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Posts Tagged ‘shade garden’

Sunday, 5 August 2018

Steve and John of the Bayside Garden had invited a group of working gardeners for lunch and an afternoon in the garden.

John and a bouquet that we brought (Allan’s photo)

some flowers from my garden

and sweet peas from Todd’s garden

We had Todd Wiegardt of Willapa Gardening, Pam Fleming of Nature’s Helper in Seaside, Dave Van Domelon representing Sea Star Gardening, and Ed Strange, who has just this past week retired and passed on his business, Strange Landscaping, into new hands. (I wonder if the new owner will change the name?)

We started with mimosas. Pam, Todd, Dave (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Todd had brought carrots, beets, zucchini and lettuce from his amazing family veg garden (Allan’s photo)

As always at Steve and John’s, the food was delectable.

Allan’s photo

Dave, Pam, Steve, me

Ed, Todd, and John (Allan’s photo)

After a good long lunch and chat, Ed departed because he had much to do.  He has started a new business doing estate sales, at which he will excel.  The rest of us went on a tour throughout the garden, starting with the Willapa Bay (east) side.

the view from inside looking east

and the view to the north

There are about 80 clipped evergreen huckleberries in this bayside dell.

Hydrangeas ‘Bombshell’ and ‘Endless Summer’ at the north edge of the bayside garden; low tide on the bay.

We walked around the house to the driveway garden on the south side.

Here is Corokia x virgata ‘Sunsplash’…

which I know because John had his database notebook with him.

…which is something I keep meaning to do for my garden.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

west side of the house

looking west down the south side of the driveway

As we continued our walk, I resolved this time to try to photograph the views of the garden as a whole rather than focusing so much on individual plants.  (It also takes less brain power, which is waning in August.)  The bright sunlight was not entirely conducive

looking across to the north side of the driveway

north side

north side

north side: Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’

Ulmus ‘Jacqueline Hillier’ demands a close look.

looking west down the driveway

We proceeded through the newest planting areas under the limbed up trees on the south side of the driveway.

the joy of plants (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

further along the south side, in a newly planted area (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

A merged trunk to puzzle over (Allan’s photo)

A ruffly ligularia (farfugium) reminds me that I used to have this plant…(pretty sure)

a rhododendron with a mind of its own

my special silver leaved pet

Rhododendron degronianum ssp yakushimanum x R. pachysanthum

Rhododendron ‘Cherries and Merlot’, another one I especially like.

Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’

right: Rhododendron sinogrande

Allan’s photo

all beautifully mulched

a young Itea illicifolia (Allan’s photo)

cryptomeria grove

Dave, Todd, John

Pam wanted to get into the sun (I liked the cool shade) and she and Steve went to the other side of the irrigation pond to the sunny borders.

a look back at the blissful shady cryptomeria grove

looking east toward the house

a frog in the irrigation pond (Allan’s photo)

Allan saw “hundreds and thousands” of tadpoles in the pond.

the north side of the pond

Monarda and Todd (Allan’s photo)

rudbeckia by the pond (Allan’s photo)

a young Camperdown elm

Pam, John, Steve, Todd, and a Berberis ‘Orange Rocket’ that was supposed to be columnar

Allan’s photo

a sit spot as we walk east toward the house

a sunny border

(The wooden boxes above are on the next door property.)

another sit spot

enviable hostas as we near the house

a gorgeous old hydrangea

a prostrate golden yew wending its way among rhododendrons

kitchen garden by the pump house

We had completed our tour, and the party dispersed because Pam needed to be in Astoria soon.

more garden talk before departing (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo: Steve, John, Pam, Todd, Dave, me

I wouldn’t have minded staying for cocktail hour! But we did want to show Pam our own garden, since she only makes it up here a couple of times a year.

postscript at our garden

On the way south, Pam stopped for a 20 minute tour at our place.

Allan’s photo

That was a good day out and inspired me to make some further plans for the shady bogsy wood at home.

 

 

 

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Saturday, 21 July 2018

2018 Spade and Wade Garden Tour

Sponsored by the Tillamook County Master Gardener Association

After garden four, we realized that we had about a half hour drive to the next two gardens, so we had better put lunch at Hidden Acres Greenhouse next on our agenda.

from the tour program

I had been to Hidden Acres before, on a visit to the Sylvia Beach Hotel and looked forward to revisiting.  It was only two minutes from the previous garden.

Hidden Acres Greenhouse and Café, Tillamook

arriving

Now that is a cordyline I could love.

Oh! (Not complaining when I think it must take several hours to make.)

Allan’s photo

in the restroom

Allan’s photo

noisy nest in the breezeway (Allan’s photo)

out back

hanging basket greenhouse

good signage (Allan’s photo)

perennial house (Allan’s photo)

Small herbs were just $3.95.

Allan’s photo

In the café, where we had our lunch:

The ingredient in hummingbird cake is bananas, just so you know.

I remember loving this café and shop, and I still do.

I want this chandelier, but without the bed springs, which would get too dusty.

Allan’s photo

Allan found a cute pop up book with which I amused myself till lunch arrived, which was soon.

Allan went to get me my specs so I could find a certain rabbit, but then our tasty lunch came and we forgot.

tuna melt and French onion soup and Mediterranean pasta salad

my plant haul

We then were off on a drive to Cape Meares.

The drive looks lovely.  I found it nerve-wracking because of my recurring nightmare of going off a road into water.

It is curvier than it looks, and I was so glad to get onto the cape.  (Going back, on the inside, was not too bad.)  Allan noted that the water was too shallow for kayaking.

Garden Five: A Walk in the Woods, Cape Meares

Allan’s photo

unusually handsome phormiums in front

front porch

around to the side

Crinodendron seed pods

Higher, one crinodendron flower remains. (Allan’s photo)

I used to have a crinodendron at my old garden, from Clarke Nursery, wish I still had it.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Coprosma, maybe hardy here?? (Not where I live)

Pacific wax myrtle

at the back of the house

And now into the woods we go. I passed the garden owner sitting with tour guests at a table talking about wild critters, including elk who come into the back garden.

chatting around the table (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

a most clever idea for a garden tour with rough ground

The tree below had been cut decades before and other trees had grown around the stump.

Allan’s photo

I turned back from a steep path and Allan later went down it.

nurse log (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo, docent with tour goers

Back in the garden, there really were artichokes with the aprons.

and paintings by Jenny Stanley

Allan’s photo

the ocean side of the house

the family dog comes home from the beach (Allan’s photo)

I regret I was not in that part of the garden at that moment to meet that dog!

Barbara had put many of her favourite gardening books out.

on the back porch

On the front porch:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Just a few blocks down the street is the ocean.

We now drove a block over and a couple of gravel blocks uphill to a garden that I could hardly bear to leave at closing time.  It is glorious, and will be tomorrow morning’s post.

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Wednesday, 4 July 2018

We continued our garden tour day with a relaxing late afternoon and evening at

The Bayside Garden.

Here is their map of their garden.  You can see this park-like collectors’ garden on July 21 when it is on the local garden tour; tickets available here.

rhododendron trio by the front door

The new boxes right along the property line are in the next door garden, which will also be on the tour.

John

the irrigation pond

After the earlier part of the day had been hot and muggy, we now had a cooling and quite pleasant rain.

There are many plants from Xera Plants in this garden, and Xera owner Paul Bonine got to see how they are faring at the coast.

John and Paul

Evan, Paul, and Ann

deer protection

Evan botanizing

Steve says “Bartlettina sordida (Dirty Thoroughwort or Blue Mist Flower) — Mexico native;  Rare in cultivation!”

This shiny little fellow is R. ‘Rwain’ (rhododendron without an important name)

Paul, Steve, Ann

R. sinogrande

Allan’s photo

R. rex ssp. fictolacteum

dogwood by the pond, close up

R. ‘Grandma’s Hat’

That’s Hydrangea ‘Lemon Daddy’

R. makinoi

my favourite: R. degronianum ssp yakushimanum x R. pachysanthum

newly planted area

Rhododendron ‘Cupcake’

other side of tidal stream

Acer platanoides ‘Rezak’

ladies in waiting

on the pump house roof

We repaired to the east side patio and sat.

our view

a gift from a friend

Ann and Paul

delicious morsels. The flower pot arrangement was also a gift from a friend.

martinis

Ann, Evan, and Paul were going to see the fireworks in Long Beach at dusk, and we had been touring for so long that they did not have time to go back to Ann’s family vacation house in Naselle (half an hour away).  Steve and John kindly rustled up a delicious pasta dinner to keep us all fortified.

photo by Ann Amato (Evan, John, Steve, Paul, me)

The end of a perfect day:

Steve’s photo: me, Allan, Evan (Plant Lust), Paul (Xera Plants), John (Bayside Garden), Ann (Spiffy Seeds/Cistus Nursery)

 

 

 

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Friday, 22 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Hampton Garden, Redmond

going in

We were pleased to see more flowers bordering the large expanse of front lawn.

Allan’s photo

I recognized painted sage in the planter in front of the porch and went to have a closer look.  Like mine lately, it was not colouring up in a showy manner.

Salvia viridis (painted sage); I wonder if it will show more colour soon?

painted sage, not what it used to be; the bracts don’t seem to colour up as in days of yore.

rose garden by the front porch

lawn border

more metal alliums—I want some! Sign says Allium metallica.

Allan’s photo

Allium schubertii seedhead with water bottle for scale

Allan’s photo

burbler

looking across the lawn

flower beds at the end of the lawn

Allan’s photo

a gorgeous iris

I like flowers.  I prefer a garden with perennials and annuals mixed with shrubs, even though it is more maintenance.

This made me happy!

This made me envious.  (I can’t seem to grow delphiniums.) Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Behind the flower beds, a fenced kitchen garden:

further along the side garden, pots of dahlias

another angle on the handsome delphiniums

We thought this might be a clever upcycled…something…to keep the strawberries off the ground.

By the side porch of the house, we found the chicken topiary with eggs.

On the porch:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the catio

Allan’s photo

garden shed in the side yard, next to a chicken coop

I have that same set of chickens, and they fall over all the time.  These were wired into the ground to stay put.

real chooks

a rose petal snack

vigorously digging a hole

Allan’s photo

After the chicken coop came the shade garden.


a courtyard off to the side as one goes toward the back garden.

at the center of the paths

a perfect hosta

Allan’s photo

I looked beyond to find the work area, always of interest.

horse poop, I believe

how so perfect??

Behind the back garden was a barn and pastures.  One dark grey horse walked away from having its photo taken; another was being groomed.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

an enormous climbing hydrangea

behind the house

I love this cat sculpture.

more of the garden along the horse pastures

plates in a bike wheel

Coming around the house, another border featuring perfect hostas…

Allan’s photo

By looking hard, Allan found a few tiny holes in hosta leaves, just to make me feel less inferior.

Allan’s photo

the house from the hosta bed

perfect…how?

We had taken a long time touring this garden and admiring all the flowers and those perfect hostas.  We still had one more garden to tour today before the tour time ended.

 

 

 

 

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First, an exciting announcement. The Astoria garden tour is back!  Read more about it here.

Sunday, 16 July 2017

We continued our peninsula garden tour day, with Ann and Evan, at Dave and Melissa’s Sea Star Garden on the outskirts of Oysterville.  On several acres, much of which is ungardenable wetland, our friends have spent the past two years using their rare days off from their gardening business to create their own paradise. Because they used to own a nursery called Glauca Moon, they arrived here with a large palette of plants in pots.

Dave and Mel’s past life

Sea Star Garden

On the left as you enter the driveway is a large raised garden where once a decrepit old house stood (a house that was unsafe to even enter).  This garden came about when a new septic system had to be installed last year.

Melissa and Evan

On top, a carpet of sedums will solve the problem of not being able to plant anything deep rooted on the septic system.

Allan’s photo

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Dave, me, Melissa, Ann, Sean (Allan thinks this looks like a landing party from Star Trek.)

By the back deck of the house is a water feature with waterfall, made by a friend of the previous owner.

Evan and Ann looking at the pond.

the deck pond

in the water (Allan’s photo)

water lilies (Allan’s photo)

pond frog (Allan’s photo)

north of the house

north of the house

The property had been owned by a gardener before and abounds in interesting trees and shrubs.

The Eucalyptus that Melissa named Elvis.

Ann and one of at least two Acer griseum (paperbark maple)

Acer griseum (Allan’s photo)

one of the maples that Dave and Mel brought with them

Acer pseudoplatanus ‘Eskimo Sunset’; This tree had a surprise.

bird nest (Allan’s photo)

old bridge on the north side (Allan’s photo)

Evan, Ann, Melissa in the woods to the north of the house (Allan’s photo)

As Dave and Mel clear the underbrush, they are finding all sorts of hardscapes like two small ponds and a big stone circle with a stone bench.

Evan and the mysterious stone circle (Allan’s photo)

Hostas are one of their favourites in the shade garden.

on the deck (You can find sand dollars on the north end of the beach here.)

Next, we went to the garden of a North Beach Garden Gang friend, just south of Oysterville.

Todd’s Family Garden

As we drove up, Todd was weeding.

Allan’s photo

The house reminded us all of a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece.

Around the family home, Todd has planted his collection from his years as the display garden curator at Plant Delights nursery in North Carolina.

in the sunshine

Morina longifolia

Ann and Evan examining and inspecting (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Ann and Evan admire the view of Willapa Bay.

Todd surveys an area full of potential.

You can see Allan taking this photo of the shade garden.

Todd’s shade garden (Allan’s photo)

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Spigelia marilandica ‘Little Redhead’

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The kitchen garden, which one of Todd’s family describes as “a real garden, none of this foo foo stuff” lay far below.  Because my heel was hurting, I sat this part of the trip out. (Todd kindly offered to go get a truck but I did not want everyone to have to wait.) Allan’s photos of that part of the excursion:

descending on a woodland path

the kitchen and flower cutting garden

Evan in the berry patch

kitchen garden

Ann harvesting carrots

sweet peas

fenced garden

walking to the bay

Todd has a handful of lettuce and carrots that became our salad for the next two nights.

Ann in her element

back up the road (the woods path down was a shortcut)

Meanwhile….

While I waited up top, I looked at my present from Lorna.  She had given me a book as we parted ways at The Oysterville Garden.

Thank you, Lorna!

a dedication that speaks to my heart

I also pondered curmudgeonly thoughts about garden tour programs that I feel compelled to share.  If curmudgeonliness annoys rather than amuses you, please avoid.

One of the gardens on today’s informal tour, Martie and Steve’s, had been on the local tour the day before. The tour program suggested its symmetry was “reminiscent of centuries old British estates” and “will put you in mind of Downton Abbey”.  Perhaps because it had a cricket lawn? Perhaps because of the green lawns in general?  It reminded me of my thoughts about garden tour descriptions, something that is always on my mind during garden tour season.

The Captain Stream House

Martie and Steve’s garden completely stood on its own and did not need to be compared to any other place.  The garden’s lines seemed clean and modern to me and certainly did not remind me of Downton Abbey.  Other than my usual desire to be in the UK, I would rather visit their garden than the site of Downton Abbey, anyway.

 I was reminded of the previous year’s comparison of a small garden to an Italian courtyard, leading to confusion on the part of tour guests (much of which I heard about later…even unto it being mentioned this year, and at the time, a friend texted me from that garden asking for enlightenment about the description).  I think that serious garden tour guests take every word of a description into consideration.  Raising expectations is not wise.  That particular garden (the non-Italian-courtyard) also stood well on its own because its big pots and hand made pavers were all portable; I would have described it as being a small garden that showed perfect solutions for folks who are renters rather than property owners.  There’s no need to get fanciful and make tour guests expect something grander than what is there.  Instead of describing a garden as “extensive” when it isn’t, describe it honestly as small but plant-i-ful. (To be fair, this year the word “extensive” was used to describe a tiny local garden in a newspaper article, not in the program itself.)  I think it is especially important not to aggrandize a garden.

The Master Gardeners’ north county tour, which I have now attended for two years, is good at avoiding hyperbole (with only one exception out of 12 garden descriptions in two years…a solid record of accurate descriptions).

The Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend programs tend to be accurate and non-aggrandizing (although I do remember, just once, looking for a cactus garden that turned out to be a couple of specimens in a pot).

I also do not like being told to walk here, stroll there, sit there, admire this, ask the gardener that.  Just describe the garden in a factual sense.  Here is an imaginary example: If I am told that “a salvaged window defines the edge of the garden by the river”, I will find it and admire it on my own without being told “Be sure to admire the salvaged window,” or “Ask the gardener where she got that window.”  (Clearly, I do have issues with being told what to do—thus 41 years of self employment.)

I don’t expect all readers to agree.  Now, let’s go on to one of my favourite peninsula gardens, the bayside garden of Steve and John.

 

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Sunday, 26 June 2016

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Salem Hardy Plant Society

garden 24: an eclectic, artistic garden in Woodburn

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This garden’s artistic touches strongly appealed to me along with its selection of interesting plants.  The shady nature of the garden was welcome on a 90 plus degree day and also made pocketcam photography difficult.  We did our best to do the garden justice.

It was clear, from across the street, that something exciting awaited us.

It was clear, from across the street, that something exciting awaited us.

along the sidewalk

along the sidewalk

garden entry

garden entry

Hardy Planters who were departing had delighted expressions and said we were in for a treat.

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entering the front garden

entering the front garden

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more Podophyllum 'Spotty Dotty', more regret that I did not buy some.

more Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’, more regret that I did not buy some.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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an elegant outbuilding

an elegant outbuilding

behind the outbuilding, a fabulous stash of garden ingredients

behind the outbuilding, a fabulous stash of garden ingredients

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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outbuilding wall that faces the back garden

outbuilding wall that faces the back garden

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looking back at the outbuilding

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dovecoat

dovecoat

complete with doves

complete with doves

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Some free range chickens, including one with a cute topknot, were also around.  They were shy and hidden in the shrubbery so I failed to get a photo.

Allan got a chicken photo!

Allan got a chicken photo!

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Another garden with perfect hostas. Maybe chickens eat the snails.

Another garden with perfect hostas. Maybe chickens eat the snails.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Podophyllum 'Spotty Dotty'

Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’

lost in the deep woods

lost in the deep woods

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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dripping water

dripping water

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Spotty Dotty again

Spotty Dotty again

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entry to a living tunnel

entry to a living tunnel

Ok. where in my garden can I do this? Oh....I have a salmonberry tunnel...not this cool.

Ok. where in my garden can I do this? Oh….I have a salmonberry tunnel…not this cool.

This is magical.

This is magical.

me, loving the tunnel

me, loving the tunnel

out the other end. To the right, a pavilion with stone pillars.

out the other end. To the right, a pavilion with stone pillars.

and refreshments

and refreshments

Hardy Planters

Hardy Planters

including Our Ann

including Our Ann

and a garden host

and a garden host

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

little dog looking into the tunnel

little dog looking into the tunnel

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across from the pavilion

across from the pavilion

at the front corner of the garden

at the front corner of the garden

front of house

front of house

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the way out

the way out

I don’t want to leave this paradise, yet I must.  There was one more garden to see (the last one written about in the previous post; it did not take long but I did not know that would be the case) and a three hour drive home.

Takeaways: I need Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’, and a larger lot, and I need to get the salmonberry groves cleaned out to make room for more shade plant collections, and I need more repurposed junk and some stone pillars.  Dang it.

You can see more photos here, on The Eye of the Lady, taken with a much bigger camera and with great skill.

the way home

91 degrees F as we drive through farm and vineyard country

91 degrees F as we drive through farm and vineyard country

This area grows many of the ornamental trees and shrubs shipped all over the country. Some fields had fascinating variety.

This area grows many of the ornamental trees and shrubs shipped all over the country. Some fields had fascinating variety.

orchards

orchards

We were interested to learn that there is a trail all the way from Banks to Vernonia.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

After a scary drive over the coast range, facing long lines of impatient and pushy drivers heading back to the city after a seaside weekend, we were pleased to enter maritime weather.

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61 degrees and salty

a feast at Himani Indian Cuisine in Astoria ended our four day holiday.

a feast at Himani Indian Cuisine in Astoria ended our four day holiday.

after dinner, some Astoria planter admiration

after dinner, some Astoria planter admiration

well done, Astoria

well done, Astoria

Four days, 25 gardens (including the Oregon Garden)!  Tomorrow, we will resume publishing just in the mornings, at least until another garden tour day comes up.  There are three in the near future, unfortunately all on the same day.

right here on the Long Beach Peninsula

right here on the Long Beach Peninsula

in Aberdeen, 1.5 hours away

in Aberdeen, 1.5 hours north

In Tillamook, 2 hours south

In Tillamook, 2 hours south

 

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Sunday, 26 June 2016

Hardy Plant Study Weekend, presented by Salem Hardy Plant Society

The previous garden and the one we are about to visit were surrounded by farm fields.

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garden 21: Adelman Peony Garden

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Allan's photo. He says these fields were soon to be cut, and that Adelman's had once used this field for peony growing.

Allan’s photo. He says these fields of fescue were soon to be cut, and that Adelman’s had once used this field for peony growing.

Like the Schreiner’s Iris Gardens display, the peony garden would look amazing during peony bloom time, which was over.  However, the garden surrounding the home was immaculate and had other plants of interest.

satellite view

satellite view

yellow rose at the edge of the parking area above the house

yellow rose at the edge of the parking area above the house

the vista at the upper garden entrance

the vista at the upper garden entrance

The eucomis may enjoy the warmth of living inland. Mine never do more than put out three or four leaves and one flower.

The eucomis may enjoy the warmth of living inland. Mine never do more than put out three or four leaves and one flower.  Eucomis envy!

AND delphinium envy

AND delphinium envy

Acanthus (Allan's photo)

Acanthus (Allan’s photo)

Allan commented how each plant is given its own space. (Allan's photo)

Allan commented how each plant is given its own space. (Allan’s photo)

would be spectacular during peony time

would be spectacular during peony time

Mighty Velvet Lamb's Ears is going on my must have list.

Mighty Velvet Lamb’s Ears is going on my must have list.

a bit of welcome lattice shade in 90 degree weather

a bit of welcome lattice shade in 90 degree weather

waterfall in the garden below the house

waterfall in the garden below the house

Inside the cool indoor display area, I drank lemonade and admired peonies.  These flowers had been kept refrigerated until garden tour day.

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garden 22: Craftsman Bungalow Garden 

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I adore a Craftsman Bungalow.  My home in Seattle was one, although not nearly as beautifully detailed as Mary Beth’s.  I also adore a garden made with love more than with money.  This garden and home were immensely pleasing to me.

from across the street

from the side, across the street  (It was a hot, bright day.)

front of the house from across the street

front of the house from across the street

I also adore a good hellstrip like this one.

I also adore a good hellstrip like this one.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

front porch (Allan's photo)

front porch (Allan’s photo)

love this!! (Allan's photo

love this!! (Allan’s photo

shady corner of front garden; next door is a parking lot

shady corner of front garden; next door is a parking lot

archway to the back garden

archway to the back garden (which is actually a side garden)

into the back garden

into the back garden

delicious shade

delicious shade

catalpa tree (Allan's photo)

catalpa tree (Allan’s photo)

I had thought I did not like Podophyllum 'Spotty Dotty'. Now I deeply regretted having passed up the opportunity to buy one earlier this weekend.

I had thought I did not like Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’. Now I deeply regretted having passed up the opportunity to buy one earlier this weekend.

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a pond in the center of the garden

a pond in the center of the garden

This was the first sign I saw all weekend of a device to keep predators out of a pond.

This was the first sign I saw all weekend of a device to keep predators out of a pond.

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the catalpa tree

the catalpa tree

garden creator (center)

garden creator (center)

much fancier that my bungolow was (Allan's photo)

much fancier that my bungolow was (Allan’s photo)

After this weekend, I feel a great need for a sideways weeping tree.

After this weekend, I feel a great need for a sideways weeping cedar.

a sit spot by the back wall of the garage

a sit spot by the back wall of the garage

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note the metal fence on the property line

note the metal fence on the property line

from the little behind-the-garage courtyard

from the little behind-the-garage courtyard

inside the carport, exterior wall of house

inside the carport, exterior wall of house

In front of the garage. I absolutely love the salvaged metal fence and wish I had one.

In front of the garage. I absolutely love the salvaged metal fence and wish I had one.

an admiring look at the back of the house

an admiring look at the back of the house

I’d love to have stayed longer.  We had two more gardens to see and then the drive home.  The next two were within walking distance (albeit a hot walk in 90 degree sunshine).  After the last garden visit of the day, as we walked back past Mary Beth’s to return to our van, she was out in the side garden weeding and pruning.

garden 23: Misty’s garden

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We actually saw this small garden last (it was #23 on the program but #24 for us) because I got mixed up on the addresses.  Neither Allan nor I did a good job of capturing it.  I found myself concentrating on walking on uneven surfaces and not looking much at the plants.  (A woman emerging, also with a cane, commented on it being difficult walking.  A young garden creator would not notice this.)

entry garden

entry garden

entry garden

entry garden

new acquisitions from Dancing Oaks nursery (Allan's photo)

new acquisitions from Dancing Oaks nursery (Allan’s photo)

treehouse (Allan's photo)

treehouse (Allan’s photo)

front porch

front porch

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path to back garden

into the back garden

into the back garden

back porch

back porch

I completely failed in getting a photo of the waterfall behind this bridge.

I regret that I completely failed in getting a photo of the waterfall behind this bridge.

Next: Our last garden visit of the three day tour proved to be one of my top five favourites of the whole tour.

 

 

 

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