned this property, built this perfect solution.   I wish I had that sort of hardscaping skill.

the elegant new walkway, easy for wheelbarrows.

the elegant new walkway, easy for wheelbarrows….and discussion of what to plant in that corner.  Pam suggested a variegated Eucryphia.

walkway

The Eucryphia in question, I think from Back Alley.  Autospell could not handle that plant name.

The Eucryphia in question, I think from Back Alley. Autospell could not handle that plant name.

Rhododendron 'Capistrano'

Rhododendron ‘Capistrano’

mossy dell from the newwalkway

mossy dell from the new walkway

west side of the house, south of the parking area

west side of the house, south of the parking area, with a golden Lonicera

looking west down the driveway

looking west down the driveway

the west courtyard between the two wings of the house

the west courtyard between the two wings of the house

trees

courtyard

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, variegated Japanese maple leaves

Allan’s photo, variegated Japanese maple leaves

Euphorbia flowers

Euphorbia flowers

Pam did not have her camera and particularly asked for photos of certain plants which caught her eye.  This little conifer, whose name I did not write down, was one.

Pam

setting

bed

One of the old rhododendrons

One of the old rhododendrons

hosta and mahonia

hosta backed with mahonia

a massive redwood trunk

a massive redwood trunk

magestic

magestic

sword fern and redwood

sword fern and redwood

house

gold

Vaccinium nummularium (a wee evergreen huckleberry)

Vaccinium nummularium (a wee evergreen huckleberry)

down a gentle slope...red huckleberries

down a gentle slope…red huckleberries

whirly

Next to three railroad tie steps going down, a Polemonium had popped up on all its own.  I am sure it is ‘Stairway to Heaven’, which is perfect as from below those simple risers lead toward the house.

Polemonium (Jacob's Ladder) 'Stairway to Heaven'

Polemonium (Jacob’s Ladder) ‘Stairway to Heaven’

a glade, with a kiwi vine

a glade, with a kiwi vine

Pam had to pet it.

Pam had to pet it.

You can see why.

You can see why.

Pam commented that a kiwi with nothing to climb on will tend to stay smaller and not clamber all over.

Maianthemum (false lily of the valley)

Maianthemum (false lily of the valley)

When asked what we do about the rampant native groundcover, I had no solution but to live with it.  It does go dormant later in the year after going through a rather annoying yellowing off stage.

another choice rhodo

another choice rhodo…’Silver Skies’ perhaps?

Allan pointed out how meticulously the old fronds of the sword ferns were clipped.

Allan pointed out how meticulously the old fronds of the sword ferns were clipped.  No old stubs at all.

another rhodo...and I am floundering in my notes!

another rhodo…and I am floundering in my notes!  Sir Charles Lemon, perhaps? S&J know all the names!

Fatsia x hedera, Allan's photo

Fatsia x hedera, Allan’s photo

When the driveway was put in after Stephen and John bought the house, the builders wanted to remove the Thuja.  No indeed, the driveway curves around it.

drive

a thuja saved

To our south, while clearing the woods of salal (I applaud that!!) and alders, Stephen and John revealed a tall grove of species rhododendrons so old that even Steve Clarke could not identify them.

rhodogrove

cloud forest

cloud forest

We amble down the drive.

We amble down the drive.

Stephen and John cleared all these woods with pick and saw.

Stephen and John cleared all these woods with pick and saw.

Mango Tango

Pam pointed out that the flower of Rhododendron ‘Mango Tango’ matches the new growth on the huckleberry.

Next, in one of the open bays in the woods along the side of the drive, a bright hydrangea caught my eye.

hydrangea

gold leaves

behind it, a blue corydalis

behind it, a blue corydalis

hydrangea from a Dan Hinkley collection

a hydrangea from a Dan Hinkley collection

bronze

large serrated hydrangea leaves

large serrated hydrangea leaves

When they joined the Rhododendron Society of Portland, Stephen and John were given a rhododendron as a gift, and they chose this one:

Rhododendon 'Starbright Champagne'

Rhododendon ‘Starbright Champagne’

Rhododendron erosum

Rhododendron erosum

R. erosum

R. erosum

I recognized Disporum 'Night Heron'..doing better than mine.

I recognized Disporum ‘Night Heron’..doing better than mine.

I walked way back to look at this bright epimidium.

I walked way back to look at this bright epimidium.

Next to it, an epimidium in flower

Next to it, an epimidium in flower..looking best when you turn up the blooms to look underneath

and found a dark stream that marks the southern edge of the property...

I found a dark stream that marks the southern edge of the property…

flowing to the bay from the center of the Peninsula.

flowing to the bay from the center of the Peninsula.

Pam was interested to see the Lindera (spicebush) which had just leafed out.

Lindera benzoin?

Lindera benzoin?

As we came to the Thuja by the driveway, I thought that its bright skirt of foliage was a shrub planted underneath.

thuja

We all examined and remarked how the lower branches had layered and rooted into the ground.

We all examined and remarked how the lower branches had layered and rooted into the ground.

To our south, another bay in the woods held a Cryptomeria grove.  I kept asking what conifer each little tree was and only a bit later did I realize how little I had grasped that it was indeed a Cryptomeria grove and that they were all Cryptomerias!

Cryptomeria spiraliter falcata

Cryptomeria spiraliter falcata

another cryptomeria

another cryptomeria

but wait...is this one?  I am floundering in my notes.

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Auricariodes’

From the Xera catalog: Cryptomeria japonica ‘Auricariodes’ Zn6a (-10º to -5ºF) Cupressaceae

“Fantastic, exotic looking conifer with rope-like branches that are sparse  and twisty when young but become denser with age. To 10′ tall and forming a conical shape over time. Grows slowly in youth, picks up steam after several years. Full sun to light shade in WELL DRAINED soil, with regular summer water. Excellent specimen tree, well behaved. Always looks cool. Coldy hardy. Old selection of Japanese Cedar. Monkey Puzzle in miniature. “

I’m pretty good at going through a garden and identifying shrubs and perennials but am sadly lacking in knowledge of conifers.  A garden like this makes me want to change that.

another one...perhaps elegans

Cryptomeria elegans…or is it…’Dense Jade’?

a variegated sambucus

a variegated sambucus

I've never met a sambucus I did not love.

I’ve never met a sambucus I did not love.

On the other side of the driveway lies the big, still pond, which used to provide irrigation for Clarke Nursery.

looking north

looking north

We had to look from every angle.

We enjoyed every angle.

pond3

pond4

pond5

the view toward the neighbour's house

the view toward the neighbour’s house

pond7

reflection

bench

Those who like still water won't find that there are too many pond photos.

Those who like still water won’t find that there are too many pond photos.

Stephen and John are making a new garden bed on the north side of the pond.

new

I think that is where I saw this little rhodo.

I think that is where I saw this little rhodo.

and definitely this tree.

and definitely this tree.

photos

Pam and I were quite taken with it.

two

touring

We walked through large trees on the way back to the house.

We walked among larger trees on the way back to the house.

Eastern white pine

Eastern white pine

graceful trunks

graceful trunks; I think this was the very old, very large cotoneaster

And then…into the house where we were given martinis…

shaken by Stephen

shaken by Stephen (and note how the kitchen cabineta have wavelike handles)

and some amazingly delicious hors d’oeuvres.

martinia

After a martini, I was incapable to remember to photograph the caramelized onion and cheese on toast most delicious snacks I’ve had…or the friends having conversations about plants and books and architecture.  I do remember that earlier in the garden tour, Nancy said that a certain book, one that was fun and easy to read, was like “butter” and I loved that.

Thanks, Stephen and John, for including us in the soirée, and I hope you’ll let me know if I have any plant names wrong.  I believe your garden is going to be the best on the tour this year.

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